Why do we use webbing?

Habitually used L4 magazines on both my issued and privately held models of that gun - still do with the straight pull version of the FN.

Never had any feed issues at all, ever, but then I was and indeed still am fanatical about weapon and ancillaries cleaning

Did find that loading a couple of tracer rounds in first of all to be a very helpful reminder to do a 'mag change when my full attention was directed towards other matters.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Heh. Velcro on pouches. The whole "somehow nobody noticed you firing 30 rounds of 5.56mm, but OMG that rrrrrriiippp of velcro is gonna give the game away" thing.
There is a valid but highly situational objection for recce patrols / units if you want to fire tracer at H hr to mark a target (which requires switching magazines silently). But, yes, that's easy enough to solve other ways.

It's the massive proliferation of velcro on every garment that annoyed me. Mag pouches, no problem. But shirt pockets, trouser pockets...******* MAP POCKETS? Because no soldier ever has been required to navigate silently at night...
 
Or Skinz as the modern version is known. Great for reducing all kinds of skin burn / rub / blisters, very significantly improving survivability and field admin in cold weather, and in reverse, shorter versions great for reducing infections and bites in jungle. As worn, in appropriate conditions, by most specialist environment / ML types / special people I've known. Weigh a hundred grams and generally prevent all sorts of minor field conditions which either require heavier, bulkier med resources to solve, or can quickly become a DNBI.

BUT OH NOES IZ WAT WIMMINZ WEAR!

Guess that's the difference between being professional and looking professional. Know which one I'd rather have in a patrol.
My my you got out of bed on the wrong side this morning. I didn't wear them because I didn't need to. They weren't compulsory.

And all they were, were tights which would have laddered and not worked. I know this because the guys that did buy them said they were useless.

Hope that satisfies you but if it doesn't it doesn't.
 
Any idea why we didnt go for a chamfered rim on the .303 a-la Russian 7.62x54 ?
Ooi, is the bolt head of the Moisin Nagant shaped to accomodate the chamfer or is it a flat face ?
 
There is a valid but highly situational objection for recce patrols / units if you want to fire tracer at H hr to mark a target (which requires switching magazines silently). But, yes, that's easy enough to solve other ways.

It's the massive proliferation of velcro on every garment that annoyed me. Mag pouches, no problem. But shirt pockets, trouser pockets...******* MAP POCKETS? Because no soldier ever has been required to navigate silently at night...
Surely you can dick a patrol member to load with tracer before setting off and get him do it ?
If he has to use it in anger beforehand, then the patrols pretty much blown. Just my 2p.

Velcro, I was told, is cheaper than cutting a button slit in the material, re-inforcing its sides with stitching and then stitching a button on in terms of time and materials. The bean counters win as per usual.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Surely you can dick a patrol member to load with tracer before setting off and get him do it ?
If he has to use it in anger beforehand, then the patrols pretty much blown. Just my 2p.
It's not so much about the patrol being blown: yes, it would be, but that doesn't necessarily mean the whole mission is compromised. It may not be the only patrol; it may be able to get back on route; etc. It's more that your contact drills if you are blown don't want anyone (at all) to have tracer loaded, as it clarifies your position and direction of movement. Was just pointing out that there are some legitimate examples where you might want to swap ammunition silently. But it's easily solvable: tracer magazine in top of daysack etc. Not a huge deal.

The velcro on clothing is a much bigger deal, because it is everywhere and makes noise both intentionally and accidentally: those arm shoulder pockets are a pain in the hoop if you are moving through close trees, as they catch and rip open. There is a reason that those with a choice almost universally preferred the old lightweight shirts for field wear, and it wasn't just looking ally.

But you raise a good point - I would be totally unsurprised if cost was the reasoning. What used to piss me off is then seeing all the (largely office-bound) staff ranks jump in and start justifying the new design in tactical terms. There were genuine arguments in some places (and top level direction from Andover) that things had to be worn because they were issued - see the arguments over para smocks for example - with all sorts of bullshit justification about how velcro was fine when if you read any infantry field manual it is clearly not. I remember one example from the Afghan COIN field manual circa 2012, which insisted that uniform must be worn uniformly because "it is important that LNs see us as professional Army, which will help win consent". Utter bollocks that has never been in any COIN principle ever, and many have suggested precisely the opposite, that "going local" is a much more effective way of consent winning (professional armies not being the most popular groups in COIN environments, thus why they are COIN environments in the first place). Could have simply been omitted. But, no, instead some Major rewrote tactical doctrine to fit intra-Service politicking.

It's the mentality that abandons any independent thought or tactical common sense, and just starts justifying and enforcing The Answer for no reason other than it is The Answer that is dangerous. You've either got issued shirts or mag pouches with velcro on them or you don't. That's not a huge problem in the end, easy enough to fix yourself. Forcing your troops to make bad decisions for completely the wrong reasons is a huge problem.
 
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Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
My my you got out of bed on the wrong side this morning. I didn't wear them because I didn't need to. They weren't compulsory.

And all they were, were tights which would have laddered and not worked. I know this because the guys that did buy them said they were useless.

Hope that satisfies you but if it doesn't it doesn't.
I really give no hoots about how or what you wore.

But these kinds of threads tend to get read by the silent crow contingent who still (just about) come on here for info, and even though you weren't giving advice, it annoys me when what could easily be construed as advice is bad. There is a perfectly good reason for those things, and not doing things because they don't "look" right is unfortunately all too common among recruits. So I argued the point.

Simples.
 
Any idea why we didnt go for a chamfered rim on the .303 a-la Russian 7.62x54 ?
Ooi, is the bolt head of the Moisin Nagant shaped to accomodate the chamfer or is it a flat face ?
We did. Well, actually it's a radius but I keep referring to it as a "chamfer" cos I'm an idiot. Which is why British mil-spec .303 doesn't rim jam.

The chamfer of the 7.62x54R does nothing at all in respect of rim jam, it's far too shallow.

I shall post this vid yet again ;)

 
I think the radius is somewhat exaggerated in this drawing

1539867504005.png
 
Someone's just sent me a photo of some very old British ammo, and the radius does indeed look exactly like that diagram. The RG 43 I've got has far less, but won't jam (when fresh).
 
Rimlock. The Nagant design held the cartridges and released them one at a time to overcome the issue of the external rim.
Except this typically doesn't work for the first round (it should but the interruptor is normally out of whack on most rifles), and once the remaining stack pops up they self-order (in fact, the fix if you can't feed the first round is to open the floorplate a bit until the rounds "pop" into order and slam it shut).
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Not exactly. Besides having to remove the charger once you loaded the rounds it had to be oriented the correct way or you would get rim lock. It probably was the worst bolt gun to use in a high stress situation. Mauser and similar was so much easier. Even the Russians/Soviets had a better system for the internal magazine so you would avoid the issues that plagued the Enfield.
You'd better avoid the next few CDTs.

Think you'll end up in a sigblock.
@ooooh_matron, what do you reckon ?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
[FURTHER DRIFT]

"the sound of poppers on a body top.... Mating call of the 1990s"

[/FURTHER DRIFT}
Ah now I get it, press-studs !

There was me confusing them with other types of poppers...
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Yep, it's all a no brainer. Don't know anyone in a DCC role who didn't end up wearing those or (pre issue) Underarmour.
With you hundreds on the Tier One rods. With the silver treatment they have bograll smell even after a few days.
Not so keen on Underarmour after a lad had a incident with a t-shirt, it's as flame retardant as napalm.
But then it's horses for courses, if there's little or no IED threat and open flame is unlikely they're ideal.

Tampons - patrol medkit as a cheap, sterile, easily available wound packer (in absence of modern supplied versions) - from an SF medic
The SAMS okes were always known as Tampax Tiffies for that very.

Inner tubes, another good item to have with on deployment.

The velcro on clothing is a much bigger deal, because it is everywhere and makes noise both intentionally and accidentally:
It's not just the noise.
Had waterproofs on in typical Otterburn weather, and needed to take a slash. So there I was on my knees, trying not to frighten the horses while freeing Smaug when I managed to drag the head across the Velcro hook side and up the seam edge. That gets your attention.
So much so I had to repeat it several times until spent.
 

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