Will the government car emissions proposals affect your next car purchase .....

If all new cars must have zero emissions by 2035 will that affect your next car purchase choice ?

  • Nope I`m not worried, depreciation wont change from what it is now.

  • Yes , I`m looking at electric cars already.

  • I run old bangers and couldn`t give a fcuk.

  • I`ll be dead by 2035 so dont care.

  • Fcuk the planet show me the V8 .


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Cities are already legislating them out. Oxford starts its zero emission zone this year.
As far as I can make out Oxford’s ZEZ consists of streets which are pedestrianised! The only vehicles which use them are the emergency services, and delivery and service lorries. Oh, and buses in Queen Street- possibly the oddest “pedestrianisation” effort ever! If the City Council had any balls they’d include The High, St. Aldates, St. Giles, Beaumont Street, Worcester Street, Hythe Bridge Street, Park End Street, New Road and Castle Street. Turn the Worcester Street car park, the far end of St. Giles and The Plain into electric tram termini and **** the buses off completely.
 

Tyk

LE
Its much cheaper to run an EV than it is a diesel/petrol,


Once most people realise how much they save they will be a bit more eager to go electric, although the Government might add taxes on electricity.

In Norway, electric cars were exempt tolls (which can add up to 150 quid a month), I think they pay half price now, but still a big incentive.

As petrol stations start to close in the UK, people will be forced to switch to electric.
Norway has a gigantic over capacity of Hydro generation, to the point they export lots of electricity, the UK most definitely does not, in fact we're not that far off having a shortage for current demand. Start pouring it into batteries and it's going to be a big problem, not ignoring the fact that a lot of houses, flats, workplaces and hotels could never install charging points.
EV's may be cheaper to fuel currently, but that's sure as eggs going to change HMG will not wish to lose the very significant tax take that petrol and diesel produces, there's no doubt that the slack will be taken up at recharging points.
There's also the very significant issue of range on EV's, charging times and battery disposal. The current batteries are made from some quite nasty materials, there's got to be a sensible recycling approach or we're going to be facing some interesting problems which will probably see millions dumped in poor parts of the world like we have with plastics and other "recyclables" that the West tends to ship off to be someone else's problem.
 
My sisters ex-fella, his little brothers mate, one with the pit-bull, he's got a Beema and it's way better than your mates. It's got a spoiler bigger than Mr T's cock and it's got a dump valve an all so he would defo batter you in a drag race you pence pest bell end. Swear down.
 

aardvark64

Old-Salt
I agree with Stacker (goddamn it) the petrol stations will either close or diversify into fast-charge stations. Four star petrol disappeared bloody quickly and those of us who used the stuff were either lucky enough to live near one of the few (Bayford Thrust iirc) garages allowed to sell it, compulsively measured valve clearances in anticipation of the dreaded valve seat recession, or simply bit the bullet and bought expensive peace of mind with unleaded cylinder heads.
Or put a small dose of lead additive into every fill-up. :boogie:
 

Robme

On ROPS
On ROPs
Like dingerr, I too get a free car every 3 years.
However aside from the reality of this politico bow-locks, is that nobody is going to be affected, as this muppet idea will die a death. When the Government realise that according to people who really do know about electric capacity unlike them, that we would need 12 additional nuclear power stations or 15 massive kilowatt windrurbines per sq km of the Country just to provide sufficient power for 85% of the countries current driving capacity. Leaving aside the reality that we haven’t built any sufficient energy capacity for the last 40 years, and current forecasting will see even more shed-loads of cars on the road.
Moreover and given that a totally electric cars run their heating for passengers from the same batteries that drive the car. Will the government be providing hearses along side breakdown vehicles when the inevitable 4 hour traffic snarl up on our motorway system in winter, causes the occupants to die of hypothermia? Bearing in mind, that the M62, doesn't do mear 4hr snarl ups, but tends to favour all-nighters?
 
Like dingerr, I too get a free car every 3 years.
However aside from the reality of this politico bow-locks, is that nobody is going to be affected, as this muppet idea will die a death. When the Government realise that according to people who really do know about electric capacity unlike them, that we would need 12 additional nuclear power stations or 15 massive kilowatt windrurbines per sq km of the Country just to provide sufficient power for 85% of the countries current driving capacity. Leaving aside the reality that we haven’t built any sufficient energy capacity for the last 40 years, and current forecasting will see even more shed-loads of cars on the road.
Moreover and given that a totally electric cars run their heating for passengers from the same batteries that drive the car. Will the government be providing hearses along side breakdown vehicles when the inevitable 4 hour traffic snarl up on our motorway system in winter, causes the occupants to die of hypothermia? Bearing in mind, that the M62, doesn't do mear 4hr snarl ups, but tends to favour all-nighters?
As big an issue is any expansion in the national grid system, planning would be hard pushed to allow any large pylons lines through as everything not built on seems to be an AONB these days. Its the major limit with new Nuclear - it needs some where to plug into and the old Coal fired stations at the end of existing lines that haven't been converted to biomass aren't in the remote places peeps like their reactors
 

Fishbulb

Old-Salt
My sisters ex-fella, his little brothers mate, one with the pit-bull, he's got a Beema and it's way better than your mates. It's got a spoiler bigger than Mr T's cock and it's got a dump valve an all so he would defo batter you in a drag race you pence pest bell end. Swear down.
Rrrrrrrrrrespec'
 

jg505

Old-Salt
We're just about to trade in our two diesel Ford's for one 2018 diesel Ford; now I'm officially retired we only need one car.

Apparently, if driven correctly, it has the capability of giving 70+ mpg. We've decided that, god willing, this will be our last diesel/petrol car, we plan to run it for at least the next 10 years. After that, we'll see how the electric car has improved and probably change over then.

Some interesting points made in this thread, regarding the loss of tax income from the sale of diesel/petrol. No doubt, the government will need to make this up some other way.
 
I've just spend a reasonable wedge on a motor and expect the manufacturers will do something to ease the pain in terms of buy back/trade in on newish cars. I half wonder if we will see a chassis that can be 'converted', but that may not be realistic. Government will probably do a scheme like the last one where you got 2k on a trade in - the tax payer will pay....

I'm only planning to keep my motor for a maximum of two years and will think long and hard about my next purchase.

The Defender will probably still be running quite merrily in 2035 - I'll be 70 if I make it that far and I expect I'll be in a driverless car by then anyway. Probably senile and wont have a clue what's going on anyway so who gives one
 

OneTenner

War Hero
I do wonder how there will be anything like enough charging points by the time this comes about and more than that where the generating capacity to supply the charging demand will come from.
Electric motors are fine, but fuelling is going to be a bitch.

I expect some punitive taxing to force people to change from hydrocarbon feeding cars.
It's not just the generating capacity, I regularly use a car park on a commercial / industrial estate that has 520 spaces, of those, there are 8 EV charging points. Assuming that has to expand to 50% coverage, then it's clear the local infrastructure isn't capable of supporting it, so larger sub-station, distribution cables, larger supply to the substation - add in all the on-site parking at the various businesses that will need charging points for customers, that's a lot of underground infrastructure that'll need upgrading....
 
I imagine Injury Lawyers for You will be making a fortune, just imagine all those terraced streets with trailing leads running out of open windows (so the heating will need to be cranked up) to the EV parked eight doors down/over the road.
It'll be like having low, medium and high wire entanglements across the nation.

I'm already working on my get around for when they ban everything.
An old Series LR/90 with a Cummins diesel. Old enough not to need MOT or tax (thanks HMG) and diesel as I have a Booker card and making your own biodiesel out of veg oil isn't that hard, just getting the methanol in none industrial quantities is problematic. Then again I imagine a cooperative approach will be possible with all these wonderful Government policies.
 

doc80905

War Hero
Picked the bottom option as I already have a V8. The iPace is the only current EV I'd consider acceptable. I'd rather walk than drive a Datsun Leaf, and as has been mentioned, it will be interesting just how the government makes up for the lost revenue from fuel duty.
 
As far as I can make out Oxford’s ZEZ consists of streets which are pedestrianised! The only vehicles which use them are the emergency services, and delivery and service lorries. Oh, and buses in Queen Street- possibly the oddest “pedestrianisation” effort ever! If the City Council had any balls they’d include The High, St. Aldates, St. Giles, Beaumont Street, Worcester Street, Hythe Bridge Street, Park End Street, New Road and Castle Street. Turn the Worcester Street car park, the far end of St. Giles and The Plain into electric tram termini and **** the buses off completely.

Initially yes its quite small but there is a phased plan to progressively expand it.
I have the plan somewhere at work. To start it operates 07.00-19.00 I think

We had a customer ask us what we are going to do to comply. I don't think they liked the response much. I've told them they have two options, they can either staff their delivery point in the early hours or they can pay the daily penalty for putting a diesel vehicle into the zero emission zone
If they don't want to do either then we will cease to supply.

At the moment EV's are not viable for distance delivery, just about viable for last mile in the big cities. Oxford isn't big or important enough for anyone to put the effort and investment in to serve their zero emission zone just yet.
 
I imagine Injury Lawyers for You will be making a fortune, just imagine all those terraced streets with trailing leads running out of open windows (so the heating will need to be cranked up) to the EV parked eight doors down/over the road.
It'll be like having low, medium and high wire entanglements across the nation.
You'd also see pikies running about stealing cables, or local youths uncoupling cars for shits and giggles.

Other problems (at least at current) is that battery charging can be slowed by cold weather. Thus you maybe able to get battery charging done overnight in the summer, but the winter is a different kettle of fish.
Obvious answer is to put them indoors. However, this then enters the problem of battery charging release large amounts of hydrogen.

There's essentially far to many problems with current technology to make the current plan viable. These are through out the plan, from The power station to the individual user. It looks like the Government brought in the target because it sounded nice, and are desperately hoping that technology will improve enough to make the target achievable.
I did briefly consider an Electric, as we've got a driveway behind a fence. Then I came to my senses and went with hydrocarbon.
 
You'd also see pikies running about stealing cables, or local youths uncoupling cars for shits and giggles.

Other problems (at least at current) is that battery charging can be slowed by cold weather. Thus you maybe able to get battery charging done overnight in the summer, but the winter is a different kettle of fish.
Obvious answer is to put them indoors. However, this then enters the problem of battery charging release large amounts of hydrogen.

There's essentially far to many problems with current technology to make the current plan viable. These are through out the plan, from The power station to the individual user. It looks like the Government brought in the target because it sounded nice, and are desperately hoping that technology will improve enough to make the target achievable.
I did briefly consider an Electric, as we've got a driveway behind a fence. Then I came to my senses and went with hydrocarbon.
I'd have to look it up at work (because I'm not an electrician and I've forgotten the numbers) but I think that fast chargers for the vehicles I'm looking at require a 3 phase 32amp supply for each vehicle.
If I understand correctly that means 10 vehicles need 320amps of 3 phase supply
You need that inside or in a secure yard because otherwise you are going to be giving half the county free electrickery
Standard supply in to most of the industrial units I've been looking at is 100amps.

See the problem?

In addition to that, the vehicles are twice the price of diesel and have half the effective range.
I'm actively working on EV last mile distribution but its very expensive and not very efficient.
The consumer will foot the bill.
 
I'd have to look it up at work (because I'm not an electrician and I've forgotten the numbers) but I think that fast chargers for the vehicles I'm looking at require a 3 phase 32amp supply for each vehicle.
If I understand correctly that means 10 vehicles need 320amps of 3 phase supply
You need that inside or in a secure yard because otherwise you are going to be giving half the county free electrickery
Standard supply in to most of the industrial units I've been looking at is 100amps.

See the problem?

In addition to that, the vehicles are twice the price of diesel and have half the effective range.
I'm actively working on EV last mile distribution but its very expensive and not very efficient.
The consumer will foot the bill.
Oh I know, I'm agreeing with you.

The current technology isn't going to meet the legal requirements. The only way I can see it almost working with current tech is removable battery packs. Which raises its own host of issues. MHE (as you'll need a cart for it) on slippery surfaces not adapted for it. Humping them over front door steps etc etc. Then you have the hydrogen gas from charging.

Then you'll get the human factor. Where someone tries to be cheap and use a cheaper battery pack (likely one they own previously) and its MHE to load into their new car, as they brought it second hand.
One WarhouseI worked at, we used 8 of our 9 lives on one incident where someone tried to load a battery into a reach truck, using the wrong equipment. It was amazing how quickly he tobogganed down the side of the Hierarchy of Controls pyramid. It was one of thosei ncidents were he'll survive or die with no middle ground. A 37kwh battery discharged into the side of his reach tuck in three seconds, it was a hell of an explosion.
The only reason why he survived was the controls for the battery cart were far enough away that he didn't get fried.

Loosing that on the general public is goign to result in lots of crispy types.

On the other end Imagine a little old lady trying to wrestle her cart out of her house and load it into her car.
 
I'm looking at a hybrid for the next company car.
All electric won't work for me as the distances I have to travel and many many of these places are presently nowhere near a sodding charging point. I suppose I could carry my generator on a trailer (need the car boot for equipment).
 
I'd have to look it up at work (because I'm not an electrician and I've forgotten the numbers) but I think that fast chargers for the vehicles I'm looking at require a 3 phase 32amp supply for each vehicle.
If I understand correctly that means 10 vehicles need 320amps of 3 phase supply
You need that inside or in a secure yard because otherwise you are going to be giving half the county free electrickery
Standard supply in to most of the industrial units I've been looking at is 100amps.

See the problem?

In addition to that, the vehicles are twice the price of diesel and have half the effective range.
I'm actively working on EV last mile distribution but its very expensive and not very efficient.
The consumer will foot the bill.
3 phase ? that will make the power companies super rich with the cost of a new 3 phase supply.
 

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