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Windrush Scandal

Indeed, but are actually far more authoritative and detailed records than the lost landing cards.
Not if you are not on them,
A lot of those in contention came to UK as children, it was normal practice for children not to accompany their parents when the parents migrated, but to join them later, most often by air. BOT records only go up to c1960.
 
Not if you are not on them,
A lot of those in contention came to UK as children, it was normal practice for children not to accompany their parents when the parents migrated, but to join them later, most often by air. BOT records only go up to c1960.
None of my assorted Commonwealth relatives or their families came to the UK by plane. You came on a subsidised ticket by boat. Air travel was blisteringly expensive in the 50’s/60’s.
Anyone coming by plane later would have been the better off, the ones that by and large didn’t fall through the cracks.

FWIW, there are no air travel records either after 1960 either, they were not retained records.
 
None of my assorted Commonwealth relatives or their families came to the UK by plane. You came on a subsidised ticket by boat. Air travel was blisteringly expensive in the 50’s/60’s.
Anyone coming by plane later would have been the better off, the ones that by and large didn’t fall through the cracks.
Really?
JamaicanAirArrival.png
 
"Now chaps!
No need for the long faces what what?
Soon you'll be doing meaningful work and you can look forward to unquestioned permanent residence, and bright future for your children & grandchildren, protected by HM Gov and all that jolly stuff.
Now, run along and stay out of trouble."

On the other hand.......
1524311042084.png
 
To be fair, that lot look quite well heeled, if you pardon the pun.
If you look at some of the arrivals from the Windrush you will see that the men and women were very smartly dressed, much more so than the average English person of that age.
This is still reflected in in that generation to this day. My former next door neighbour (ex RAF Cpl from Jamaica RIP) was one of the smartest people I ever knew. He always wore a tie and when he went out it was suit, overcoat, trilby and very highly polished shoes, his mates dressed the same.
My wife's family (St Kitts Windrush 1st generation English) retain that tradition of smartness to this day.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
"Now chaps!
No need for the long faces what what?
Soon you'll be doing meaningful work and you can look forward to unquestioned permanent residence, and bright future for your children & grandchildren, protected by HM Gov and all that jolly stuff.
Now, run along and stay out of trouble."

On the other hand.......
View attachment 331718
Why are the RAF there, recruiting party?
 
Why are the RAF there, recruiting party?
Probably, one of the officers (Flying Officer?) with the navigator's brevet is Afro/Caribbean.
My late next door neighbour from Jamaica was an LAC during WW2 and was discharged home in 1946, he came back on the Windrush in 1948/49 and immediately re-enlisted in the RAF and finished his time as a Cpl.
Apparently re-enlistments in the RAF were quite popular amongst these blokes for whatever reason.
 
Probably, one of the officers (Flying Officer?) with the navigator's brevet is Afro/Caribbean.
My late next door neighbour from Jamaica was an LAC during WW2 and was discharged home in 1946, he came back on the Windrush in 1948/49 and immediately re-enlisted in the RAF and finished his time as a Cpl.
Apparently re-enlistments in the RAF were quite popular amongst these blokes for whatever reason.
West Indies personnel recruited circa 1944 by the RAF even had distinctive service numbers starting with 7 if my memory is correct. They were required to return to West Indies on demob, which large numbers did not want to do, hence their return to UK asap. RAF was seen as good employer, married quarters provided, steady income etc, RAF had quite a lot up to 1960's. Active recruiting in West Indies 1944 was due to accute manpower shortages in UK due to that stage of the war.

The Second World War 1939 to 1945 : Recruitment
 
Probably, one of the officers (Flying Officer?) with the navigator's brevet is Afro/Caribbean.
My late next door neighbour from Jamaica was an LAC during WW2 and was discharged home in 1946, he came back on the Windrush in 1948/49 and immediately re-enlisted in the RAF and finished his time as a Cpl.
Apparently re-enlistments in the RAF were quite popular amongst these blokes for whatever reason.
Stout, rather scruffy Officer nearest camera is wearing armband of RAF Provost Officer (RAF Police).
 
Is he not wearing the armband of a RAF Movements Officer?
That's what I was wondering.
I thought that RAF Provost Officers wore some type of 'winged' device on each lapel in the style of army collar dogs which appear to be absent if you look at the white officer closely.

Edit; I think I am wrong about the 'winged' device on the lapels as a Google search shows no evidence of this.
I had a vague memory of something from a telly programme years ago.
However, RAF Police Officers appear to wear the armband on the left sleeve and they tend to identify as RAFP so I think the Flt/Lt is indeed a mover of some type.
Incidentally, who would want to be met by the RAFP just after getting off a long cruise prior to re-enlistment in the RAF, I think I would have got back onboard and gone back.
 
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If you look at some of the arrivals from the Windrush you will see that the men and women were very smartly dressed, much more so than the average English person of that age.
This is still reflected in in that generation to this day. My former next door neighbour (ex RAF Cpl from Jamaica RIP) was one of the smartest people I ever knew. He always wore a tie and when he went out it was suit, overcoat, trilby and very highly polished shoes, his mates dressed the same.
My wife's family (St Kitts Windrush 1st generation English) retain that tradition of smartness to this day.
What a difference the Windrush generation were compared to the current crop of "immigrants" .
Hardworking decent people determined to make a success of the opportunity given to them.
 

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