Wise words

#1
From today's Telegraph

SIR - I'm glad that the Ministry of Defence is looking after its staff by buying ergonomic chairs, at a cost of around £300 each (letter, July 14), to prevent employees damaging their backs.

Does it realise that, by providing body armour for some of its other employees, it can prevent chest injuries?

From:
Dr James Filby, Sheffield

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/...ml?xml=/opinion/2004/07/17/dt1703.xml&site=15
 
#2
Oh and some drivel from some matloe.....

Sir - As a naval officer, I spent the past nine years of my service career working with and for the Army, including a stint on the Government's Strategic Defence Review of 1997-98.

In trying to man single-battalion regiments for operational tasks, I regularly found immense difficulty in putting together a cohesive force from the same cap badge (News, July 16). Invariably, regiments had to borrow whole companies from other regiments in order to be at operational strength.

It seemed to me that this flew directly in the face of the regimental argument that fighting morale could be maintained only if men fighting together belonged to the same regiment, recruited from the same background.

The Navy, by comparison, has long relied on "trickle drafting", whereby a ship's company is a constantly changing entity. It seems to do little damage to fighting morale and certainly is a far more effective and flexible use of manpower.

Discussion papers to my Army superiors fell on stony ground. The regimental system was sacrosanct and the unseen power brokers of retired senior officers who form the cadre of regimental colonels ensured that it remained so.

Meanwhile, I was left to sort out the idiosyncrasies of my part of the arms plot as best I could. To that extent I, personally, welcome the postulated changes.

From:
Cdre Peter Melson, London EC3

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/...ml?xml=/opinion/2004/07/17/dt1701.xml&site=15
 
#3
Meanwhile, I was left to sort out the idiosyncrasies of my part of the arms plot as best I could. To that extent I, personally, welcome the postulated changes
Thats the key line; this kn*b obviously fell into the bureaucratic trap of believing that the world should be organised to make his life easier. :roll:
 
#4
Discussion papers to my Army superiors fell on stony ground.


Im not surprised they fell on stony ground, what a prat, he should stick to naval matters.
 
#6
What the sailor boy seems to forget is that Captains hate it when their god people are moved around too much and use the system to shunt troublemakers onto someone else. Also crews must be drawn together simply because they all live and work in the same ship, where if someone fouls up they all have a long swim home. Army units don't have this "cohesion of necessity" and so need to seek cohesion through a shared identity.
 
#7
Bladensburg said:
What the sailor boy seems to forget is that Captains hate it when their god people are moved around too much and use the system to shunt troublemakers onto someone else. Also crews must be drawn together simply because they all live and work in the same ship, where if someone fouls up they all have a long swim home. Army units don't have this "cohesion of necessity" and so need to seek cohesion through a shared identity.
Lets try not to make this more academic than it needs to be. Its simple the mans a cnut who thinks he knows it all and feels p*ssed off that people didn't listen to him. He's probably short as well.
 
#8
notmesir said:
Bladensburg said:
What the sailor boy seems to forget is that Captains hate it when their god people are moved around too much and use the system to shunt troublemakers onto someone else. Also crews must be drawn together simply because they all live and work in the same ship, where if someone fouls up they all have a long swim home. Army units don't have this "cohesion of necessity" and so need to seek cohesion through a shared identity.
Lets try not to make this more academic than it needs to be. Its simple the mans a cnut who thinks he knows it all and feels p*ssed off that people didn't listen to him. He's probably short as well.
i hate to say it, but with a few exceptions, by my experience he sounds like a typical Naval Officer.
 
#10
claymore said:
notmesir said:
Bladensburg said:
He's probably short as well.
And ginger. :lol:
And not that well informed: in Todays Toryrag:

Sir - Cdre Melson, a naval officer, has entered the lists in a particularly delicate Army matter. I can recall when Lord Lewin, on his way up, was destroying trickle-drafting as wholly inimical to good warship morale. At the time, I was seeking re-examination by the naval staff of the views of Admiral Fisher, Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet.

After the 1931 mutiny in the Atlantic Fleet, he strongly advocated a change to some form of regimental organisation as practised by the Army and the abolition of trickle-drafting.

From:
Vice-Adml Sir Louis Le Bailly, St Tudy, Cornwall
 
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Guest
#11
rabid spaniel said:
claymore said:
notmesir said:
Bladensburg said:
He's probably short as well.
And ginger. :lol:
And not that well informed: in Todays Toryrag:

Sir - Cdre Melson, a naval officer, has entered the lists in a particularly delicate Army matter. I can recall when Lord Lewin, on his way up, was destroying trickle-drafting as wholly inimical to good warship morale. At the time, I was seeking re-examination by the naval staff of the views of Admiral Fisher, Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet.

After the 1931 mutiny in the Atlantic Fleet, he strongly advocated a change to some form of regimental organisation as practised by the Army and the abolition of trickle-drafting.

From:
Vice-Adml Sir Louis Le Bailly, St Tudy, Cornwall
That looks like a torpedo amidships :D
 
#13
Perhaps now we can see why we are often on the end of bizarre decision making from the MOD. In an era that is obsessed with 'jointery' we have to put up with navy officers making uninformed decisions about Army matters etc. Those that work at the PJHQ for example will note how the senior positions at colonel and above are dominated by the RAF, even through all of our enduring operations are (and have been for some time) predominently Land focused.
 
#14
Dartmouth provied the worst trained oficers in the Brit mil system, in my day, sort of permemenant pain in the rectum.
Most believed Nelson was still alive.
john
 
#15
jonwilly said:
Most believed Nelson was still alive.
john
You're trying to tell us he's not? How will we ever beat the French now? Best keep a weather eye open for white sails on the horizon and the whiff of garlic in the air. How about that Raleigh fella? He still around?:roll:
 
#16
[/quote]

How about that Raleigh fella? He still around?:roll:[/quote]

Last heard he was in Nottingham making bicycles, but that was a few years ago mind........
 
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