Why is Vinyl making a comeback

I made an adapter cable so my 432 driver could listen to Abba instead of the relentless whine of the engine pack,,, Oooh dear.....should have warned him earlier but i thought it would be a nice surrprise .... espcially for the merc overtaking us at that moment on the autobahn
 
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Compromises are made with some digital media (eg mp3) in order to keep the file sizes small and manageable and the sound quality here will be consistent and acceptable rather than the best possible. At its uncompressed best, I doubt if digital can be bettered or even equalled by anything that vinyl has to offer.
See if you can hear a difference between a low bit rare MP3, a high bit rate MP3 and an uncompressed WAV audio file.

Obviously try to listen on the best kit you can, and concentrate on things like sibilance, how a note ends etc.

Note, without hearing any of them you should get 2 out of 6 by just pure guessing.

 
Vinyl made a comeback for numerous reasons.

1. The argument that CDs only reproduce the human hearing range, 20-20,000Hz anything else is ditched. Logical as if you can't hear the sound why recreate it on the CD? Purists would argue the sounds you can't hear affect those you can. Music should have been recorded in an analogue manner and reproduced the same.
2. CDs sample sound at specific points on an analogue wave form. Purists will say that this isn't enough and is turning a downhill slope of sound into something like a flight of stairs.
3. Vinyl sounds "warmer." CD etc sounds too good, too pure, too clean. In a similar way people like cinema showing film at 24 frames a second and not more often even though it should be smoother. (Known as the soap opera effect).
4. If you go to the trouble of putting on a record you might actually take the trouble to listen to it. I mean "really" listen to it.
5. A money - satisfaction loop. A cheap CD player does the same job as a good one. A decent CD player tends to have a better DAC, better construction, smoother operation, but essentially a cheap CD player and a good one can both read the "zero's and one's" from a disk just fine. With vinyl the more you spend on a turntable the better sound you get. People like this cost - reward situation. Note, chances are the original source was recorded digitally and is then sent to both vinyl and CDs, a CD might actually give the best rendition.
6. Some other things, vinyl could only go so "loud." Cut too deep into a record and you could cut through it, CDs didn't have that issue meaning they could be mixed louder. See "the loudness war."
7. Vinyl also set how a record should be arranged. What tracks are best where etc. Techmoan explains why this record was mixed to play from the inside groove to the outside one.

 
See if you can hear a difference between a low bit rare MP3, a high bit rate MP3 and an uncompressed WAV audio file.

Obviously try to listen on the best kit you can, and concentrate on things like sibilance, how a note ends etc.

Note, without hearing any of them you should get 2 out of 6 by just pure guessing.

Without the benchmark...
 

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Dug turntable and boxes of records out a couple of years ago and......put them away again.

Real world utility of a high quality (ie CD quality) streaming sevice simply trumped nostalgia, theoretical advantages by a huge margin.
 
All the recording studios have gone digital years ago,...so, we can have studio standard recordings if you don't mind the file size.
 
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I had a £1,000 transcription deck (Technic SL1100.. which I converted to an SL 110, Inc top of the range SME 3009 (with the little hanging calibration pendulums) with Shure V15/3 bi-elip, plus extras.... and it had a little "unique to task" plug-in lamp that would pulse at 50 Hz a second so I could calibrate my deck speed just right by the stationary dots. And I even had a calibration record to test that all my settings worked right!!

Just the 50 Hz lamp was just the mains frequency supplied by the local station and it could fluctuate depending on demand.... so somebody putting a kettle on 1 mile away was buggering it all up.

Getting Vinyl right can be so soul destroying.
 
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I had a £1,000 transcription deck (Technic SL1100.. which I converted to an SL 110, Inc top of the range SME 3009 (with the little hanging calibration pendulums) with Shure V15/3 bi-elip, plus extras.... and it had a little "unique to task" plug-in lamp that would pulse at 50 Hz a second so I could calibrate my deck speed just right by the stationary dots. And I even had a calibration record to test that all my settings worked right!!

Just the 50 Hz lamp was just the mains frequency supplied by the local station and it could fluctuate depending on demand.... so somebody putting a kettle on 1 mile away was buggering it all up.

Getting Vinyl right can be so soul destroying.

qla-51.png


Pfft.
 
Still 50 Hz mains driven though.... which was my point.
Can't find specs for mine, but the (more expensive) QL-A5 is run off a 5.5MHz oscillator through a divider rather than mains frequency. I guess I could work it out by counting the "ridges" on the platter.
 
Can't find specs for mine, but the (more expensive) QL-A5 is run off a 5.5MHz oscillator through a divider rather than mains frequency. I guess I could work it out by counting the "ridges" on the platter.
No.... this vinyl madness with me stopped 14 years ago.... my therapist said it would never come back... "It is a redundant medium"..... and I believed her!!
make sure you count the 50 Hz ones.... not the US 60 Hz ones.
 

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