Windows 11 is coming, but not for old hardware.

I have a couple of older systems for legacy stuff, mainly EOBD and mobile phone unbricking. I tried the VM route, but some drivers don't react quickly enough through the host, and processes time out.

Dual boot would probably work, but it's easier to just have an extra machine or two. Secondhand laptops are cheap as chips (or sometimes even free)
 
My dual boot machine is Win7 / Linux.

The legacy software is a CAD programme and an explosion modelling program which doesn't like being run in a virtual machine as the security is via a dongle which seems to cause issues.

Replacing the software would cost just short of £10k - assuming that we could get a direct compatible replacement.. We actually have a spare Win 7 license just in case!
I guessed you must have something highly specific but for the average user there's no real reason not to have Windows 10.
 
As I understand it, more security is a major factor.

TPM means that even if someone elsewhere has your log in information they wont have the hardware crypto from your TPM enabled device.

TPM has nothing to do with proving who you are. It's a chain of custody for the OS and hardware - that is it's designed to ensure that the OS that is loaded hasn't been tampered with.
 
TPM has nothing to do with proving who you are. It's a chain of custody for the OS and hardware - that is it's designed to ensure that the OS that is loaded hasn't been tampered with.

"If there’s a problem with the key—perhaps a hacker stole your laptop and tried to tamper with the encrypted drive inside—your PC won’t boot up."
 

"If there’s a problem with the key—perhaps a hacker stole your laptop and tried to tamper with the encrypted drive inside—your PC won’t boot up."
Yes. That's what I said.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I guessed you must have something highly specific but for the average user there's no real reason not to have Windows 10.
True enough.

However, my job requires the use of specialist software and I have a MPhil in Computer Modelling so I'm definitely not an average user.

In one of my previous jobs, I used to be given new beta test versions of the company's in-house engineering software on the basis that if I couldn't break it, none of the ordinary users would. The lady responsible for rolling the sotware out would periodically march into my office waving a disk and demanding access to my PC to load up the latest pre-release version. I was then expected to flag up any usage issues or bugs.

At the moment, I have a Win7 laptop and a Win7 desktop which I expect will see me through to retirement. If they break, then I know a man who has some spare licenses.
 
TPM has nothing to do with proving who you are.


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Yes. That's what I said.

Yeah.
 
It can provide a key store. That's no more proving who you say you are then the lock on your front door does.

Having a biometric system, that then stores information in a TPM module might fit that bill.
OK if I go with the views of multiple tech sites versus a guy posting on Arrse?
 
True enough.

However, my job requires the use of specialist software and I have a MPhil in Computer Modelling so I'm definitely not an average user.

In one of my previous jobs, I used to be given new beta test versions of the company's in-house engineering software on the basis that if I couldn't break it, none of the ordinary users would. The lady responsible for rolling the sotware out would periodically march into my office waving a disk and demanding access to my PC to load up the latest pre-release version. I was then expected to flag up any usage issues or bugs.

At the moment, I have a Win7 laptop and a Win7 desktop which I expect will see me through to retirement. If they break, then I know a man who has some spare licenses.
Do like the Nerds do on You Tube; create the ultimate Win 98 (SE) machine. I have a spare genuine Microsoft copy of Win 98 (SE) and Office 97 if I really want to go back.

 

RTU'd

LE
My motherboard has a TPM header on it.
And the BIOS has been replaced by Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI).
So on paper it looks all very easy to do, But Windows 10 will be supported for a few more years yet.
 
It doesn't. You'll have to take my word for it, but I have a little IT experience.
So do I. I started with PCs since the days of DOS. Studied PCs and programing with the OU. That was using Smalltalk.


I built three PCs for the house while in lockdown last year. One in the living room, one as a games machine in the bedroom and then one for the kid. Then this year I updated the NAS drive.
 
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My motherboard has a TPM header on it.
And the BIOS has been replaced by Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI).
So on paper it looks all very easy to do, But Windows 10 will be supported for a few more years yet.
In the UEFI it may be called Intel Platform Trust Technology or FTPM (Firmware Trusted Platform Module) or even PSP (Platform Security Processor).

Probably in the advanced settings. Find it and then enable and save changes.

On my motherboards it has tended to be off by default.
 

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