Wikileaks: Suspect Bradley Manning faces 22 new charges

Well, Aldrich Ames, the Walker Family, and Jonathan Pollard did far worse. And they're all still alive.
And except for Walker are all in solitary high security confinement. Walker being treated for throat cancer is in the medical ward now, High Security solitary before. Put a traitor in the general population and someone will kill them, get that through your heads. There are prisoners who would be heros in the Gen Pop if they shanked Manning to death.
 
Here's an interesting article about PFc Manning:

Army Failed to Follow Warnings About Manning's Mental Health
Most would have recieved the same harden the **** up demotion for assault.

I know a Kid who received 4 UCMJ actions before we even got to Kuwait, was courtmartialed in Taji for breaking into the SIPRnet for his own use. Went to Texas as a Sgt, left Iraq as a Pvt. Computer nerd who thought he didnt have to listen to anyone who outranked him if he didnt consider them as msart as he considered himself.

Beaten by damn near everyman in his HQ Section for his thievery, hacking , beaten at NTC for not listening to his Team Leader(he tried to desert at Ft. Irwin in the Mojave. Some tard had told him the space blankets made you invisible to thermal and IR and his grand plan was to walk to Las Vegas wearing one and carrying 2X 5 gal water cans), Sent to a Line Platoon was caught one night with all his gear off on top of a M113 reading by flashlight in sadr city. Got his ass handed to him again, and banned from missions. Proceeded to deliberately lose his rifle and was court martialed for that. Showed up at BIAP airhead and offered a Sgt going home on emergency leave 5 grand cash to switch uniforms so he could board the C-130

My fondest memory at demobilizing was a Garrison 1SG grabbing him by the collar during a debrief and physically taking him to a detention facility in front of us. Of 139 men he was the only one who had gotten into legal trouble. recieved a Dishonorable Discharge, lost all veterans benefits. He was stripped of his uniform given a bus ticket and literally thrown off the base
 

Command_doh

LE
Book Reviewer
Like the way the condom shirker only acknowledges him when he REALLY has to. Quote was something like 'whether he he is guilty or not'. Yes, like you don't know Jules? You've pocketed the donations and left him to rot right? What have his lawyers said, they've received only a tiny fraction of the donations in his defence so far?
 
Like the way the condom shirker only acknowledges him when he REALLY has to. Quote was something like 'whether he he is guilty or not'. Yes, like you don't know Jules? You've pocketed the donations and left him to rot right? What have his lawyers said, they've received only a tiny fraction of the donations in his defence so far?
According to the conversation between manning and lamo, manning says he has conversed with assange many times. Reading that stuff, the kid sounds like a real tool.


Bradley Manning, in his own words: 'This belongs in the public domain' | World news | The Guardian
 
Manning is likely to spend the rest of his life in Leavenworth-unless the Welsh try to reclaim him later.
 
War crimes good, exposing them bad...

War crimes good, exposing them bad - Opinion - Al Jazeera English

The guy should go to jail for committing an offense? Well, maybe, but there are several officers that need to be locked up for much longer than Manning... they've committed war crimes FFS.

Or did LOAC pass you guys by? Officers are responsible for attrocities committed by soldiers. The law is very ****ing clear about that.
 
The guy should go to jail for committing an offense? Well, maybe, but there are several officers that need to be locked up for much longer than Manning... they've committed war crimes FFS.

Or did LOAC pass you guys by? Officers are responsible for attrocities committed by soldiers. The law is very ****ing clear about that.
But, because LOAC didn't pass me by, I'm not willing to accept CODEPINK's definition of "war crimes", frankly. Yes, dead civilians are an unfortunate "cost of doing the business (of war)". We're supposed to minimise them but the Geneva Conventions and customary international law accept that they will happen. The Iraqi insurgents chose to fight in the cities, where the US were less likely to be able to bring their overwhelming superiority in conventional firepower to bear - just because the US do care about civilian casualties, regardless of their skin colour.

Haditha - which is definitely edging into the potential war crime books (if all the allegations are true - it is one) - 8 marines were charged, although most charges dropped because of investigative bungling (see, it's not just the SIB!) SSgt Wuterich, the patrol commander, goes on trial April this year and, so far, 2 marine Captains have been relieved of duties for failing to press the investigation and one Lt Col has been administratively retired (after command pressure to find a scapegoat resulted in his court martial charges being dropped - parallels with UK cases, perhaps?)
 
so, that will mean Mr Wikileaks will soon be joining Ptve Manning in the same cell block. Once the Swedish Court has decided that their is 'Insufficient Evidence' of Mr Assange 'Being a Naughty Boy with Nice Ladies', representatives of "Rendition Air" will 'assist Mr Assange into a blacked, stretch Humvee, and whisked away to a remote airfield somewhere for the trip to the Land of the Free.
 
Coming to this thread somewhat late, so apologies for any repitition/duplication on my part.

The background to this whole Manning - Wikileaks business is intriguing, particularly if one looks at the personalities of the principals involved.

Even a cursory look at the available profiles of Bradley Manning and Adrian Lamo speak volumes - and that's leaving aside the pantomime fact that Manning's (ex)boyfriend - who introduced him to the hacker community at Brandeis University - is a drag queen. These people are like over-the-top soap characters more suited to a series of Big Brother, with Assange doing a Dr. Evilesque cameo.

For me, the real point of interest is the fact that these internet-dwellers and social misfits managed to ever become party to the sort of information Manning gave to Wikileaks.
 

SecurityGeek

Old-Salt
Coming to this thread somewhat late, so apologies for any repitition/duplication on my part.

The background to this whole Manning - Wikileaks business is intriguing, particularly if one looks at the personalities of the principals involved.

Even a cursory look at the available profiles of Bradley Manning and Adrian Lamo speak volumes - and that's leaving aside the pantomime fact that Manning's (ex)boyfriend - who introduced him to the hacker community at Brandeis University - is a drag queen. These people are like over-the-top soap characters more suited to a series of Big Brother, with Assange doing a Dr. Evilesque cameo.

For me, the real point of interest is the fact that these internet-dwellers and social misfits managed to ever become party to the sort of information Manning gave to Wikileaks.
Here in lies a problem with the current rules. Not getting into an arguement over LGBT in the military or such like, just pointing something out. It covers all forms of potential issue including addiction and financial.

In the 'old days' if you were seen to have what was considered a 'character weakness' this would hopefully be highlighted at your SC/DV interview (failure to disclose indicated even more flaws in your character). Within units people were supposed to be monitored for such weakness (sexual deviation, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, mental instability or financial problems) and reported up the CoC. This occured occasionally, but if able to be covered up it was for reasons of esprite de corp (looking after our own) or simply moving the problem around to avoid the bigger admin paperchain/nightmare.

Fast forward now to a PC based, litigous society where the perception is that to highlight another service persons foibles will leave the reporter open to the PC nazi's branding them whatever 'ism' is considered relevent. How will that affect their career or job prospects. So you now have even more reluctance to highlight potential bad apples or even those who may be a risk not only to others but themselves.

No solution to offer to the problem unless common sense breaks out on all sides (highly unlikely).

And yes I used to deliver a security training lecture where areas for potential blackmail or coercion were detailed. I challenged anyone in the room to beat my 5 out of the 11 taken from the JSP :). Only 1 ever did and he was a Bootie, so no real suprise.
 
Thanks for the insightful reply SG.

I don't have an issue with LGBT in any military....so long as their lifestyle doesn't interfere or trump their being in the military; I would extend this to anyone, whatever 'floats their boat'.

Where we encounter problems is the manner in which various PC 'isms' and the dread spectre of Identity Politics have been brought into consideration. Whether by application of these considerations, oversight, bad luck or stupidity, Manning's selection for his role as an intelligence analyst simply bypassed what should have been the traditional red flags.

What appears to be emerging is that Manning - using the Army as a vehicle or platform for his personal hang-ups and neuroses - was used (willingly or otherwise) as a 'point man' by those he apparently trusted - Lamo, Watkins, and Assange - who in turn all seem to have had considerable chips on their shoulders and a department store's worth of emotional/mental baggage.
 
No comments from CENTCOM so far Jim...

The 'profile' of Manning speaks volumes??? That sounds more than a bit prejudiced, and arguably a fault of US policy for not supporting gay US soldiers.

Well its not for us or CODEPINK to decide what is or isn't a warcrime... thats for a judge in the Hague. Lets hope the alleged perpertrators end up there.

PFC Manning sees evidence for warcrimes and feels compelled to act outside his CoC as he's aware his CoC are covering things up... he's made a difficult but correct decision in my view. As things stand he's the only person that can come out of this with any integrity. The official secrets act or a direct order cannot be used to silence someone from reporting material breaches of LOAC.
 

aberspr

Old-Salt
PFC Manning sees evidence for warcrimes and feels compelled to act outside his CoC as he's aware his CoC are covering things up... he's made a difficult but correct decision in my view. As things stand he's the only person that can come out of this with any integrity. The official secrets act or a direct order cannot be used to silence someone from reporting material breaches of LOAC.
Ok I'll go along with that to a point. As an example the events shown in the Apache gun cam are decidedly dodgy. However he published a whole raft of stuff that wasn't potentially a breach of LOAC. Additionally if he felt the need to go outside the CoC fair enough but publishing publically classified material is not the way to go about it. He should have made his complaint to the military/civil police. If he'd done that and they'd taken no action publishing it publically might be justified but he didn't and it wasn't.

As far as I see it he's a bit of a loser who was desperate to be someone who mattered. A quote from his chat logs says as much "ive been so isolated so long… i just wanted to be nice, and live a normal life… but events kept forcing me to figure out ways to survive… smart enough to know whats going on, but helpless to do anything… no-one took any notice of me". I don't buy his bollocks about war crimes, civil liberties.etc motivating him, I think he just did it because he wanted to indulge his drama queen inclinations and hoped he'd be seen as a hero.
 

Grubby Bum III

War Hero
This lad will unfortunately swing I think, or commit 'suicide'. FYI he's been in solitary for almost a year now, America the greatest Democracy in the world, scary. Behaving like this they are certainly leading a way for some others to follow.
The really worrying thing is that, not only has he been kept in solitary for over a year, but that the Pentagon is able to interfere with his case while it is sub judice and dictate how he should be treated in confinement - see State department spokesman PJ Crowley resigns over Bradley Manning's treatment - Telegraph. Such flagrant disregard for due process bodes ill for anyone who is ever detained in the US and is a very good reason why we should extricate ourselves from the unbalanced agreement with them on extradition.
 
As far as I see it he's a bit of a loser who was desperate to be someone who mattered. A quote from his chat logs says as much "ive been so isolated so long… i just wanted to be nice, and live a normal life… but events kept forcing me to figure out ways to survive… smart enough to know whats going on, but helpless to do anything… no-one took any notice of me". I don't buy his bollocks about war crimes, civil liberties.etc motivating him, I think he just did it because he wanted to indulge his drama queen inclinations and hoped he'd be seen as a hero.
Concur. He's not a hero, he's a very naughty boy.

Manning's homosexuality may have contributed to his sense of isolation but I suspect other aspects of his personality also served to lead him to act as he did. We should not lose sight of the fact that Manning was able to act as he did because of piss poor IT security and lax supervision. I have vague memories of security lectures about 'defence in depth' etc - I would not claim that better IT security and supervision would have totally eliminated Manning's ability to go public, but I think it would certainly have limited the scale of his disclosures.

C_C
 

aberspr

Old-Salt
We should not lose sight of the fact that Manning was able to act as he did because of piss poor IT security and lax supervision. I have vague memories of security lectures about 'defence in depth' etc - I would not claim that better IT security and supervision would have totally eliminated Manning's ability to go public, but I think it would certainly have limited the scale of his disclosures.
Agreed that better IT security and supervision would have reduced his ability to disclose the same volume of material. However you do have to weigh the benefits of increased security against preventing analysts having access to intelligence from the widest range of sources possible. The 9/11 commission report criticised the US intelligence community for not sharing intelligence widely and it seems they've definitely taken it to heart. For example they've got Intellipedia which I believe is basically an internal version of wikipedia that comes in Top Secret, Secret and Unclass flavours.

Personally I think that intelligence should be shared as widely as possible between those who are cleared and placing too many IT security barriers in the system and too much compartmentalisation would be detrimental. Robust supervision is key. With proper supervision I'm sure he would have found removing the data much more difficult and probably would have been made to explain why he'd been accessing such a large amount of data which wasn't linked to his work.
 
Agreed that better IT security and supervision would have reduced his ability to disclose the same volume of material. However you do have to weigh the benefits of increased security against preventing analysts having access to intelligence from the widest range of sources possible. The 9/11 commission report criticised the US intelligence community for not sharing intelligence widely and it seems they've definately taken it to heart. For example they've got Intellipedia which I believe is basically an internal version of wikipedia that comes in Top Secret, Secret and Unclass flavours.

Personally I think that intelligence should be shared as widely as possible between those who are cleared and placing too many IT security barriers in the system and too much compartmentalisation would be detrimental. Robust supervision is key. With proper supervision I'm sure he would have found removing the data much more difficult and probably would have been made to explain why he'd been accessing such a large amount of data which wasn't linked to his work.
For sure. But there a difference between reducing the number of stovepipes and running an analytic shop where the resident toerag can bring in a CD, insert it into a classified system, copy chunks of data to it, and then wander out of the building.

C_C
 

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