Will they ever really parachute people into battle again?

Discussion in 'The ARRSE Hole' started by Chimpy., May 17, 2007.

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  1. If not then what's the point in the paras? I hear they mainly go about by helecopter these days, so why not call them the helicopter regiment instead? Is there really any call for parachute training these days or is it just a tradition that's being held on to?

    And while we're at it, when was the last time the household cavalry rode into battle on horseback? I think the British army needs to start being more forward thinking and start thinking about what is actually usefull training to spend tax payers money on. Why train people to jump out of planes when they most likely will never be deployed into a combat scenario by parachute in today's wars?
     
  2. Give me strength...................... Root around in the forums long enough and you will be able to find reams of posts on this topic. Do try to be original when you post.
     
  3. Because you never know when you will need the capability again and it would be incredibly difficult to regain the capability once it had been given up.

    As for the HCMR, they are a ceremonial unit that, if for no other reason, is very beneficial for the country on the tourism side. Besides which, the cavalry did use mounted patrols in Bosnia IIRC.
     
  4. FFS Not again............... The Helicopter Regiment? 8O Great idea mate, Im sure the lads will love it. PM that idea to Fallchrimjaeger or Sandy the Guvnor and see what they come back with. :twisted:
     
  5. I'm not even going to bite!

    Chimpy are you bored this afternoon, shouldn't you be out on some secret SAS mission?!
     
  6. Or are you just a total knobber?
     
  7. There are several thousand recently minted mustard stains on the jumpwings of men in American airborne formations Chimpy as they conducted drops during OEF and OIF. Air assault forces (via helicopter) possess tactical mobility but paratroopers provide a strategic assett capable of force projection anywhere on the globe.
     
  8. grab a granny night...next para jump........chute...WW2 bloomers.....just like the old PC8......grab a granny and have a jump!!!!!
     
  9. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    Come on chimpy surely light infantry should all weigh under 10 stone?
     
  10. Are you kidding me? You want me to waste my own time trawling through the forums on the off chance that there might be a similar thread about it? Not gonna happen.

    Anyway, when was the last time troops were parachuted into battle? Was it WW2?

    BTW - I saw that thing where the yanks parachuted into the desert but that was just for show. They didn't exactly land on top of the enemy and start fighting straight away. They could have easily just have been taken down by helecopter.

    The Helecopter Regiment is a more apt name because that's how the paras get about these days innit!
     
  11. ugly

    ugly LE Moderator

    Yes why project a force with only light weapons that has to have the DZ secured by the locals.
     
  12. Sierra Leonne (spelling and cant be arrsed) (2 Sqn RAF Regt) if literature is to be believed!! (2002) I think
     
  13. Who are they?
     
  14. Rangers conducted several drops in both places... one you might most familiar with was the battalion drop on Khandahar. The 173rd's mission was to secure an FLS at Bashar and provide a blocking force to retain the assett... the Iraqi forces in the region chose not to advance on them.

    Last large scale combat jump? When the 75th conducted a low level drop onto Rio Hato and Torrijos during Just Cause in 1989. Before you think to question that, I suggest you look up the name Phillip Lear. He was a damned good man who was killed by enemy fire not long after we landed.
     
  15. You'll find out in due course I expect when Fallchrimjaeger reads this post.

    Promise us you'll grow up eh Chimpy, there's a good boy.

    BT. 8O