Why does stuff take so long in the UK?

#1
..this video got me thinking - I am stupid, just assume it - but still. I have been in the UK for a good few years now and even minor things to reconstruct and everything else seems to take ages. Yes, H&S and everything is important and I totally get it, but is it the lack of tradies? Enough vocationally trained people? I've personally seen a bloody roundabout worked on for about a year with no (outwardly) visible changes near where I lived. I've also seen my work parking lot worked on for about 6 months. Something even my fellow countrymen back home would manage to do it much quicker. I really do wonder, is it additional legislation, regulations? Have no clue. Just a thought.

 
#4
I saw a roundabout, converted from an intersection, completed in about 2 weeks not too far from me, and they appeared to take a week off in the middle of construction.

It is unlikely to degrade as rapidly as any Chinese construction project.
 
#8
Don't underestimate them, they have come a long way.
Loads of empty, mega multi-unit housing turning to dust in a handful of years... occupied, multi-level luxury buildings with empty (leaking) pools and non-working elevators after a couple of years... and 2018 outside "Build the World" construction spending down $100Bn to about $180Bn from 2017's $280Bn after starting the great "$900Bn" Belts and Roads projects.
 
#9
I am going to agree with our spammy chum.

Here in Lincolnshire there are road closures that go on for weeks on end, with absolutely no discernible difference at the end of it all.

A stretch of road in South Hykeham, just down the road from me, was closed for 3 months. It caused traffic chaos, added 20 minutes to a journey (which after a week was allowed for) and when it opened up again, Huzzah! we were greeted by a 200 yard stretch of cycle lane. That isn't even used by cyclists. (Another massive fucking pet hate of mine, but not for this thread.) That closure time was insane, and obviously diverted council spending away from other much needed services. (Mental health services for ex servicemen is non existent here, for example.)

A very busy 'T' junction was closed for 'widening.' It took 4 months and it doesn't look any wider than it was before people had to take a 5 mile detour.

I am sure we have have the skills, we have the manpower and equipment so I have no idea why it takes so long 'to get stuff done.'
 
#11
We had a roundabout out of action for about 4 months recently. There were improvements (a paint job would have been as successful), but there are better pavements for pedalestrians. It closed again about 6 weeks later for another 3 months, to do the actual job of retarring the sliproad...

This, however, does not compare with a bridge in Johannesburg. It joined a satellite town (Randburg) to the outskirts of Jo'burg. It took 6 years of detours around the bridge, as there was a dispute on ownership of the bridge itself. Neither town owned it, so it went to court a couple of times. It was eventually finished the same width of the original bridge, but the traffic flow had increased about 15% in the time.
 
#12
Other countries probably don't have the powerful influence on building projects such as Great Crested Newts, Pipistrelle Bats, Badgers, Otters, Lesser Spotted Dung Beetles, etc have in this country. A single Great Crested Newt can hold up the construction of a major motorway/railway station for over a year.

And if you want to lose control of your house, FFS don't tell Natural England/Nature Conservancy Council that you've got a bat in your loft.
 

Sixty

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#13
It's like asking 'why do we not build things like the Flavian Amphitheatre any more?' and then thinking 'oh yeah, the tens of thousands of slaves'.

Worst case scenario when you really don't want to work on that road in Europe? Sacked.
Worst case scenario when you really don't want to work on that road in China? Shot.

Human Rights aren't just the opposite of Human Lefts you know.
 
#15
It's like asking 'why do we not build things like the Flavian Amphitheatre any more?' and then thinking 'oh yeah, the tens of thousands of slaves'.

Worst case scenario when you really don't want to work on that road in Europe? Sacked.
Worst case scenario when you really don't want to work on that road in China? Shot.

Human rights aren't just the opposite of Human lefts you know.
I am not comparing it to China, if I am being honest, more like the U.S. A place I can compare how long stuff takes to be built up. That said, the UK does have a few more protections and laws in place, which I can understand. But it's just sometimes seems absurd.
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#16
I am not comparing it to China, if I am being honest, more like the U.S. A place I can compare how long stuff takes to be built up. That said, the UK does have a few more protections and laws in place, which I can understand. But it's just sometimes seems absurd.
Ah, but comparing colonial simpletons, grateful for one week worth of vacation a decade with those who realise that slacking is an art form is like comparing crabs with bicycles.
 
#20
Ah, but comparing colonial simpletons, grateful for one week worth of vacation a decade with those who realise that slacking is an art form is like comparing crabs with bicycles.
Which a lot of people don't even take for the fear of losing their jobs. I had 10 days of paid vaca for a good few years +public hols, so that came to about 20? roughly, give or take.

When I switched from my U.S. contract to a UK contract for the company I was working for (and when the £ was a lot stronger), I got 25 paid + public. I actually lost a good few the first couple of years of working in the UK as I wasn't used to so many hols.
 

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