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Why the EM2 was a failure !

#3
Only ever seen a few pictures and the Pathe news film of how good the EM2 was, never seen a modern clip but here is one now.

Love the box and weapon but seeing the requirements to mill the thing , have a look.
Its complexity was not the reason it wasn't manufactured in quantity.
The Americans insisted on using their 7.62mm cartridge throughout NATO.
Churchill was re-elected and did a U-turn. EM-2 had already been adopted and there was rapid back-pedalling to find a rifle capable of better handling the bigger cartridge.

We wound up with some inferior Belgian rifle, the name of which I forget.

The extensive machining was probably an advantage, providing jobs for lots of skilled workers.
They could have made a similar bull-pup rifle much more cheaply using steel stampings, but that would probably have been ****.
 
#4
Spams wouldn't go for a bullet smaller than .300 cal... EM-2 could be re-bored for 7.62mm.

Shame. Optical sight and auto in the '60s, with the best round of the time, a heady combo of weight v light and distance v punch.
 
#7
It would be interesting to seee how much a EM2 is going for now. Of course, only in the land of Uncle Sam but i reckon not much change from $10k.
 
#10
The EM-2 in its original format had a few problems, but no more than any experimental design, and could have been made to work. The Septic demand for 7.62mm was their usual parochial job and killed the rifle - it would not have worked with the bigger cartridge. The resulting adoption of THAT rifle was, in some ways, the worst of two worlds, but it did the job it was wanted for - and I for one like it. The fashion for 5.56mm was a Cold War demand for something to fill the air with lead (or whatever) out to 200m, the point where Russky Motor Infantry got out of their APCs for the final assault. At 500m, in thin air and a shitty mirage, it's stuffed....
 
D

Davetheclown

Guest
#11
Has anyone made a version of this using modern materials, it looks like a cool weapon even with the kick of a donkey. Love to see a weapons manafacturer like HK take this and make it for the modern market,
 
#12
Has anyone made a version of this using modern materials, it looks like a cool weapon even with the kick of a donkey. Love to see a weapons manafacturer like HK take this and make it for the modern market,
[wah]They did. It's called the A2[/wah] It would be nice to see it in a large case 7mm.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
good video - that thing made one hell of a racket - is that down to him being in (what looked like) an enclosed space?
 
#16
Very interesting to see it field stripped. The fit and finish looks (and sounds) superb. If that had gone into service we would be using a modernised version of it today.
 
M

Mark The Convict

Guest
#17
A fetchingly slender design, rather greyhound-like. Clearly a bit brisk in the shoulder though.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#18
Very interesting to see it field stripped. The fit and finish looks (and sounds) superb. If that had gone into service we would be using a modernised version of it today.
This help?

em2strip.jpg

And with regard to the OP, the reason why the EM-2 did not survive is down to American intransigence over their preferred cartridge and a liberal dosage of NIH Syndrome.
 
#19
The EM2 (and EM1) failed because they were 1500V DC locomotives at a time that every other overhead line was 25kV AC.

Hideously ugly thing, the EMs. Here's one next to Deltic.

View attachment 129747
CRAYON ON/That is an EM1... the EM2s were sold to Dutch Railways./CRAYON OFF.

Nice weapon. What is the direction that small arms ammunition will take now? A larger calibre or staying as current?
 
#20
If that had gone into service we would be using a modernised version of it today.
No, we would be using the L85 or something similar, after having run the EM2s until they were completely shagged out and as slack as a Dubai hooker's flange. I shudder to think what it would cost to make one of those receivers now. There's a reason why a new FN-FAL costs four times as much as an AR15, and it's all to do with manufacturing techniques. Machining large, complex parts out of solid hunks of steel is a complete non-starter.
 

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