Winter - Is the car ready?

Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
 

Chef

LE
I take it she lives way out in the sticks. If she's just using it to tool around town for sub five mile journeys then I'd suggest the kit list is a bit OTT. Dress to the threat and all that.

Mech prep and POL is sensible.

I can't see her popping out to the shops, it's not like there's space in the wagon for shopping:cool:
 

kimmi851

Old-Salt
My car is stuck at work until my leg unbreaks itself enough to collect it (probably after Christmas)… I am considering this my car being safe for me and other people for the duration.
 
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
With the amount that she's carrying around for winter, is this her vehicle?
1969_alvis_stahlwart_mk2_limber_15308594649f98764daDSC_0793-1280x851-940x625.jpg


All kidding aside, that's a fairly comprehensive list. But I also carry around a quart bottle of methyl hydrate as well, as it's a fuel line anti-freeze and lock de-icer.
 
I take it she lives way out in the sticks. If she's just using it to tool around town for sub five mile journeys then I'd suggest the kit list is a bit OTT. Dress to the threat and all that.

Mech prep and POL is sensible.

I can't see her popping out to the shops, it's not like there's space in the wagon for shopping:cool:
She works down near the south coast mate. About an hour's drive from London.
 
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
How are you going to do that?
 

Fake Sheikh

Old-Salt
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
Are you in the UK or somewhere like the M25 or wildest Scotland?

I just maintain the car to as a higher standard as I did the the army.
Fluid levels topped up daily/weekly depending on journey.
Wheel spider/Tyre Air Machine/x2 Hi Vis/Waterproof/Spare Fuses/Spare Fluids/Torch & Money
 

Slime

LE
While the thought of 'adding anti freeze to the radiator' might be showing your age, getting the coolant level checked is alwaysca good idea, as is knowing which type of coolant your car uses.

Something that is free, , and useful in an ermency or breakdown is the 'what3words' app (what 3 words). It's a free app that will give a unique three word code to any 3 square area anywhere on the globe.

If, God forbid, a driver crashed into a field or similar* the what3words app would give the position of the car in that field, this three word position is plottable by the emergency services.

*Obviously many new cars will make an emergency call either automatically or with one press on a button from the driver.
 
I'd add a pair of crampons, the sort you can slip over some trainers

They're not expensive and if you ever do break down in the snow, getting about will still be easy
 
I haven't had cause to use it, but candles, a box of matches and an empty tin can to hold the candles are recommended.
 
While the thought of 'adding anti freeze to the radiator' might be showing your age, getting the coolant level checked is alwaysca good idea, as is knowing which type of coolant your car uses.

Something that is free, , and useful in an ermency or breakdown is the 'what3words' app (what 3 words). It's a free app that will give a unique three word code to any 3 square area anywhere on the globe.

If, God forbid, a driver crashed into a field or similar* the what3words app would give the position of the car in that field, this three word position is plottable by the emergency services.

*Obviously many new cars will make an emergency call either automatically or with one press on a button from the driver.
Thank you sir. Will look into this.
 
Where is she driving, outer Mongolia?

I've been lax putting the winter tyres on my wagon this year. The wife wants to take it and her mates to Brizzle this weekend, not before she gives me a hand swapping them over.
 
Most of the list is overkill, but why would anybody NOT carry a decent size first-aid kit? If you don't know what to do, or faint at the sight of blood, then someone else will use it -- possibly on you. And if one has no current first-aid training then I would ask why do you hate the rest of the world so much?
 

philc

LE
Simple thing and very little room a couple of hessian sacks if you cant get traction, and make sure she knows if its front or rear wheel drive.
 
I would expect my daughter to get an annual service for the car. Car fuses can be checked with a multimeter.
If the fuse doesn't work then a bit of the car won't work, which would be fairly clear? If the fuse is slowly being cooked then a resistance check still wouldn't show anything other than zero ohms. Most fuses are visually check-able and that would be better -- any scorched-but-not-blown fuse will be spotted, as will any corrosion in the fusebox.
 
Gents,
It's nearly December, and those long winter nights will soon be upon us. So I thought that now would be a good time to remind the users of Arrse to make sure that their cars - and more importantly; your kids and grandchildren's cars are 'winter ready'.
It's important to not only ensure that the car's tyres are at the correct pressure, but that the electronics are good, the oil level is topped up, and that anti-freeze is added to the radiator. As well as carrying some essential kit that should help to ensure that in the event of a break down, you or they don't freeze to death!
My eldest daughter has finally passed her driving test, so I thought that I'd pass on some information on the kit that I have added to a bag that stays in the boot of her car.
The most important item that I felt that she needed was an AA breakdown and recovery service membership.
But for the car I have added:
A set of jump leads.
A four way tyre spanner - her car came with a jack and one of them tiny useless single tyre spanners to change the spare wheel. As well as a warning triangle.
A can of emergency tyre repair.
A small folding metal shovel.
A fire extinguisher.
A big feck off all singing all dancing powerful torch.
A can of de-icer.
An ice scrapper.
A petrol container - with the funnel.
A hammer designed to shatter windows - which can also be used to cut a seat belt. This is attached to the driver's sun visor.
A set of hi-viz waterproof jacket and trousers - the next size up!
Her old walking boots that she was gonna sling away, along with a rolled up set of Sealskin socks inside.
Sealskin glooves and beany.
A headover.
A thick fleece jacket.
£20 in cash. To be used for emergency fuel purchases only, and not a cheeky take away or something with the promise that it will be put back at a later date!
I once got caught out about fifteen years ago when I needed fuel. There was no atm machine at the garage, and the card reader was playing up. Fortunately, I had ID on me, so the bloke behind the jump accepted this, along with the promise that I would return to pay. And yes, I was true to my word before someone asks!
A phone charger.
A thick fleece blanket.
An emergency bivvi that is lined with mylar.
A couple of tea light candles. Along with with a multipack of disposable lighters.
A few snacks, teabags, sugar, milk powder.
I also constantly encourage and remind her to take a flask of hot water with her, whenever she is making journeys longer than a quick trip to the shops. I bet that she wishes that she had never bothered to drive now!
Off of the top of my head, I think that that's about it. Obviously this is not a comprehensive list by any stretch of the imagination. So if people have any sensible suggestions that I've missed, and that they feel people should be aware of, then please feel free to share it.
All of this waffling on, and I have forgotten the most important thing about the purpose behind this thread. And that is to please please please educate your kids and grandkids.
As us wisened old owls all know, you can have all the kit in the world, but if you don't know how to use it, and to use it correctly, then it's pointless having it.
Edited to add: I want to know what people think about carrying a detailed and comprehensive first aid kit in their car.
I do, but I'm quite knowledgeble on the subject.
I don't see the point in carrying shït loads of first aid kit if you don't know how to use it for example.
Am interested in what others think about the points that I've raised in this thread.
If you are worried about snow, stick a 40 pound sand bag in the “boot”...

I think that is the correct terminology.

Water bottles If you don’t have those.
Road flare and a rape whistle.
 

DTBA

Old-Salt
My car is ready to get rusted to **** because other people can't drive for toffee, so the state cover the roads in grit and salt.
 
I would expect my daughter to get an annual service for the car. Car fuses can be checked with a multimeter.
Sure, an annual service for the car is advisable. However, if the electronics are going to fail they're going to fail and no amount of servicing or checking fuses with multimeters is going to prevent it. In any case, sensor failures are much more common than electronics failures.
 
If you are worried about snow, stick a 40 pound sand bag in the “boot”...

I think that is the correct terminology.

Water bottles If you don’t have those.
Road flare and a rape whistle.
She won't need a 40 pound sand bag in the boot, when she has a 50lb box full of all that shite...



...wait, rape whistle????
 

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