Why SPAMS?

#1
Aaaaah. I remember by fun times in Germany. Worked with the Americans loads of times, but never knew why they were called SPAMS. Who can clarify? Tks.
 
#3
Spastic Plastic American Motherf*****s

Sniff test man, the one who performs the 'sniff test' by levering his respirator gently away from his face to test that there are no chemicals left in the air after an attack

Cheers,
msr
 
#7
I am not completely sure about this but I think that the term comes from the fact that SPAM (Spiced Pork And Ham) was an American innovation that came over on the convoys as part of war aid in WWII.
 
#8
Slightly off the thread,  but ....

Only in America!

Scientists at Roll Royce built a gun specifically to launch dead chickens at the windshields of airliners, and military jets, all travelling at maximum velocity.


The idea is to simulate the frequent incidents of collisions with airborne fowl to test the strength of the windshields. American engineers heard about the gun and were eager to test it on the windshields of their new high-speed trains. Arrangements were made, and a gun was sent to the American engineers.

When the gun was fired, the engineers stood shocked as the chicken hurled out of the barrel, crashed into the shatterproof shield, smashed it to smithereens, blasted through the control console, snapped the engineer's back-rest in two and embedded itself in the back wall of the cabin, like an arrow shot from a bow.

The horrified Yanks sent Rolls Royce the disastrous results of the experiment, along with the designs of the windshield and begged the British scientists for suggestions.

Rolls Royce responded with a one-line memo:













"Defrost the chicken." ;D ;D ;D ;D
 
#9
Just to go against the thread,

Having just worked closely with the USMC on a fairly significant op, I can safely say that they were the epitome of professionalism.  Their officers and soldiers were intelligent robust and knew their business.  They were well equipped and performed excellently on the battlefield.  To say that they are useless is bollocks.  And don't start quoting the friendly fire argument at me.  Having come from a battlegroup which lost more to Brit friendly fire than to enemy it wont wash.  There is a lot of ignorance ou there which is unhelpful bearing in mind that we are unlikely to fight without them again.

Granted some of the muppets in their forces are pants but then look at the some of the dross we have.
 
#12
dogmokney said:
Just to go against the thread,

Having just worked closely with the USMC on a fairly significant op, I can safely say that they were the epitome of professionalism. Their officers and soldiers were intelligent robust and knew their business. They were well equipped and performed excellently on the battlefield. To say that they are useless is balls. And don't start quoting the friendly fire argument at me. Having come from a battlegroup which lost more to Brit friendly fire than to enemy it wont wash. There is a lot of ignorance ou there which is unhelpful bearing in mind that we are unlikely to fight without them again.

Granted some of the muppets in their forces are pants but then look at the some of the dross we have.
$20 on its way to you....shhhhhhhh :)
 
#15
Oracle said:
Slightly off the thread, but ....

Only in America!

Scientists at Roll Royce built a gun specifically to launch dead chickens at the windshields of airliners, and military jets, all travelling at maximum velocity.


The idea is to simulate the frequent incidents of collisions with airborne fowl to test the strength of the windshields. American engineers heard about the gun and were eager to test it on the windshields of their new high-speed trains. Arrangements were made, and a gun was sent to the American engineers.

When the gun was fired, the engineers stood shocked as the chicken hurled out of the barrel, crashed into the shatterproof shield, smashed it to smithereens, blasted through the control console, snapped the engineer's back-rest in two and embedded itself in the back wall of the cabin, like an arrow shot from a bow.

The horrified Yanks sent Rolls Royce the disastrous results of the experiment, along with the designs of the windshield and begged the British scientists for suggestions.

Rolls Royce responded with a one-line memo:













"Defrost the chicken." ;D ;D ;D ;D

shut up. Urban myth. Snopes is your friend
 
#16
zx6 said:
Aaaaah. I remember by fun times in Germany. Worked with the Americans loads of times, but never knew why they were called SPAMS. Who can clarify? Tks.

Hormel developed America's first canned ham (''Hormel Flavor-Sealed Ham'') in 1926, and eleven years later developed the first canned meat product that did not require refrigeration. It was a ''distinctive chopped pork shoulder and ham mixture'' developed by Jay C. Hormel, son of Hormel founder George A. Hormel, and marketed as ''Hormel Spiced Ham'' - not a terribly inspiring name for an innovative product fated to save lives, win wars, and balance diets of people world wide.

Hormel Spiced Ham got off to a slightly rocky start. Other meatpackers began to introduce their own canned luncheon meats, and Hormel lost its controlling share of the market. Soon, however, they came up with a cunning plan to rectify this situation - they would give Hormel's luncheon meat a truly catchy name. Toward this end, they offered $100 for a suitable appellation. The winning name was, of course, ''SPAM'', and a legend was born.

SPAM was launched with much high-profile advertising in mid-1937. It was called ''the Miracle Meat'', and promoted as an anytime meat. In 1940, SPAM was the subject of quite possibly the first singing commercial. The jingle was to the tune of the chorus of ''My Bonny Lies Over The Ocean'', and the lyrics were ''SPAM SPAM SPAM SPAM/ Hormel's new miracle meat in a can/ Tastes fine, saves time./ If you want something grand,/ Ask for SPAM!''. Hormel also sponsored George Burns' and Gracie Allen's network radio show, which included ''Spammy the Pig''. During World War II, sales boomed. Not only was SPAM great for the military, as it required no refrigeration, it wasn't rationed as beef was, so it became a prime staple in American meals. SPAM supported the war effort more directly, too. Nikita Kruschev credits SPAM with the survival of the Russian Army during WWII. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, the Hormel Girls performing troupe advertised SPAM as they performed throughout the country, distributed SPAM door-to-door, and even had a national weekly radio show. Ads proclaimed, ''Cold or hot, SPAM hits the spot!''

In 1960, SPAM began to be sold in 7 oz cans alonside the original 12 oz ones. SPAM began to spawn variations in 1971, when smoke-flavored SPAM was introduced. Next came less salt/sodium SPAM, in 1986, and with it the honour of being considered ''state of the art in its industry'' by the Minnesota Association of Commerce and Industry." In the early 1990s, SPAM Breakfast Strips were introduced, as was SPAM lite.

What now awaits us on the SPAM front? Only time (and possibly Hormel) will tell.

Hope that helps. Oh and it's basically the state dish of Hawaii.They eat more of the stuff than most of the country combined.
 
#17
strewth said:
dogmokney said:
Just to go against the thread,

Having just worked closely with the USMC on a fairly significant op, I can safely say that they were the epitome of professionalism. Their officers and soldiers were intelligent robust and knew their business. They were well equipped and performed excellently on the battlefield. To say that they are useless is balls. And don't start quoting the friendly fire argument at me. Having come from a battlegroup which lost more to Brit friendly fire than to enemy it wont wash. There is a lot of ignorance ou there which is unhelpful bearing in mind that we are unlikely to fight without them again.

Granted some of the muppets in their forces are pants but then look at the some of the dross we have.
$20 on its way to you....shhhhhhhh :)
Strewth,
Over 4 years to get the cheque in the post?
Are you a SPAM? :wink:
 
#19
Slightly irrelevant but, I once worked at an establishment holding aircraft spares and was told of an instance wherea crate had arrived from America, but on opening was found to be diffy the requisite Phantom part; there was only the packing dessicant (dried rice - very eco-friendly!). As per instructions a deficiency report was raised and a request for disposal instructions made.

The reply from the USA:

Boil in milk and eat.
 
G

GLESGA-NED

Guest
#20
dogmokney said:
Just to go against the thread,

Having just worked closely with the USMC on a fairly significant op, I can safely say that they were the epitome of professionalism. Their officers and soldiers were intelligent robust and knew their business. They were well equipped and performed excellently on the battlefield. To say that they are useless is balls. And don't start quoting the friendly fire argument at me. Having come from a battlegroup which lost more to Brit friendly fire than to enemy it wont wash. There is a lot of ignorance ou there which is unhelpful bearing in mind that we are unlikely to fight without them again.

Granted some of the muppets in their forces are pants but then look at the some of the dross we have.
Totally agree USMC are excellent blokes to work with. Our military ethos is slightly different resulting in some big misenterpretation of these guys.
 

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