Why is the US Flag displayed backwards on their uniform?

#1
An extremely random question, but something that has bugged me for quite a while. Why is the US Flag back to front on the Army uniform?
 
#4
stevo_333 said:
An extremely random question, but something that has bugged me for quite a while. Why is the US Flag back to front on the Army uniform?
It isnt....
 
#6
It's only on the one sleeve, so that the stars are always going forwards. It's something they get very patriotic about and get in a bit of a flap when it's not facing the right way.
 
#7
I was told to imagine the flag as being actual cloth rather than a badge. So, as a solider will always be going forwards the stars on both sides will be to the front. After all, the Americans never retreat...


...They merely withdraw.
 
#10
Why is there gold braid around it?
 

Command_doh

LE
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#12
fraudstar said:
I was told to imagine the flag as being actual cloth rather than a badge. So, as a solider will always be going forwards the stars on both sides will be to the front. After all, the Americans never retreat...


...They merely withdraw.
Was that what they did in Mogadishu then? Followed up by the complete removal of all U.S. forces in the horn of Africa?
 
#13
The serious, boring answer is that if the bloke was walking around holding an Old-Glory flag on a pole, the bit with the stars would be closest to the front, with the stripes-only part behind. The merkins are pedantic to ensure that this is represented on the uniform patches.
They have a whole bunch of other rules about their flag, and these are enshrined in law at a federal level. Can't fly it at night, in the rain, to the west or south of a foreign flag etc etc.
It probably comes from the US being a republic and having to make up the symbols and traditions of a nation overnight in 1775.
 
#14
WTF??? Houston we have a problem...
 
#15
you are a fcuk wit of the highest order. Did you see the preview button?

Right then, thanks to you, bushy top tree and back - GO!
 
#16
As for the gold braid answer, 'because it is' is not a good enough answer. It must be there for a reason. Anyone else? Here's a clue. Something about it being a military flag ???
 
#17
smiffy_the_ferret said:
The serious, boring answer is that if the bloke was walking around holding an Old-Glory flag on a pole, the bit with the stars would be closest to the front, with the stripes-only part behind. The merkins are pedantic to ensure that this is represented on the uniform patches.
They have a whole bunch of other rules about their flag, and these are enshrined in law at a federal level. Can't fly it at night, in the rain, to the west or south of a foreign flag etc etc.
It probably comes from the US being a republic and having to make up the symbols and traditions of a nation overnight in 1775.
Actually most of our "traditions and symbols" came from you seeing that in 1775 we were still part of the British Empire.

By the way, here is an American Army Drill Sergeant trying to teach some British recruits an American tradition:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpwAZQC1Hn0&feature=related
 
#18
gator said:
smiffy_the_ferret said:
The serious, boring answer is that if the bloke was walking around holding an Old-Glory flag on a pole, the bit with the stars would be closest to the front, with the stripes-only part behind. The merkins are pedantic to ensure that this is represented on the uniform patches.
They have a whole bunch of other rules about their flag, and these are enshrined in law at a federal level. Can't fly it at night, in the rain, to the west or south of a foreign flag etc etc.
It probably comes from the US being a republic and having to make up the symbols and traditions of a nation overnight in 1775.
Actually most of our "traditions and symbols" came from you seeing that in 1775 we were still part of the British Empire.

By the way, here is an American Army Drill Sergeant trying to teach some British recruits an American tradition
:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpwAZQC1Hn0&feature=related
Americans don't have traditions....just bad habits.
 
#19
From what I understand, flags are displayed on vehicles (and uniforms) so that the flag always appears to be blown backwards ref. to the direction of travel?
 
#20
My guess? Someone in supply ordered a half million flags to go on the left shoulder with the unit insignia. Unfortunately, he ballsed up and accidently ordered a reversed flag.

They then decided that instead of ordering another half-million flags, they'll just wear it on the right side and go with the 'flying in the breeze' description. I note that in WWII, the US Army seemed to have no particular problem in displaying the flag the 'normal' way around on the right shoulder.

However, there probably is something to it. If you look at US airliners, the starboard side flag is usually reversed. (Base of tail, in this case)

 

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