Winston Churchill Funeral

50 years ago, right now, to the minute, I sat in front of my grandparents black and white TV, watching the funeral of Winston Churchill. I was 12, and didn't fully appreciate what I was watching. My auntie June had tears streaming down her face. My grandfather got a whiskey bottle out and toasted "better days". He had fought in WW1, and then was in the fire service in WW2.

The funeral is being covered "live" in the Telegraph.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/win...f-Winston-Churchill-January-30-1965-live.html

From memory the bearers were given MBEs.

Does anyone else remember today, 50 years ago. Was anyone there?
 
The Beeb have been doing a few telly programs on it.

It nearly went pear shaped on the steps into St Paul's.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Does anyone else remember today, 50 years ago. Was anyone there?
I was nine. The stranger who was my father (worked in South America: his contract gave him three months at home every three years) was in the UK for the last time (he died two years later).

I remember Churchill died and I remember the funeral (mainly that it was done far better than Kennedy's and the soon to take place de Gaulle's) but mainly that this bloke (my father) was seriously not very happy. Me mum just kept running the family as ever and we children knew to be seen and not heard.
 
10:09 Next up are the army boys: Royal Sussex TA, hussars, yeomanry, and the marching band of the Foot Guards. Then regiments from the three outer nations of the United Kingdom – Welsh Guards, Irish Guards, Scots Guards, and the Coldstreams – and after them, the Royal Marines. The fire service and civil defence corps who played such crucial roles during the Blitz are also on the march.

I assume the Royal Sussex, Hussars and Yeomanry had some close connection to Winston?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I assume the Royal Sussex, Hussars and Yeomanry had some close connection to Winston?
Churchill's father was bloody furious with him when he took a commission in a cavalry regiment (istr Yeomanry - easy enough to verify) and not joining the infantry. Obviously the family was flawed: we all know that the purpose of cavalry in warfare is to bring style and panache to what would otherwise just be an ugly brawl.
 
I was only 9 but I remember it more than I do any of the later state funerals.

That's probably because there hasn't been a state funeral since.
 
The BBC got in a spot of bother earlier this week for interviewing some of the union member former dock workers who said they hated him and had been paid to lower the cranes.

Any man who was hated by the unions was probably doing something right in my book.
 
Good Grief. I just looked up his military career. He certainly got about:

Winston was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 4th Queen's Own Hussars on 20 February 1895.

In 1895, during the Cuban War of Independence, Churchill, and fellow officer Reginald Barnes, travelled to Cuba to observe the Spanish fight the Cuban guerrillas. While there, he soon acquired a taste for Havana cigars, which he would smoke for the rest of his life.

Churchill was posted to India in 1896 as a young army officer, posted to the North West Frontier to fight in the Second Anglo-Afghan War.

In 1897 he fought under the command of General Jeffery, the commander of the second brigade operating in Malakand, in the Frontier region of British India.

Churchill transferred to Egypt in 1898 on attachment to the 21st Lancers serving in the Sudan under the command of General Herbert Kitchener. He participated in what has been described as the last meaningful British cavalry charge, at the Battle of Omdurman in September 1898.

In 1899 he went to South Africa to report on the Boer War as a civilian. He was takne prisoner but escaped.

In 1900 he retired from the regular army, and in 1902 joined the Imperial Yeomanry, where he was commissioned as a Captain in the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

In 1905, he was promoted to Major and appointed to command of the Henley Squadron of the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

In September 1916, he transferred to the territorial reserves of officers, where he remained until retiring in 1924, at the age of fifty.
 
Saw in interesting programme on the events that day. His daughter Lady Soames, declared the lowering of the Thames cranes as the barge passed, was one of the highlights of what had been an emotional day for everyone...But Paxman, interviewed one of the crane operators sons, who stated that it was no such thing. It was in fact a sign of disapproval from them, due to the fact that they were soon to be made redundant, as the docks were to close..Strange how certain events can never be taken at face value.
 

lert

LE
Good Grief. I just looked up his military career. He certainly got about:

Winston was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 4th Queen's Own Hussars on 20 February 1895.

In 1895, during the Cuban War of Independence, Churchill, and fellow officer Reginald Barnes, travelled to Cuba to observe the Spanish fight the Cuban guerrillas. While there, he soon acquired a taste for Havana cigars, which he would smoke for the rest of his life.

Churchill was posted to India in 1896 as a young army officer, posted to the North West Frontier to fight in the Second Anglo-Afghan War.

In 1897 he fought under the command of General Jeffery, the commander of the second brigade operating in Malakand, in the Frontier region of British India.

Churchill transferred to Egypt in 1898 on attachment to the 21st Lancers serving in the Sudan under the command of General Herbert Kitchener. He participated in what has been described as the last meaningful British cavalry charge, at the Battle of Omdurman in September 1898.

In 1899 he went to South Africa to report on the Boer War as a civilian. He was takne prisoner but escaped.

In 1900 he retired from the regular army, and in 1902 joined the Imperial Yeomanry, where he was commissioned as a Captain in the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

In 1905, he was promoted to Major and appointed to command of the Henley Squadron of the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

In September 1916, he transferred to the territorial reserves of officers, where he remained until retiring in 1924, at the age of fifty.
Did he not also command a (Scottish?) battalion in France?
 
50 years ago, right now, to the minute, I sat in front of my grandparents black and white TV, watching the funeral of Winston Churchill. I was 12, and didn't fully appreciate what I was watching. My auntie June had tears streaming down her face. My grandfather got a whiskey bottle out and toasted "better days". He had fought in WW1, and then was in the fire service in WW2.

The funeral is being covered "live" in the Telegraph.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/win...f-Winston-Churchill-January-30-1965-live.html

From memory the bearers were given MBEs.

Does anyone else remember today, 50 years ago. Was anyone there?

I was 6 and remember watching it with parents, grandparents on their first television.
8 years later, in the Naval section of the school CCF, I discovered that the bloke in charge of the gun carriage carrying his body was our very own boss, CPO Sprake.

Wonderful man, impressive service record.
 
50 years ago, right now, to the minute, I sat in front of my grandparents black and white TV, watching the funeral of Winston Churchill. I was 12,

Does anyone else remember today, 50 years ago. Was anyone there?

You are older than me then. I remember it vaguely. Being born in October, 1955, I was nine years old and such matters were of only a passing interest to a young boy.

My mum and dad didn't cry but my dad did spend quite some time that day up the pub. Any excuse I think! I don't blame him though. My dad didn't say much about politics or the war either for that matter but he did have a strenuous war. Firstly he was drafted into the Navy and then later transferred across to the Army where he served in India and Malaya. He was wounded there and after he had recovered from his wounds received from Japanese mortar fire, he came back to Europe ending up in Germany where he fought until the end of the war.

Like many millions, not as illustrious as Churchill's contribution but certainly he played his part.

Churchills leadership during those times though set the pace for those who got on with the nuts and bolts of it all. We were fortunate that at such a time, we had him. The country even today owes him an enormous debt for his part in the conflict.
 
Some Quotes from The Guardian comments section that make interesting but unsurprising reading....

This one could be bollocks:

My father used to tell the tale of how Churchill came to visit his Air Ministry unit and local troops at a make-shift airfield in the Western Desert; he retreated under a hail of stones. The troops were mainly from South Wales, where the glorious leader had sent in armed soldiers against the striking miners.

Lieutenant Spencer-Churchill, architect of the concentration camps? Bollocks:

Another Tory festival this time of a man who did well on rhetoric and mass rallying during the Second World War but there are many reasons to not remember him as I am sure is how many South Africans feel after his internment of them in the Boer War where many women and children died.

Some drivel....

Yeah he was so adored the nation showed him the door in 45-obviously the brave fighting working class didn't share his vision of themselves and their families kept under the thumb while is ilk continued to suck off their sweat and labour. But here were are thanks to a right wing dominated media,fast tracking right back to those bad times.**** him.

And some common sense from an immigrant:

Fool, I have the shame of bearing the same as you. As an immigrant originally,( now a British citizen), who was recruited to fill the skills gap some 35 years ago, I watched overseas the solemn funeral and the procession. Only, a country like ours does not give the respect this greatest Englishman deserves, we and the idiotic EU countries should recognise what this great man did. As a former school governor I was ashamed that schools do not enough history lessons of our great leader and about Britain. We are often too much indulgent to those immigrants who do not have anything in common with our great society. I have lived through Labour's surrender at the time of the "Winter of Discontent" in 1979, and listened to the scandalous justification of what the unions did by Labour lefties. If I had my way, I would commemorate the memory of this great man every year
 
Saw in interesting programme on the events that day. His daughter Lady Soames, declared the lowering of the Thames cranes as the barge passed, was one of the highlights of what had been an emotional day for everyone...But Paxman, interviewed one of the crane operators sons, who stated that it was no such thing. It was in fact a sign of disapproval from them, due to the fact that they were soon to be made redundant, as the docks were to close..Strange how certain events can never be taken at face value.
I did tend to think that was rubbish , the chap saying they did not like Churchill because he always ahd a drink in one hand , and a cigar in the other . Forgetting that he walked around their bomb damaged streets to meet them and stopped the country being invaded .
Sounded like Cockney Chinese whispers to me .
 

horsencart

Old-Salt
During my Basic training in 1977 (REME) one of our DS who was in the Grenadier Guards had taken part in the funeral. He had been given the MBE for his participation, can't remember what his role was.
 

Latest Threads

Top