Wild camping in Germany?

#1
I have relatives in Germany, all fairly close in the southern region. Being part Scottish, I don't want to waste euros on hotels and I can't find hostel equivalents in the area I'm looking at.


What is the German attitude to wild camping? If Herr farmer finds me in his field can I expect a friendly conversation or buckshot in the arse? Obviously I'll rock up late and clear off early but wondered if any particularly German sensibilities apply here. After all, I am told it's illegal to mow one's lawn on a Sunday and no-one crosses a road until the little signal turns green.
 
#2
Found a link for you... Wild camping in Europe: where it's allowed and where not

''Camping wherever you like in Germany is illegal. As is applicable in both Austria and Switzerland, a maximum of one night with a caravan on a serviced area is permitted. Otherwise, a one-night stay in camping vehicles, if not marked otherwise, on designated state parking areas is permitted.
Without a tent (e.g bivy sack) you may sleep almost anywhere for a night outside on private property in Germany. Excluded are specially marked areas and nature reserves. Whether an awning or a tarp is to be deemed a tent, lies at the discretion of the local official who’s discovered you. Also a good idea, is to pitch a tent on private land after you’ve gained permission. Normally in rural areas it’s a formality to give a quick knock at the door asking if it would be OK. ''

The green man thing isn't as rigidly observed as it used to be. The older generation still wait patiently but not so much the youth. Also much more running of red lights than the UK I observed recently. Might also depend where you go.
 
#3
Campsites are plentiful and cheap in Germany, pretty much every town and most villages have one or one near by. 7-10 Euros a night will get you something nice with showers and an eatery/bar on site.
The days when you would get a gruff this is naughty if found wild camping are gone, the influx of migrants has hardened attitudes noticeably in the Black Forest where I often camp.
 
#4
Plenty of hostels( Jugendherberge) for cheap accomodation in rural germany , also camping is cheap on the local zeltplatz, as far as not mowing your lawn on sundays , its just to make sure that one day a week you can have a peaceful day at home, between 1300 and 1500 hours any day of the week used to be classed as quiet time too, dont know whether this is is still enforced, not lived in der vaterland for a while
 
#5
Campsites are plentiful and cheap in Germany, pretty much every town and most villages have one or one near by. 7-10 Euros a night will get you something nice with showers and an eatery/bar on site.
The days when you would get a gruff this is naughty if found wild camping are gone, the influx of migrants has hardened attitudes noticeably in the Black Forest where I often camp.
Thanks, this is the sort of thing I was after. Is there any easy way to find campsites? Having just had a quick look on google there's nothing within reasonable distance between the train station and my first stop.

For all the ARRSE millionaires ready to chip in with "just get a taxi", I'm interested in seeing what I can do on my own and actually see some of the countryside.
 
#10
Thanks, this is the sort of thing I was after. Is there any easy way to find campsites? Having just had a quick look on google there's nothing within reasonable distance between the train station and my first stop.

For all the ARRSE millionaires ready to chip in with "just get a taxi", I'm interested in seeing what I can do on my own and actually see some of the countryside.
It is done regularly by bundeswehr mates of mine at weekends. Use a hammock/Bivvy bag, camo tarp and go well enough off the beaten path.

Last time I did it for 5 days 10 years ago I kipped near rural railway stations to use the facilities in the mornings.

If you get caught it depends on the copper, anything from a bollocking to a fine.

Plenty of youth hostels around, I stayed in one in March in Nuremberg for 30 euros a night for a single room with shower and breakfast.
 
#11
It is done regularly by bundeswehr mates of mine at weekends. Use a hammock/Bivvy bag, camo tarp and go well enough off the beaten path.

Last time I did it for 5 days 10 years ago I kipped near rural railway stations to use the facilities in the mornings.

If you get caught it depends on the copper, anything from a bollocking to a fine.

Plenty of youth hostels around, I stayed in one in March in Nuremberg for 30 euros a night for a single room with shower and breakfast.
Thanks. I've had a good look and the only accomodation nearby is a proper hotel that only takes booking in German (excluding me on grounds of money, taste and language). I like the suggestion that other people can bivvy and get away with it - I think I'll risk it and play the ignorant foreigner if caught.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#12
Wild camping, is actually trespassing outside of Scotland
 
#18
Not sure where in southern Germany Ortholith means, but if it's Bavaria they don't even speak German never mind English.
Next door, Baden-Wurttemburg. Given that I can't speak German either we tend to get along quite well with a lot of pointing, shrugging and just gesticulating for another pint of beer (that's the locals, my relatives do speak English or I wouldn't bother going).

Apparently this is amusing for those that speak rural German as it was mentioned by at least half a dozen people last time:

Edit - someone did try and explain the difference between high and low German but I was drunk and not really listening. I do remember it's counter-intuitive - high German is spoken on the northern flat bit and low German is spoken in the southern mountains?
 
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#19
Manche von uns englander, sprechen schwabisch, babble hessisch,konnen auch platt kuhren, und kennen Das Schwabenlied und das Weserlied auswendig, german is easy to learn, german children from the early age of 2 years speak it
 
#20
german is easy to learn, german children from the early age of 2 years speak it
[insert language] is easy to learn, [insert nationality] learn it. You can make the same argument for any language ever.

I do agree that German should (in theory) be easier to learn with a background in English, the same way that Spanish, French and Italian all share common structures but I am a bit of a biff with languages. I can barely speak English properly ;)
 
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