WiFi Router

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#1
I have an EE Router which is very much OK, except for one little thing. I believe it is a 5Ghz router, and for 'Smart Home' gadgets they all seem to need a 2.5Ghz router. I don't understand the difference really, but that's what they all seem to need. Can any other make of 2.5Ghz router that I could buy in some high street tech retailer replace my router, or does some other internet jiggery-pokery need to take place?

Have pity on me, I'm not a techy expert.
 
#3
I have an EE Router which is very much OK, except for one little thing. I believe it is a 5Ghz router, and for 'Smart Home' gadgets they all seem to need a 2.5Ghz router. I don't understand the difference really, but that's what they all seem to need. Can any other make of 2.5Ghz router that I could buy in some high street tech retailer replace my router, or does some other internet jiggery-pokery need to take place?

Have pity on me, I'm not a techy expert.
It will almost certainly be a dual band router (if it is either of the last two models supplied by EE it will be).

Both routers should be broadcasting on both both bands simultaneously and I seem to remember that the older model (Brightbox 2) has separate SSIDs for each band but the newer model (Smart Router - supplied since EE and BT merged) has a single SSID set as default covering both bands (SSIDs can be separated within the user settings)

Your 2.4GHz devices should find and connect to the 2.4GHz band without seeing the 5GHz band and without problem if they are in range.

Your 5GHz devices should find the best available signal, whether that be 2.4GHz (generally better range through walls etc) or 5GHz (stronger signal at shorter ranges and less 'neighbourly' congestion on the band.

Brightbox 2
IMG_0921.JPG




Newer Smart Router
IMG_0924.JPG



I can't remember much detail about these routers but I have both models at home. I am in the Lake District on our summer tour right now so can't help with fine tuning the thing and a pint or two of cask bitter is beckoning right now.
 
Last edited:
#5
The two bands perform different functions I believe:

  • 2.4 GHz: Greater range, weaker signal but falls off less with distance. All devices capable of WiFi can connect to this.

  • 5 GHz: Shorter range, stronger signal but falls off faster with distance. Only more modern devices capable of WiFi can connect to this.
 
#6
It is always best to go onto the settings and make the 2.4 and 5 seperate.
 
#8
It will almost certainly be a dual band router (if it is either of the last two models supplied by EE it will be).

Both routers should be broadcasting on both both bands simultaneously and I seem to remember that the older model (Brightbox 2) has separate SSIDs for each band but the newer model (Smart Router - supplied since EE and BT merged) has a single SSID set as default covering both bands (SSIDs can be separated within the user settings)

Your 2.4GHz devices should find and connect to the 2.4GHz band without seeing the 5GHz band and without problem if they are in range.

Your 5GHz devices should find the best available signal, whether that be 2.4GHz (generally better range through walls etc) or 5GHz (stronger signal at shorter ranges and less 'neighbourly' congestion on the band.

Brightbox 2
View attachment 398813



Newer Smart Router
View attachment 398814


I can't remember much detail about these routers but I have both models at home. I am in the Lake District on our summer tour right now so can't help with fine tuning the thing and a pint or two of cask bitter is beckoning right now.

@Graculus
 
#10
It is always best to go onto the settings and make the 2.4 and 5 seperate.
Can you expand on that a bit - e.g. router settings, or device settings? How does one divide them?
 
#11
Can you expand on that a bit - e.g. router settings, or device settings? How does one divide them?
He shouldn't really tell you. Sharing knowledge is something to be mocked according to our headhunted tenured lecturer, scientist and pension adviser @abysmal__loser.

Helping people out if you can is also risible it seems.
 
#13
He shouldn't really tell you. Sharing knowledge is something to be mocked according to our headhunted tenured lecturer, scientist and pension adviser @abysmal__loser.

Helping people out if you can is also risible it seems.


No I said sharing knowledge is exactly how things work; it was you and others who claimed learning can only come from direct experience.


Keep up - and stop trying to drag the thread off topic and into a bitch fest.
 
#14
Can you expand on that a bit - e.g. router settings, or device settings? How does one divide them?
It'll be on the router settings for WiFi and varies from router to router - you want the option where you can give a separate SSID (the name of the WiFi network you see to connect to) for each frequency - that way you can force devices onto the frequency you want rather than letting them choose automatically (and often badly).
 
#15
No I said sharing knowledge is exactly how things work; it was you and others who claimed learning can only come from direct experience.


Keep up - and stop trying to drag the thread off topic and into a bitch fest.
Nope... I never claimed anything of the sort as you know. I didn't enter into that particular off topic discussion.

More obvious lies from our resident pathological liar.

Oh, nice rating change from dum to informative on my reply to Legs above. Did you suddenly feel a bit stupid?
 
#16
It'll be on the router settings for WiFi and varies from router to router - you want the option where you can give a separate SSID (the name of the WiFi network you see to connect to) for each frequency - that way you can force devices onto the frequency you want rather than letting them choose automatically (and often badly).
Thanks for that - useful to know.
 
#17
This is for a different router to yours, but essentially you're looking for something like this. Just look through all the settings until you find something similar.

View attachment 398916
Thanks Drazyl. I can't get into the router I have (in France), but do you think it would be possible to link another router to it by Cat5 and rebro on the second router? (I have a spare non-telcom company router)
 
#18
Nope... I never claimed anything of the sort as you know. I didn't enter into that particular off topic discussion.

More obvious lies from our resident pathological liar.

Oh, nice rating change from dum to informative on my reply to Legs above. Did you suddenly feel a bit stupid?
Only a bit? o_O
 
#19
Thanks Drazyl. I can't get into the router I have (in France), but do you think it would be possible to link another router to it by Cat5 and rebro on the second router? (I have a spare non-telcom company router)
If your existing router has ethernet ports, you should be able to connect another WiFi router as long as it has an ethernet "external" connection - ideally you would want to turn off the WiFi on the existing one to reduce interferance and free up channels.

Edit to add: this probably results in WiFi connections being NAT'd twice, which may cause issues, particularly with running PC/console games.
 
#20
If your existing router has ethernet ports, you should be able to connect another WiFi router as long as it has an ethernet "external" connection - ideally you would want to turn off the WiFi on the existing one to reduce interferance and free up channels.

Edit to add: this probably results in WiFi connections being NAT'd twice, which may cause issues, particularly with running PC/console games.

Also turn off DHCP on the 2nd router too.
 

Top