Winter - Is the car ready?

Most of the list is overkill, but why would anybody NOT carry a decent size first-aid kit? If you don't know what to do, or faint at the sight of blood, then someone else will use it -- possibly on you. And if one has no current first-aid training then I would ask why do you hate the rest of the world so much?
I’ve ummed and arred about first aid kits in the car.

I’ve settled for two field dressings and a tourniquet.
 

NSP

LE
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
You have kids and grandchildren? You old fart, you.
 
Not sure if this is true ,but I read that Halfords retracted their offer of free lightbulb replacement on Saabs when they discovered it took eight hours of labour to replace them.
 
b) the truck itself will call for help if there's an accident,
Ever put that to the test? Dealt with a bmw a while back that was in a smash. The BMW sent an sos to whatever monitoring station handled it, Driver was in an obscure location, phoned us, we phoned amb. Line then cleared and we had to call him back. Took a while to get hold of him... driver had been bombarded with a flurry of other phone calls trying to get through, and subjected to a full ‘customer service experience’ as some bird somewhere worked down a checklist.
I think they were probably taking the “would yourselves care to complete a customer satisfaction survey for ourselves” bit just as police and amb arrived. Good job his wife was with him and had her phone on her.
 
Ever put that to the test? Dealt with a bmw a while back that was in a smash. The BMW sent an sos to whatever monitoring station handled it, Driver was in an obscure location, phoned us, we phoned amb. Line then cleared and we had to call him back. Took a while to get hold of him... driver had been bombarded with a flurry of other phone calls trying to get through, and subjected to a full ‘customer service experience’ as some bird somewhere worked down a checklist.
I think they were probably taking the “would yourselves care to complete a customer satisfaction survey for ourselves” bit just as police and amb arrived. Good job his wife was with him and had her phone on her.
No I haven't. But I'm confident the local PSAP would have my location between the truck and my phone. If that's not the case, I'm probably on a losing ticket regardless.
 

Bogie_Bear

War Hero
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
Why don't you just tow a spare car behind you?
 
I bought a load of Mylar blankets from eBay, I’ve stopped at least three times to wrap someone up in them who’ve collapsed etc.
Our council gives them out every winter, it's some deal we have with government and a wheen of local car businesses, they have advertising on them but who gives a F.
 
I would just be happy if people checked their lights were working! Modern cars with DRL's mean that only the dash and front driving lights are on, no rear lights... The number of people I have followed who seem totally unaware astounds me.

Oh yes, and can people please clear their wind screens of frost and snow off the roof too. Pretending your a panzer driver while uTubing doesn't make you cool, it makes you a Tw@t!!!
 
My German's a bit rusty, what does Einmannpackung mean?
It means one man pack. Normally tastes like shite magically transforms to Ambrosia after a cold, long and wet night on Ex.
 

load_fin

Old-Salt
She should take a parka, woolly hat, gloves, scarf, and winter boots with her even if she doesn't intend to wear them. Not necessarily all the time, but at least take them when there is the possibility of bad weather.
Don't leave this kit in the boot - when you need it, it will be flipping cold. I know this from shivery experience...
Keep it in a bag by the front door, and put it in the back seat
 
There has been mention of snow chains. Most of you know they are heavy and when needing to be used, very cold and heavy! They will also be tangled into a right bunch of bastards, no matter how carefully they were stowed away!

Despite living in sunny southern Spain, I'm less than an hour away from a ski resort (yes, really!). If driving up the road to it after snow has fallen, the Guardia Civil can and do stop vehicles to see if they are carrying (mandatory at or above the snow line) snow chains. If not, they are turned back.

Now to the point - there is an alternative. They are fabric wheel cover things, dead light and take about 20 seconds to put on. Mine are called 'Easy Sock' or 'Snow Sock' or something. They take up the space of a rolled up towel and will stay in the boot in the spare-wheel well forever - or until The Guardia ask to see them!
 

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