Will you raise a glass tonight 5th june, at 23:16...

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
About 40 years ago.
Short version. Finished an M Phil paper, cycled into town. Didn’t knock my head off on the low beam as you enter the bar. Ordered a pint , talking to the barman about the state of Guinness.
Chap beside me ‘
‘Irish’?
‘Sort of’
Come and join us. I did, and found myself at a table of blazered and tied Greenjackets.
‘Oh ****’ I checked the badges so when I woke up in hospital I could give a description.
Some of the old ones (they were the same age then as I am now) Ox and Bucks.
I lifted my pint.
‘Op Deadstick. It’s a pleasure’.

We were locked in. I was poured home in a taxi and picked the bike up three days later.


Originally posted this day(ish) in 2019 (I think) An edited version of a longer one.
 
Sorry being old I referred to the original Grand Dame a formidable and gracious woman
The current Mme Gondrée isn't far behind in the formidable stakes. HCSC started the (old version) of the end of course Staff Ride by rolling off the ferry and heading straight for Pegasus Bridge, arriving at the cafe just after opening time. We were expected.

We dutifully trooped in to be met by a delighted Mme Gondrée and promptly escorted to the back room to be fed what appeared to be an endless breakfast. A tourist arrived and made the mistake of attempting to join us - 'Shoo! Shoo! You are not a British soldier! You are not the successors to those who defeated les Boches!' Stefan, the Luftwaffe Tornado pilot on the course, kept very, very quiet and just carried on munching his breakfast...
 
Slainte (Glen Deveron 16 for me)! Brave men all.
 
Happy 76th D-Day vets

Thanks for your efforts & sacrifices

cf851fd4-a2fb-4cad-8f8c-f46ae6445b4c.jpg


 
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soleil

War Hero
I would like to tap into the experts on here about something that has been niggling for a while. When we go down to our house in the Charente, we usually stop off for the night in Rennes as it is about half way. As Newhaven is tidal, the departure of the morning ferry can vary by a couple of hours, so if it is later, we stop at the Campanile in Vire, in Normandy. Just before Vire, at St Charles de Percy, there is a British War Cemetery, with 700 graves, mostly Irish Guardsmen. Vire is quite far inland and is west of Caen, and I would not have thought that the fighting would have got that far down by then, although most of the deaths were August 1944. Can anyone enlighten me as to the action(s) which caused these casualties?
 
Raising a glass to the men of the 6th Airborne Division.

Cheers. Airborne.
 
The current Mme Gondrée isn't far behind in the formidable stakes. HCSC started the (old version) of the end of course Staff Ride by rolling off the ferry and heading straight for Pegasus Bridge, arriving at the cafe just after opening time. We were expected.

We dutifully trooped in to be met by a delighted Mme Gondrée and promptly escorted to the back room to be fed what appeared to be an endless breakfast. A tourist arrived and made the mistake of attempting to join us - 'Shoo! Shoo! You are not a British soldier! You are not the successors to those who defeated les Boches!' Stefan, the Luftwaffe Tornado pilot on the course, kept very, very quiet and just carried on munching his breakfast...
In the early 90's an oppo and myself arrived at the cafe Gondree mid afternoon. We wandered in and started looking around, vaguely aware of some raised voices. Mmme Gondree was arguing with three French guys. She shoed them out of the cafe and then turned to me thinking I was with them, and let out a stream of French (way too quick for me to understand). I answered as best I could explaining I didn't understand and could she speak a bit slower.
She immediately broke into English, appologised and sat us down. Once we explained we were military and were on a bit of a pilgrimage, we were very well treated. We even managed to stick our zap on the cafe door (there were hundreds) and I bought a book on the landings from the little shop stamped with the cafe Gondree stamp.
 
I would like to tap into the experts on here about something that has been niggling for a while. When we go down to our house in the Charente, we usually stop off for the night in Rennes as it is about half way. As Newhaven is tidal, the departure of the morning ferry can vary by a couple of hours, so if it is later, we stop at the Campanile in Vire, in Normandy. Just before Vire, at St Charles de Percy, there is a British War Cemetery, with 700 graves, mostly Irish Guardsmen. Vire is quite far inland and is west of Caen, and I would not have thought that the fighting would have got that far down by then, although most of the deaths were August 1944. Can anyone enlighten me as to the action(s) which caused these casualties?
IIRC it was Guards Armoured Div on Op Bluecoat and the lesser known Op Grouse.
 
Not a glass as at work. But a tin mug of tea, and ham and jam sandwiches.

oxbucks - Copy - Copy.jpg
 
Not a glass as at work. But a tin mug of tea, and ham and jam sandwiches.

View attachment 479792
What movie is that?

Anyone seen this one?

 
What movie is that?

Anyone seen this one?

The Longest Day. Its the scene where the Ox & Bucks have just secured the bridge (Pegasus)
 
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The Longest Day. Its the scene where the Ox & Bucks have just secured the bridge (Pegsus)
Been ages since I've seen that, Like 35+ years ages, isisn't it like 3+ hours long?
 
I would like to tap into the experts on here about something that has been niggling for a while. When we go down to our house in the Charente, we usually stop off for the night in Rennes as it is about half way. As Newhaven is tidal, the departure of the morning ferry can vary by a couple of hours, so if it is later, we stop at the Campanile in Vire, in Normandy. Just before Vire, at St Charles de Percy, there is a British War Cemetery, with 700 graves, mostly Irish Guardsmen. Vire is quite far inland and is west of Caen, and I would not have thought that the fighting would have got that far down by then, although most of the deaths were August 1944. Can anyone enlighten me as to the action(s) which caused these casualties?
It's at the southern end of the Operation BLUECOAT salient. 15th (Scottish) Division and 6th Guards Tank Brigade kicked the door in at St Martin des Besaces, where there is a very nice little museum (just ask them to switch all the lights on, switch off the bloody sound and light show off and let you go through at your own pace). They beat off a counter attack from the east by 21 Panzer Division (including some beastly King Tigers and Jagdpanthers) and moved aside to let Guards Armoured Division break through.

In the meantime, 7th Armoured Division found it hard going to the east, running into elements of 10th SS Panzer Division just west of Aunay-sur-Odon. 50th (Northumbrian) Division meanwhile, struggled to make headway on their left into heavily-fortified Villers-Bocage.

11th Armoured Division had better luck to the west however, using an unguarded bridge over the Soulevre (discovered by the 11th Hussars) and breaking out through Le Beny-Bocage towards Vire and driving a wedge between two German corps. Guards Armoured Division then pushed south, crossed the Soulevre at Catheolles and linked up with 11th Armoured Division at La Ferroniere, which was mis-labelled on British maps as St Charles de Percy (which is actually about a mile east of La Ferroniere).

11th Armoured Division's drive on Vire was blunted first by command-confusion between VIII Corps and the neighbouring US Corps (who reckoned that Vire was on their side of the inter-army boundary), then by Kampfgruppe 'Weiss' (102 SS Heavy Panzer Battalion, plus attachments), who managed to insert themselves into the critical point at the pivotal moment. 11th Armoured Division managed to cross the Vire-Vassy highway at Chendolle and were in the process of being reinforced by 3rd Infantry Division, when they came under intense counter-attack by 9th SS Panzer Division (who also put in strong counter-attacks against Guards Armoured Division around St Charles de Percy) and finally stopped Operation BLUECOAT in its tracks.

If you have five minutes to spare, there is a nice memorial to Sidney Bates VC of the Norfolks, just to the west of Chendolle, east of Vire. He was part of the 'NorMons' Group (half Norfolks of 3rd Inf Div, who were conducting a relief-in-place of the Monmouths of 11th Armd Div when they came under strong attack from 10th SS).
 
As I have posted before on another thread some time ago there was a Russian Mission to Normandy on D Day ... honoured by a march past of Paras ... and a walkabout presumably of some of the key areas of action ... would like to believe they were taken to Pegasus Bridge ... there are scenes depicting landed Gliders but I cannot confirm their location ...

 

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