Will the government car emissions proposals affect your next car purchase .....

If all new cars must have zero emissions by 2035 will that affect your next car purchase choice ?

  • Nope I`m not worried, depreciation wont change from what it is now.

  • Yes , I`m looking at electric cars already.

  • I run old bangers and couldn`t give a fcuk.

  • I`ll be dead by 2035 so dont care.

  • Fcuk the planet show me the V8 .


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If all new cars have to have zero emissions by 2035 will that affect your next car purchase choice ? so its fifteen years away but will used petrol and diesels values take a massive dive in the next 5 years ?
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
I bought an ex cop car
1 owner 35 not very careful drivers
its diesel and averages 55mpg
surely its better for the environment to keep a car longer
I also cycle or walk when working locally
unlike my neighbour with her x drive BWM that drives 2 miles to work ??
 

endure

GCM
so its fifteen years away but will used petrol and diesels values take a massive dive in the next 5 years ?
On the contrary they'll become more expensive as the crowd who never buy new cars will have fewer cars to choose from over time.
 
On the contrary they'll become more expensive as the crowd who never buy new cars will have fewer cars to choose from over time.
My brother recently bought an M135 BMW and reckons it`ll go up in value as its super fast and its types will soon go out of production , petrol heads will pay a premium he believes.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I've got used to the idea that the car I currently have is the last hydrocarbon car I'll probably have - barring accident.

'14 plate and 25k on the clock. It should run until the electric deadline.
 
Surely the Greenest car is the one you already have.
Yep. I kept my last "main" car for 14 years. Last year, I took the Focus up for its "government" MoT test. As it happened, they waved me straight in, so I didn't turn off the engine. First part of the test is emissions. "Turn your engine back on sir". "It's running, mate, I didn't turn it off" Emissions were so low the fella had to re-adjust the probe. Not bad for a 9 year old Focus with an 1800cc petrol engine.

My parents' car is due its first MoT this year (4 years in NI). It's a 2016 Fiesta with the 1242cc Yamaha engine and 16000 miles on it. I anticipate very low emissions. A lot of this emissions stuff is bullshit.

As an aside, those FoMoCo/Motorcraft brake pads are dirtier than a Motley Crue groupie. Changed to Apec and I'm not cleaning the front rims every 5 minutes anymore.
 

OneTenner

War Hero
As with all 'run-out' models, they will get cheaper and have more kit fitted, making them more affordable to those that don't usually buy new cars... there are a lot of cars on the roads produced fifteen years ago, there's no reason to think that production methods will change enough to reduce the usable lifespan of cars, so theres every likelyhood of petrol & diesel vehicles still being around in numbers to at least 2050. There's also no mention of trucks (heavy plant and other specialist vehicles will still need to be fossil-fuelled), buses, maybe even rural ones, are a great usage case for full EV, in Nottingham there are full EV taxis with induction charging in some taxi ranks. I can see increasing emissions regs and taxation 'incentivising' manufacturers to move to EV only production sooner than 2035, it does need some form of 'carrot' (such a heavy subsidies) to get the traditional second or third hand car buyer to move to EV's. The biggest hurdle is range anxiety, my own vehicle can go up to five hundred miles on a full tank, loaded with up to 1100kg, the current best equivilent can only manage one hundred and fifty miles with the same payload, so with say 10% of range spend diverting to a 'fast' charging station, time spent charging, that's a fair bit of time and 'fuel' overhead for a ~six hundred and thirty mile journey that i'm currently doing up to four times a week...
 

OneTenner

War Hero
I've got used to the idea that the car I currently have is the last hydrocarbon car I'll probably have - barring accident.

'14 plate and 25k on the clock. It should run until the electric deadline.
That's not a 'stop' date, it's a no new hydrocarbon fuelled cars sold beyond this date, date. Unless there is further legislation, any petrol or diesel cars can continue to be used as long as they're able.
 
I have no intention of buying electric for myself.

But at work I am talking to manufacturers about electric fridge vans. I really do not like the idea and I don't think the technology is yet mature enough but I do recognise that it is likely to be the future.
Its a shite idea but Westminster is forcing us down that route.

I don't like it, I don't think its the best idea, but electric is more than likely the future.
 
That's not a 'stop' date, it's a no new hydrocarbon fuelled cars sold beyond this date, date. Unless there is further legislation, any petrol or diesel cars can continue to be used as long as they're able.

Cities are already legislating them out. Oxford starts its zero emission zone this year.
 

Tyk

LE
I do wonder how there will be anything like enough charging points by the time this comes about and more than that where the generating capacity to supply the charging demand will come from.
Electric motors are fine, but fuelling is going to be a bitch.

I expect some punitive taxing to force people to change from hydrocarbon feeding cars.
 
I do wonder how there will be anything like enough charging points by the time this comes about and more than that where the generating capacity to supply the charging demand will come from.
Electric motors are fine, but fuelling is going to be a bitch.

I expect some punitive taxing to force people to change from hydrocarbon feeding cars.

Whilst looking at EV last mile distribution, the electricity supply requirement is quite surprisingly large
 
I do wonder how there will be anything like enough charging points by the time this comes about and more than that where the generating capacity to supply the charging demand will come from.
Electric motors are fine, but fuelling is going to be a bitch.

I expect some punitive taxing to force people to change from hydrocarbon feeding cars.
Its much cheaper to run an EV than it is a diesel/petrol,


Once most people realise how much they save they will be a bit more eager to go electric, although the Government might add taxes on electricity.

In Norway, electric cars were exempt tolls (which can add up to 150 quid a month), I think they pay half price now, but still a big incentive.

As petrol stations start to close in the UK, people will be forced to switch to electric.
 
Yes and no. Yes, because I get my cars free, no because motability change them every 3 years, so I’m probably due 5 more diesels.
 
My brother recently bought an M135 BMW and reckons it`ll go up in value as its super fast and its types will soon go out of production , petrol heads will pay a premium he believes.
might soar in value whilst you can still buy petrol....

the no. of petrol stations has fallen by 35% in the last 20yrs,

& don't forget all that lovely tax on fuel & road tax will have to be made up some where... pay per mile ?
 
I agree with Stacker (goddamn it) the petrol stations will either close or diversify into fast-charge stations. Four star petrol disappeared bloody quickly and those of us who used the stuff were either lucky enough to live near one of the few (Bayford Thrust iirc) garages allowed to sell it, compulsively measured valve clearances in anticipation of the dreaded valve seat recession, or simply bit the bullet and bought expensive peace of mind with unleaded cylinder heads.
 

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