Why must factory swords be straight?

#22
The authorities will never learn, its not the sword etc thats the problem , if the little chav gangster shites were dealt with appropriately then knife/sword/gun law would not have to change.
Indeed.
The teddy boys used bike chains and straight razors.
This despite there being a lot of WW@ surplus bayonets and revolvers knocking and available.
But the teds knew that was serious jail time/the rope if they got caught.
Laws on 'offensive weapons' - chains and razors - were applied vigorously.
There are plenty of laws re knives and swords, yet they aren't implemented harshly these days.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
#23
what about masons carrying swords eg knights Templar in bags around streets ?
I used to dismantle mine just in case .
 
#25
what about masons carrying swords eg knights Templar in bags around streets ?
I used to dismantle mine just in case .
From the previously mentioned official guidance on knives and swords:

Examples of good reasons to carry a knife or weapon in public can include:
  • taking knives you use at work to and from work
  • taking it to a gallery or museum to be exhibited
  • if it’ll be used for theatre, film, television, historical reenactment or religious purposes, for example the kirpan some Sikhs carry
  • if it’ll be used in a demonstration or to teach someone how to use it

You might want to ask someone if Masonic swords would fall under one of those provided you were taking it to or from a suitable event rather than taking it to the pub to smite someone with.
 
#26
And by rather fortuitous coincidence, a video was published today by a well known expert on British military sabres which covers some of the development of the 1796 LC sabre. He also happens to be an antique sword dealer and runs one of the UK's top historical fencing clubs.

 
#28
What's a bit messed up is apparently you can't carry around a fold able leatherman knife/tool if it's over x cm long unless you can justify it or something like that.
 
#31
At that price it may fall apart if you swing it around. The attachment of the blade to the hilt in particular may be very weak. Many of the lower price ones are made for hanging on the wall as decoration and are weakly made of poor quality metal.

There is by the way zero evidence for the existence of special straight "ninja" swords in historic times. They are an invention of the modern movie industry (along with black "ninja" costumes) so the audience can more easily tell the "baddies" from the "goodies". However, they appeal to certain people who want one because it was in a movie they liked, much like other movie "collectibles". They are not necessarily intended for actually hitting anything with.
While the nnjato is a myth (it's a blunt fishmongers tuna knife, used in films for the reasons you state and because it was cheaper), I have seen in the Leeds Royal Armouries a period "straight" Samurai sword blade with provenance and a contemporary woodcut showing one been worn. They were a fashion at the time English, Dutch and Portuguese traders were in japan and very loosely styled after the European rapier blade.The woodcut also shows young samurai with their hakama bloused in imitation of the baggy trousers that European traders and sailors were wearing.
In the same Museum in Leeds there is a naginata styled as a halberd.

The blade while straight did not have a straight cutting edge but had a slight belly before the kissaki (stabby bit) though you could have used the mune (back of blade) as a ruler, so it should still be able to cut on the draw.
 
#32
You don’t do the garden with a sword though.

I know what you’re saying, but machetes do have a use.
Makes me wonder what your garden is like.

On the other hand, think of all those sportswear clad youths suddenly developing a sudden interest in Titchmarsh, and claiming to be holders of a VMH. :)
 
#33
3”/76.2mm. What’s more irksome is that the exemption doesn’t count if it has a lock.
Yes I am carrying a svord mini peasant to be compliant, I am just waiting for some bell end to claim it's an open razor.
 
#35
From the previously mentioned official guidance on knives and swords:

Examples of good reasons to carry a knife or weapon in public can include:
  • taking knives you use at work to and from work
  • taking it to a gallery or museum to be exhibited
  • if it’ll be used for theatre, film, television, historical reenactment or religious purposes, for example the kirpan some Sikhs carry
  • if it’ll be used in a demonstration or to teach someone how to use it

You might want to ask someone if Masonic swords would fall under one of those provided you were taking it to or from a suitable event rather than taking it to the pub to smite someone with.
Masonic swords tend to be straight edged so thats the daft sword law delt with. It would be fine to transport in public, being used for ceremonial purposes it would come under historical/religious. Besides, can you see plod lifting someone from the local lodge for going about their lawful business?
 
#36
What's a bit messed up is apparently you can't carry around a fold able leatherman knife/tool if it's over x cm long unless you can justify it or something like that.

If a large chunk of biltong were to be found on one along with a foldable blade, would that suffice?

(Although the blade would also need to be lockable in order to retain one's digits.)
 
#38
Just found this on the net. Can anyone explain the reasoning behind it?

"Swords that are have curved blades are UK legal if they are hand forged, if they are factory made swords the blades must be straight by law, all our swords comply with this. "
I take it that you are looking from an antique curio perspective?
 

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