Windrush Scandal

[Q


Remember to also about 120,00 Poles were resettled in the UK being reluctant to return to the Communist state, they faced as much prejudice and hatred as the Afro Caribs

But hang on this was orchestrated by Communists, Unions and their assorted left wing followers, may be they should get an apolgy and a day off? Also 24,000 German POWs asked to stay for same reason as Poles - can we have a Boxhead Day offalso?
Hmm Polish and German beer to celebrate, I'd vote for that
 
I never got that, history is everyones regardless of colour, anything else is racist!
In an ideal world, yes. How many schools prior to - let's pluck a historically-speaking recent date out of thin air - 1980 would have taught what Empire felt like from an Indian or Kenyan perspective.

History may be everyone's, history books and history lessons belong to whoever gets to write them.
 
[Q


Remember to also about 120,00 Poles were resettled in the UK being reluctant to return to the Communist state, they faced as much prejudice and hatred as the Afro Caribs

But hang on this was orchestrated by Communists, Unions and their assorted left wing followers, may be they should get an apolgy and a day off? Also 24,000 German POWs asked to stay for same reason as Poles - can we have a Boxhead Day offalso?
absolutely.
I never got that, history is everyones regardless of colour, anything else is racist!
Admirably put. I feel like screaming some days when I hear that patronising crap on the radio. There were Black people here in the 17th/18th century when white people were sentenced to penal slavery in the colonies but in our suffocating self flagelation we conveniently forget so much, like African and ME slavers who took it as their right to sell their people. This country has in fact turned racist.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
In an ideal world, yes. How many schools prior to - let's pluck a historically-speaking recent date out of thin air - 1980 would have taught what Empire felt like from an Indian or Kenyan perspective.

History may be everyone's, history books and history lessons belong to whoever gets to write them.
I would have thought that those schools in Kenya or India would. We are British, the subjects taught to my kids were obtuse to say the least. Lakota Indians?
 
I would have thought that those schools in Kenya or India would.
Based on the Kenyan ones I've seen (I haven't seen any from the days of Empire that were used to teach Indians), they didn't get taught much about their place in the world and what they did started and stopped with, "Consider yourselves damned lucky we chose to colonise you!"

What being colonised did to existing social structures and how they went from who they were before to who they were then - nothing.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Based on the Kenyan ones I've seen (I haven't seen any from the days of Empire that were used to teach Indians), they didn't get taught much about their place in the world and what they did started and stopped with, "Consider yourselves damned lucky we chose to colonise you!"

What being colonised did to existing social structures and how they went from who they were before to who they were then - nothing.
No that would be then, history now is then, I doubt even the laziest education official would pass such a text nowadays?
 
No that would be then, history now is then, I doubt even the laziest education official would pass such a text nowadays?
Compare to the equivalent texts in use in British classrooms - Empire was taken equally for granted but there was at least a description of what went before and how the one came to be the other.

For the colonies, their history before us just didn't exist in their classrooms.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
My question was in regard to what is taught now by Kenyans and Indians!
 
My question was in regard to what is taught now by Kenyans and Indians!
Wouldn't that rebut your assertion that history is everybody's history?

If they teach differently to us, clearly it's not.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Wouldn't that rebut your assertion that history is everybody's history?

If they teach differently to us, clearly it's not.
No it was in response to who writes history comment, my point still stands!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
There is only limited syllabus time for any subject. For History in British schools, it should be about how we came to be where we are, focused on the major trends and events and leading personalities of the time (such as H VIII and the Reformation, or Pitt and the wars with France or WSC and WW2 etc. How other places like Africa got on, irrelevant - as is all the nonsense about dressing up as a chimney-sweeping kid and so forth. The only foreign stuff needed is where an event such as the Fr or Russian revolution affected UK, for instance how come we had to bleed ourselves white TWICE to save Europe from itself in the first half of the twentieth century, and how we had then to use our wealth, not for ourselves, but to contain with armed force the appalling Evil Empire of the East.
 
No it was in response to who writes history comment, my point still stands!
I must be missing your point, in which case my apologies.

As to teaching the history of the Lacota Indians, I can see some advantages depending on what the object is.

If it's to teach how to analyse history, an episode we had no involvement in as a nation is probably a good vehicle since there's little chance if any preconceived notions or emotional attachment to one version or another. You'll have seen that sort of thing in the teaching of Irish history in NI.

On the other hand, if the sole object of history lessons is to put across the official version of history or the received version of events then it's going to be at odds with someone else's version. At best it will be an incomplete picture and at worst outright propagandising. Again, you'll have seen the sort of thing in NI.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I must be missing your point, in which case my apologies.
No worries, History is about everyone but when there is so little time in school it really needs to be targeted at having some relevance to our own nation and why we are where we are, however the trendy right on teachers will dumb it down!
 
History is about everyone but when there is so little time in school it really needs to be targeted at having some relevance to our own nation and why we are where we are
I think that's the point where history breaks down into histories, the point at which people decide what's most relevant.

That's a big enough fracture point right there, even if there was some agreed objective criteria for deciding what it should be relevant to. Taking an example from my own experience, I was taught about the Norman Conquest in some detail but very little about period of the Unions of Crowns and Parliaments. Today I struggle to see how the former is more relevant than the latter to how we came to be as we are as a nation.
 
Based on the Kenyan ones I've seen (I haven't seen any from the days of Empire that were used to teach Indians), they didn't get taught much about their place in the world and what they did started and stopped with, "Consider yourselves damned lucky we chose to colonise you!"

What being colonised did to existing social structures and how they went from who they were before to who they were then - nothing.

When were you last in a Kenyan school?
 
When were you last in a Kenyan school?
I've never been in a Kenyan school. I am an active researcher in comparative education, amongst other things, and the textbooks are on record in a variety of places other than Kenyan schools.

I picked that example because it was one I was familiar with through previous research.
 
I see there was a service of celebration at Westminster Abbey last week so TMPM et al could show how much they care for and respect the Windrush generation.

I wonder when that was scheduled? Years ago or in the last couple of months?

What do you think?
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top