Why do people go to hospital?

#1
REVEALED: WEIRD INJURIES

More than 50 people were admitted to hospital after being struck by lightning in the past year and two people were injured by centipedes.

These are just some of the reasons people went to hospital as revealed on a list of weird and wonderful accidents in the last 12 months.

No fewer than 22 suffered mishaps involving nightwear either from setting them alight by accident or getting tangled up and nearly strangled.

The Department of Health data also included people requiring hospital treatment in the United Kingdom for accidents which happened overseas.

There were nearly a million people seen by emergency hospital staff in the 12 months to April 2004.

Six had been stung by scorpions, along with the 451 stung by hornets and 24 bitten by rats.

The house was no haven, with nine needing treatment for accidents with their beds and 22 exposed to "ignition or melting of nightwear" usually due to cigarettes or faulty electric blankets.

Other unusual problems included nine people who experienced "accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed" and a child who attended hospital after a "prolonged stay in a weightless environment".

Among more unusual accidents, those involving tools such as hammers affected 4,115 people, while around 2,000 more fell out of trees.

The data for admissions also included 138 people who had foreign objects left in their bodies following surgery.
What dreadful genetic makeup do these 'people' have, to be brought low by their own underwear? Are their parents related? Do they all live in Leominster? What was that kid doing in a wieghtless environment at all - let alone for 'a prolonged stay'? :D
 
#2
Calypso said:
REVEALED: WEIRD INJURIES

More than 50 people were admitted to hospital after being struck by lightning in the past year and two people were injured by centipedes.

These are just some of the reasons people went to hospital as revealed on a list of weird and wonderful accidents in the last 12 months.

No fewer than 22 suffered mishaps involving nightwear either from setting them alight by accident or getting tangled up and nearly strangled.

The Department of Health data also included people requiring hospital treatment in the United Kingdom for accidents which happened overseas.

There were nearly a million people seen by emergency hospital staff in the 12 months to April 2004.

Six had been stung by scorpions, along with the 451 stung by hornets and 24 bitten by rats.

The house was no haven, with nine needing treatment for accidents with their beds and 22 exposed to "ignition or melting of nightwear" usually due to cigarettes or faulty electric blankets.

Other unusual problems included nine people who experienced "accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed" and a child who attended hospital after a "prolonged stay in a weightless environment".

Among more unusual accidents, those involving tools such as hammers affected 4,115 people, while around 2,000 more fell out of trees.

The data for admissions also included 138 people who had foreign objects left in their bodies following surgery.
What dreadful genetic makeup do these 'people' have, to be brought low by their own underwear? Are their parents related? Do they all live in Leominster? What was that kid doing in a wieghtless environment at all - let alone for 'a prolonged stay'? :D


Bath full of p1ss?
 
#3
When I was young about 5, this silly kid was running about with an toy arrow in his mouth, he ran into a wall, and by fcuk it did hurt me, straight up to casualty, were I looked like a red indian who just had an ND or tried to commit suicide :lol:
 
#4
We usually send our elderly relatives to hospital so they can be euthanased by MRSA...
 
#5
Ahh, the silly season approaches. I am a nurse in an orthopaedic trauma operating theatre and the coming good weather will bring with it all sorts of silly injuries for us to patch up. One favourite is tendon damage caused by folk splitting burgers apart with a knife at barbaque time. Ladder and hammer accidents also feature heavily when the DIY 'experts' resume their activities.

Nothing quite tops the 'removal of foriegn body from rectum' patients. Luckily, these are all year round cases and never cease to amuse. You would not believe how many people acidentally sit on dildo's, candles, hair brushes, jam jars, golf balls, gerbills and light bulbs 8O
 
#6
primroseandblue said:
Ahh, the silly season approaches. I am a nurse in an orthopaedic trauma operating theatre and the coming good weather will bring with it all sorts of silly injuries for us to patch up. One favourite is tendon damage caused by folk splitting burgers apart with a knife at barbaque time. Ladder and hammer accidents also feature heavily when the DIY 'experts' resume their activities.

Nothing quite tops the 'removal of foriegn body from rectum' patients. Luckily, these are all year round cases and never cease to amuse. You would not believe how many people acidentally sit on dildo's, candles, hair brushes, jam jars, golf balls, gerbills and light bulbs 8O
when I was training as an ODA we had a guy with a dinner fork in his rectum, would not say how it got there. Interesting op a forkectomy
 

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