Why must factory swords be straight?

#44
While the nnjato is a myth (it's a blunt fishmongers tuna knife, used in films for the reasons you state and because it was cheaper), I have seen in the Leeds Royal Armouries a period "straight" Samurai sword blade with provenance and a contemporary woodcut showing one been worn. They were a fashion at the time English, Dutch and Portuguese traders were in japan and very loosely styled after the European rapier blade.The woodcut also shows young samurai with their hakama bloused in imitation of the baggy trousers that European traders and sailors were wearing.
In the same Museum in Leeds there is a naginata styled as a halberd.

The blade while straight did not have a straight cutting edge but had a slight belly before the kissaki (stabby bit) though you could have used the mune (back of blade) as a ruler, so it should still be able to cut on the draw.
Yes, the Japanese had straight swords as well as curved ones in historic times, although the curved ones predominated in the classic "samurai" era. There were also historic swords with square guards.

What I was referring to was the movie convention that "ninjas" had a special sword characterized by a straight blade and a square guard and that such a sword identified someone as a ninja. The sword in the ad referenced in the preceding post called it a "ninja sword".
Silver Ninja Sword with Sheath. A well balanced, UK legal, Ninja sword with sheath and shoulder strap at very reasonable price. Best price ninja sword
From what we know about "ninjas" today, they were just what we would call spies. Unsurprisingly they would be dressed and equipped in an unremarkable fashion to blend in. Western countries at the time also used spies. The idea of the "ninja" as the comic book style costumed character was a later creation of the theatrical and movie industries who needed clearly defined stylized heroes and villains.

Now if someone likes collecting reproductions of movie props as a hobby, I have no issues with that. We just need to be clear that these are movie props not representations of history.
 
Last edited:
#45
I don't know what you would call this thing but you used to see similar stuff in quite a few shop windows in Uxbridge near where I live.


I watched a young guy buying something like this once in a shop and I did think to myself, yeah, he's buying that to hang on his wall as a decoration somewhere.
 
#46
You don’t do the garden with a sword though.

I know what you’re saying, but machetes do have a use.
There's two issues. One is what you are allowed to possess at all, and the other is what you are allowed to carry around in public.

So far as I am aware, you can own a machete in the UK if you are using it in your garden, farm, or other legitimate purpose. You can have it in public if you are transporting it between your home or business and a place of work. However, you aren't allowed to carry it into a pub under your coat on a Saturday night for the purpose of settling disputes.
 
#48
I don't know what you would call this thing but you used to see similar stuff in quite a few shop windows in Uxbridge near where I live.


I watched a young guy buying something like this once in a shop and I did think to myself, yeah, he's buying that to hang on his wall as a decoration somewhere.
I believe that "zombie knives" were banned in the UK a couple of years ago.
Zombie knives banned in England and Wales
'Zombie knives' ban to come into force

Note that there is no specific shape or style to define what is a "zombie knife", so there is a lot of room for interpretation.
There is no specific shape or style, but they are very ornate and intended to shock.
In varying lengths and often with a serrated edge, the knives carry logos or words that glamorise and promote violence.
 
#49
I don't know what you would call this thing but you used to see similar stuff in quite a few shop windows in Uxbridge near where I live.


I watched a young guy buying something like this once in a shop and I did think to myself, yeah, he's buying that to hang on his wall as a decoration somewhere.
They're bought by sci-fi and fantasy geeks, so he probably was. No real chav would shell out for that. I mean those saw-backed bits could rip your Nike puffa jacket when you were trying to hide it from the Babylon init.
 
#50
It was just something I found on the net and I was curious as to the reason.
well it's just that something's niggling away in the back of my mind and swordy things and the issuance thereof was the province of the Armouries which meant they were limited to the military. I don't think Wilkinson was like the only manufacturer in them times but it wound up like that. As yer average Herbert didn't have access to them. Wasn't the sabre last updated for military in the 19th century and in the States at that.
 
#51
well it's just that something's niggling away in the back of my mind and swordy things and the issuance thereof was the province of the Armouries which meant they were limited to the military. I don't think Wilkinson was like the only manufacturer in them times but it wound up like that. As yer average Herbert didn't have access to them. Wasn't the sabre last updated for military in the 19th century and in the States at that.
Nonsense. Officers sidearms were privately procured at least up until the Second World War.
 
#53
Yes I am carrying a svord mini peasant to be compliant, I am just waiting for some bell end to claim it's an open razor.
Are they ok for carrying in your pocket, do they not open and radically tailor your strides
 
#54
On several separate occasions in the last 2 weeks I have been served in different pubs in different towns/villages whilst having a 6" blade stuffed in my sock, a 16" Dirk on my belt and on one occasion, a basket hilt sword on my left hip.

They even let me and several other suitably attired civvies march up and down the main street, stopping traffic and so on with said "weapons" openly on display, with Police officers escorting us.

I do like Scotland sometimes ;)
 
#55
They are MOST DEFINITELY NOT intended for actually hitting anything with.[/QUOTE said:
Fixed that - Hitting things with these cheapo swords is more likely to injure the "hitter" than the "hitee"

There are plenty of You tube videos testament to that fact.
 
#56
well it's just that something's niggling away in the back of my mind and swordy things and the issuance thereof was the province of the Armouries which meant they were limited to the military. I don't think Wilkinson was like the only manufacturer in them times but it wound up like that. As yer average Herbert didn't have access to them. Wasn't the sabre last updated for military in the 19th century and in the States at that.
Coming out from the Medieval era Gentlemen had swords... Civilian swords fashioned themselves on the Rapier in the 15/16th centuries this then became the Small Sword the Court Sword and the Epee Losing length and weight but keeping the general form of a cup or swept guard and a straight thrusting blade.

Military Swords in Europe stabilised on Basket Hilted Broadswords such as the Mortuary Sword, what is often mistakenly called a "Claymore" and the Venetian Schiavonna. These were used by both infantry and cavalry.

In the 18th Century the curved light cavalry sabre was picked up from eastern Europe. It was last redesigned and issued as a straight thrusting weapon by the War Office in 1908.

 
#57
Zombie knives were banned in an amendment to the CJ Act ‘88:
The Criminal Justice Act 1988 (Offensive Weapons) (Amendment) Order 2016
2.—(1) The Schedule to the Criminal Justice Act 1988 (Offensive Weapons) Order 1988 (1) (which specifies offensive weapons for the purposes of section 141 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 ) is amended as follows.
(2) In paragraph 1, after sub-paragraph (r) insert—
“(s)the weapon sometimes known as a “zombie knife”, “zombie killer knife” or “zombie slayer knife”, being a blade with—
(i)a cutting edge;
(ii)a serrated edge; and
(iii)images or words (whether on the blade or handle) that suggest that it is to be used for the purpose of violence.”.
The original CJ Act ‘88 with amendments:
Criminal Justice Act 1988
Power of the SOS:
Criminal Justice Act 1988
Having an article with a blade or point in a public place:
Criminal Justice Act 1988
 
#58
Are they ok for carrying in your pocket, do they not open and radically tailor your strides
You can adjust the friction holding the blade by tightening or slackening the screws, that and carry tip down and I have been fine so far.

Oh and the little hole in the tang was a bit rough so I cleaned it up with a rat tail file.
 
#59
You can adjust the friction holding the blade by tightening or slackening the screws, that and carry tip down and I have been fine so far.

Oh and the little hole in the tang was a bit rough so I cleaned it up with a rat tail file.
do they sharpen up well?

I'd never sharpened up a knife succesfully till I bought a set of global knives and I got a a minosharp

IDIOT PROOF NINJA SHARPENER

I just used to chuck a knife in the drawer and buy another one, now eveything is honed up when required. never really need to buy a knife again all my old gerbers and other folders, random knives are now razor sharp.

works on cheap kitchen knives as well just doesn't hold the sharp for as long
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#60
On several separate occasions in the last 2 weeks I have been served in different pubs in different towns/villages whilst having a 6" blade stuffed in my sock, a 16" Dirk on my belt and on one occasion, a basket hilt sword on my left hip.

They even let me and several other suitably attired civvies march up and down the main street, stopping traffic and so on with said "weapons" openly on display, with Police officers escorting us.

I do like Scotland sometimes ;)
They were ordering people to hand over their Sgian Dhus before going into the Edinburgh Tattoo (at least they were last Saturday when I went). They were ticketed and a receipt was issued for later collection. They allowed me to keep my sgian brew (bottle opener with sgian dhu handle). I usually carry it when going into venues that might get upset.
 

Top