Why Soldiers Complain And My Theory

Discussion in 'Army Pay, Claims & JPA' started by Speedy, Dec 19, 2003.

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  1. I know that many here have made constant refernance to the fact that, in the whole, soldiers like to gripe, whinge, and complain about everything and anything, and for some time this has puzzled me as to exactly why.
    Last night, out of the blue it struck me why (IMHO Anyway).

    It's because we are, on the whole, perfectionists. Every facet of military life, starting from training, is geared to getting it right first time, every time and when things aren't right (often due to events out of our control, such as the weather) we complain about how problems should and could be corrected. Everyone has there opionion on how things should be run, conducted, operated and sorted out. I applied this new thought to arguments and ripes I have had in the past and found that all came down to people having different views on how problems would be solved if 'they' ran things.
    Can anyone else here think of other reasons why soldiers complain so much, excluding the answers 'Because we can' and 'It passes the time'?
     
  2. Bolllocks, with a capital B.
     
  3. Explain please.
     
  4. Speedy, having re-read your comments, I withdraw my bolllocks remark. I agree with you, every single person has their own idea on what/why/how, etc, which is not necessarily the correct way, so when things are not going the way they are supposed to, it's human nature to moan. Moaning is part of mil life, and one which will never change. Even in civie street, moaning about everything, including the coffee machines, is a way of life. I learned from an early age to go with the flow and mellow out, as joining in or starting non-constructive moaning (or, in other words, moaning for the sake of fcuking moan) gets you nowhere and possibly a reputation for being a 'moaning old basstard'. The only way to combat it between yourself and your section/team/mates, is to ensure daily work routine, whether on ex or in barracks is properly co-ordinated so that troops are not sat around bored, although that can't be helped, so again, moaning comes into play. Plus various sections around camp will do much to help 'stoke the firs' of moaning, such as crap messing, poor pay staff, boring training wing. You'll never win.............
     
  5. Could not agree more Speedy, When I "had the sqn" way back when I used to award a case of beer to the biggest moaner of the month, "Niner" made me abolish the sytem when the OC won it :!: :!: :!: Thought I was biased as he believed he had far outmoaned the OC :lol:
     
  6. IF we complain then we might get a better deal, it`s how the the complaint is delivered and taken on board that counts.

    Fact: the Army needs young, fit men who are willing to spend extended time away from home, engage in physical combat and kill when so directed; the vast majority of these must be otther ranks. There are many advantages to a service career but, only after enlistment, do soldiers start to learn something of the disadvantages; training that is unlikely to be recognised by a civilian employer, manning control points, repeated separation from wife & children, uncertainty over entitlements to pay, pension and allowances, and their enforced redundancy at 40. We have no `Bill of Rights` - can anyone say we know where to get accurate, reputable advice ?

    As an infanteer I have seen lots of young soldiers leave the Army without any clue what they were going to do next - where they were going to live, what cash they could expect to receive on discharge and where to go for advice. Many have joined the Army straight from school, or after Job experience schemes, many had broken family backgrounds and had limited job opportunities. Are they well served during their service ? Well, often they do not get the chance even to complete their leave or resettlement training (which is of limited use anyway) because they couldn’t be spared and our system does not encourage them to speak up for their rights. OCs, Platoon Commanders, and ever-zealous CSMs don’t know what their men are entitled to either – or are more interested in playing the numbers game for duties and commitments.

    The Army continues to provide Families Officers to sort out houses, Pay staff to sort out debts, Padres, WRVS, SSAFA etc, etc ....we do our personnel no favours by doing `the thinking for them’ rather than developing and preparing them for the harsh realities of the civilian life that many of them joined the Army to escape. Can it really make sense in any other employment to throw our highly trained staff on the scrapheap at 40 with virtually no option of a full career ?

    We need to copy the American system; they value and develop their soldiers throughout their service and provide an extensive network of civilian employers who identify and recruit from specific service skill sets. Incidentally they also provide excellent support to their veterans in retirement – ex-service Brits can’t even go into a NAAFI or YMCA to buy a newspaper ! This level of support costs money but, if we must play world policeman along with the American’s, then we need to get those many nations hiding behind us, happy to fill their fuel tanks cheaply while we protect the oilfields, to put their hands into their pocket to fund it.

    Over to you Mr H, it`s a vote winner
     
  7. But the Americans are stupid. Yup you can never please everyone all the time. I find hypocricy takes a toll as well. In my troop, they'd whine about not going to places better than the local bar. So I'd organise one, give them a price and get a full amount of numbers, I give them a date. As we get nearer the date, they then don't want to pay and then the numbers reduce and we either do the sports afternoon or end up in the pub. But they wanted to do something different.

    I eventually succeeded in taking them out and some of the complained again about not enough food, the beer was expensive yadeyadeya. So they whined about that. After a few months later, the place was back on the list of places to go meaning the interest was still there dispite the whining. Yup people don't know what they want but they have the same thought process as the signals....wanting your cake and eat it or wanting something big at a very cheap price borderline free.
     
  8. Go Jethro!
     
  9. Has anyone noticed that for quality,sustained and deeply penetrating complaining/whinging you can't beat the World War II veteran.What ever you do for these chaps (and truly we can't do enough in terms of what they gave/suffered during the conflict) It will always be a "disgrace"," an insult","could have been better organised","the beer was too expensive""the music was too loud".In the Whinging League they are truly members of the Premiership.(bless them) :)
     
  10. Why do we moan, its human nature to moan, but I have found the less we are capable of sorting out a problem, i.e. a situation out of your hands,headshed up its arse or knackered kit the louder we moan.I f we can sort out a problem, we do, then moan about it
     
  11. My observation of ex-servicemen (all three services) is that far too often they whinge about things amongst themselves but rarely put it to the supervisor or management.
    I'm prepared to be shot down because of course it's a generalisation and civvies can be equally guilty. But I've often found something wrong/not working and on mentioning it to the people concerned am told. "Yeah, it's been like that for ages" Invariably the people concerned were ex-service and had done SFA about it in terms of alerting the heirarchy.
    It takes quite a lot of counselling to get some of them out of that mindset.
     
  12. I've always said that a complaining soldier is a thinking soldier. It's when they stop complaining that I get worried.

    IF