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Wines

#1
Don't know if this has been done before but I think it might compliment the cookery forum?

So what gems have you discovered and what have you found to be "unfit for purpose"?

I recently returned from Georgia and was pleasantly surprised to find a nation of poets and wine makers (no wonder they ran like fcuk from the Russians!). I came home clutching a bottle of Teriani Valleys 'Mukuzani' dry red and 'Kindzmarauli' semi sweet red. Top quality and highly recommended:

http://www.telianivalley.com/

Come on then ... recommendations?
 
#2
Aldi do a nice Rioja for 1.99

Edited to add: Comes with a screw top so no trying to push the cork into the bottle whilst sat on park bench bemoaning lack of corkscrew.
 
#3
A friend gave me some Algerian wines the other day - unfortunately I didn't get the names but the are fantastic.

For a light white a Turkish Kavaklidere Cankaya is good value.

St James Winery in America - unless you add sugar to treacle - is pony.
 
#4
I had Mukuyu port in zimbabwe a few years ago. great stuff it was - although it did make a muck-e-me and some other people the next morning.
 
#5
Anyone who has visited or plans to visit the Balkans, a Good Bottle of the Red stuff is highly recommended, the Montenegro Red Wine - Vranac, Pro Cordem has been produced with helping the heart in mind with a high level of prothoanthocyanidol hence marketed as being good for your heart, it's a very thick red wine and a lot of people here recommend it during the Winter (a Glass a Day for the Heart side, not a Bottle or 5 :wink: )...

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#9
Gundulph said:
Anyone who has visited or plans to visit the Balkans, a Good Bottle of the Red stuff is highly recommended, the Montenegro Red Wine - Vranac, Pro Cordem has been produced with helping the heart in mind with a high level of prothoanthocyanidol hence marketed as being good for your heart, it's a very thick red wine and a lot of people here recommend it during the Winter (a Glass a Day for the Heart side, not a Bottle or 5 :wink: )...

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I shall expect a bottle when we next meet :D
 
#10
I am an avid reader of the Jane McQuitty's wine column in the Saturday Times and my house is stocked with her recommendations! At the budget end, Tesco's own claret is extremely good and only £2.98. McQuitty recommends keeping all supermarket wines for six months to a year to let their flavour develop. I have a case in my cupboard under the stairs and am starting to stockpile for Christmas. Another good cheap wine is from Waitrose: Cuvee de la chasse (red) and also £2.99, I think.
 
#12
fairmaidofperth said:
Probably not great vintage but all for a good cause (they post to the UK)



vin de la Légion étrangère
A couple of years ago I had the honour of visiting the 1st Foreign Engineer Regiment in Laudon for a look at their EOD/Demining capability. I was presented with 2 bottles of Legionaire plonk and all I can say is that the bottle was interesting, the contents not so :)
 
#13
RED: I know Calafornia is not famous for its wines, but they have a fine Zinfadel called Pepperwood Grove, its has a very slight vanilla taste and it goes well with most red meats! Only costs about £7.

WHITE: I'm still working my way through the Marlborough Valley, all good so far! Isabel is cheaper than Cloudy Bay and far nicer. Sainsburys do a good Sancerre for around £6.

For a nice budget daily tipple, the Chilean Carta Viejo, Red and White, are both underrated.
 
#15
k13eod said:
Gundulph said:
Anyone who has visited or plans to visit the Balkans, a Good Bottle of the Red stuff is highly recommended, the Montenegro Red Wine - Vranac, Pro Cordem has been produced with helping the heart in mind with a high level of prothoanthocyanidol hence marketed as being good for your heart, it's a very thick red wine and a lot of people here recommend it during the Winter (a Glass a Day for the Heart side, not a Bottle or 5 :wink: )...

[align=center]
I shall expect a bottle when we next meet :D
Of course! but just the one, surely not!!!

Interesting with the link to the Foreign Legion Wines, they have their own Vineyard and veteran Legionaires work in the vineyard, not sure if any can work there or the injured/retired?!
 
#16
Gundulph said:
Interesting with the link to the Foreign Legion Wines, they have their own Vineyard and veteran Legionaires work in the vineyard, not sure if any can work there or the injured/retired?!
Having visited, it was pleasing to learn that they have a nice retirement village in the South of France for the disabled and wounded. They also have holiday homes were veterans can spend time.
 
#17
Galileo82 said:
RED: I know Calafornia is not famous for its wines
Come again??!! Mondavi, Ridge, Heitz, Caymus, Clos du Val, Chimney Rock, Stag's Leap, Screaming Eagle ... do you want me to go on? California continues to make some of the greatest and most celebrated reds in the world. The problem, as ever, is the price, especially in the UK, where anything costing less than £15 is usually mediocre at best (think Gallo). If you really want to know what sublime Californian wine can taste like, sell your car and buy a case of 12 to 15-yr-old Mondavi Reserve Cab Sauv or (a bit younger) Pinot Noir. You'll be poorer but happier at the end of it.

On a more realistic note, Lidl are still stocking their Rioja Gran Reserva (01 or 02) at about £4.50. Lovely wine, not the greatest but smooth and really tasty, at its peak now and terrific value for money, with most GRs going for at least £10 elsewhere. And Asda have a beautifully rich Extra Special Primitivo di Puglia (05 or 06), a dark red from the heel of Italy, at £6 or so - a real treat (and sometimes sold at £10 for three). Both highly recommended, and both from outlets generally sneered at by wine snobs (more fool they).
 
#18
I don't drink very much these days, makes me do stupid things! But when I do enjoy a glass of red wine I like it to be a glass of Wolf Blass. Especially the one in the green and silver bottle. Absolutely lush!

Recently Wolf Blass have won the International Red Winemaker of the Year 2008 at the International Wine Challenge (IWC) in London.

Give them a try, you won't (hopefully!) be disappointed.

:wink:
 
#19
Democritus said:
Galileo82 said:
RED: I know Calafornia is not famous for its wines
Come again??!! Mondavi, Ridge, Heitz, Caymus, Clos du Val, Chimney Rock, Stag's Leap, Screaming Eagle ... do you want me to go on? California continues to make some of the greatest and most celebrated reds in the world. The problem, as ever, is the price, especially in the UK, where anything costing less than £15 is usually mediocre at best (think Gallo). If you really want to know what sublime Californian wine can taste like, sell your car and buy a case of 12 to 15-yr-old Mondavi Reserve Cab Sauv or (a bit younger) Pinot Noir. You'll be poorer but happier at the end of it.

On a more realistic note, Lidl are still stocking their Rioja Gran Reserva (01 or 02) at about £4.50. Lovely wine, not the greatest but smooth and really tasty, at its peak now and terrific value for money, with most GRs going for at least £10 elsewhere. And Asda have a beautifully rich Extra Special Primitivo di Puglia (05 or 06), a dark red from the heel of Italy, at £6 or so - a real treat (and sometimes sold at £10 for three). Both highly recommended, and both from outlets generally sneered at by wine snobs (more fool they).
I stand corrected.
 
#20
Wishful_Thinking said:
I do enjoy a glass of red wine I like it to be a glass of Wolf Blass. Especially the one in the green and silver bottle. Absolutely lush!
Trouble is, Wolf Blass is a brand, not a product.

Brands are generic names that try to create a feeling of loyalty to everything that carries that name. Brand owners tend to offer an all enveloping "brand promise" that is supposed to cover all their products, no matter what they are. Dunhill is a good example. They make fags, but they also want you to buy lighters, clothes, fragrance etc simply on the strength of the name. They therefore seek to develop their "brand promise" into a detailed statement on the values, characteristics and behaviour of their brand, which you, the consumer, are supposed to fall for (or "identify with").

Once you have identified with the brand, you should then (the theory goes) buy all their products, simply on the strength of the name, rather than the quality of the product.

Unfortunately in the world of wine, as in so many other areas of modern life, brand is becoming everything, and multinationals are taking over the world.

Sorry to go off on one. Rant over (at least for now!).
 

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