Why are we supporting a Afghan Whitewash?

A

ALVIN

Guest
#1
We all know that the elections in Afghanistan have been riddled with corruption to such a extent that they have become "a joke" ---- So why is our mental government supporting such a pathetic farse ??
 
#2
And our Government isn't corrupt. Maybe not on the same scale as the Afghan Government but still......

It takes time to form a democracy. Afghanistan is in its teething stages and could be for some time yet. There is more hope for Afghanistan then Iraq in my opinion.
 
#3
Fallschirmjager said:
And our Government isn't corrupt. Maybe not on the same scale as the Afghan Government but still......

It takes time to form a democracy. Afghanistan is in its teething stages and could be for some time yet. There is more hope for Afghanistan then Iraq in my opinion.
That's a very interesting view. NODUFF. Any chance you can explain why? I've not been to either (left in '94) and all I have is the news and this site for info.

Cheers :)
 
A

ALVIN

Guest
#4
I think that there is no hope for some of these middle eastern countrys, not for the want of trying!! --- These type of countrys have had it's culture for thousands of years. And all of a sudden, western powers are invading by force, to conquer, depose leadership, and change the way of thinking of it's people. ---- To suit who i ask? ---- How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? ----- I belive that if we did not bother them, then they would not bother us. Has the west now become the policeman of the world? --- Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? ---- Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? ----- Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization?
 
#5
Fallschirmjager
"And our Government isn't corrupt. Maybe not on the same scale as the Afghan Government but still......"

Yes, Er Maybe.

john
 
#6
ALVIN said:
I think that there is no hope for some of these middle eastern countrys, not for the want of trying!! --- These type of countrys have had it's culture for thousands of years. And all of a sudden, western powers are invading by force, to conquer, depose leadership, and change the way of thinking of it's people. ---- To suit who i ask? ---- How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? ----- I belive that if we did not bother them, then they would not bother us. Has the west now become the policeman of the world? --- Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? ---- Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? ----- Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization?
My bold: It used to be what was called "the white mans burden".
 
#7
ALVIN said:
I think that there is no hope for some of these middle eastern countrys, not for the want of trying!! --- These type of countrys have had it's culture for thousands of years. And all of a sudden, western powers are invading by force, to conquer, depose leadership, and change the way of thinking of it's people. ---- To suit who i ask? ---- How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? ----- I belive that if we did not bother them, then they would not bother us. Has the west now become the policeman of the world? --- Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? ---- Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? ----- Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization?
I feel your exasperation but....

To suit who? Us. It's no coincidence that Affers is one of the richest countries when it comes to natural resources: natural gas, uranium, iron ore and copper. Iraq is the 2nd richest place in oil and the oil is the cheapest to get hold of in the world. Russia invaded Affers in the 80s under the pretext of ridding the Mujhadeen. What it really wanted was the above and better trade links to India. We invaded Afghanistan after we crossed a few other countries off the list that we knew we couldn't invade.. Don't forget Bin Laden is a saudi. The 11/9 bombers....were Saudis. Could we have invaded Saudi Arabia? A country to this day that is funding the Taliban? Not without starting WW3 and not without plunging America into an oil crisis.

How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? It's a case of we have the bigger stick I'm 'fraid and as I recall the romans ripped us out of constant feuding tribes, brought democracy and roads to Britain and built up Europe. They did it by slaughtering every european country into submission.....but hey Europe is now the most developed place in the world.

Has the west now become the policeman of the world? The americans are the police and corrupt as they are, give me a Western policeman anytime when compared to the Chinese or Russians. The chinese have executed more of their own people than the combined deaths of world war 1 and 2. If you want a peak into the Chinese justice system please visit this link Chinas main source of organ donors come from executed prisoners

Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? Of course.

Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? It's going to supply America and Europe with enough oil until we have developed a more viable option. The natural resources will help fill the coffers of this bankrut country. If invading Iraq and Affers is the best way to ensure we don't become incredibly dependant on the Russians or the Saudi's it has to be done.

Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization? When compared to what else there is to offer the West is the highest and best bench mark. For a start we believe in Society and the citizen. The east believe in Tribes and the tribesman. Is the west always right and fair and just? No....but please look at what China considers acceptable to do to it's "citizens". 8 years old, 14 hour shifts, 7 days a week - human life worth 20 cents an hour....

But yes...it's in our interests to stabilize Afghanistan and Iraq. For security. The same reason why we stabilized Germany, Italy and Japan.
 
#8
ALVIN said:
I think that there is no hope for some of these middle eastern countrys, not for the want of trying!! True, but should we let them go on making people starve so they can produce the drugs that destroy OUR communities?--- These type of countrys have had it's culture for thousands of years. And all of a sudden, western powers are invading by force, to conquer, depose leadership, and change the way of thinking of it's people. And most Afghanis seem happy the Taliban were deposed (as told to me by ex-cadets who have served over in Helmand) as the Iraqis were when Saddam dropped out of power---- To suit who i ask? ---- How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? OK Broon and Bush are/were bad, but not quite despotic----- I belive that if we did not bother them, then they would not bother us. Has the west now become the policeman of the world? Haven't we been for a long time now?--- Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? Erm, 11 September 2001 - Twin Towers, Op Enduring Freedom (Septic Name for Veritas/Herrick) Started 7 October 2001---- Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? To Hell and damnation obviously!----- Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization?Erm, Civilisation started in Greece, carried across westwards, so Yes!
My comments in red above.
 
#9
Is it not a case of1) our Government simply continuing to hold on to the 'poisoned chalice' passed on by Mr.Blair, who was so determined to be seen as Mr.Bush's best mate he took his country into a hasty, ill conceived and probably illegal series of Interventions, in countries that seem to want very little of what we have to offer other than money.2)Our military doing what they have always done, i.e. carry out their orders,meet objectives given and hope that eventually the kit they have to do this with will eventually catch up with their needs.
 
#10
IN 1998 AMERICA WANTED NEW GOVERNMENT IN AFGHANISTAN TO ALLOW CONSTRUCTION OF OIL PIPELINE

America has wanted a new government in Afghanistan since at least 1998, three years before the attacks on 11 September 2001. The official report from a meeting of the U.S. Government's foreign policy committee on 12 February 1998, available on the U.S. Government website, confirms that the need for a West-friendly government was recognised long before the War on Terror that followed September 11th:
"The U.S. Government's position is that we support multiple pipelines...
The Unocal pipeline is among those pipelines that would receive our
support under that policy. I would caution that while we do support the
project, the U.S. Government has not at this point recognized any
governing regime of the transit country, one of the transit countries,
Afghanistan, through which that pipeline would be routed. But we do
support the project."
[ U.S. House of Reps., "U.S. Interests in the Central Asian Republics", 12 Feb 1998 ]
http://commdocs.house.gov/committees/intlrel/hfa48119.000/hfa48119_0.htm

"The only other possible route [for the desired oil pipeline] is across,
Afghanistan which has of course its own unique challenges."
[ "U.S. Interests in the Central Asian Republics", 12 Feb 1998 ]
http://commdocs.house.gov/committees/intlrel/hfa48119.000/hfa48119_0.htm

"CentGas can not begin construction until an internationally recognized
Afghanistan Government is in place."
[ "U.S. Interests in the Central Asian Republics", 12 Feb 1998 ]
http://commdocs.house.gov/committees/intlrel/hfa48119.000/hfa48119_0.htm
The Afghanistan oil pipeline project was finally able to proceed in May 2002. This could not have happened if America had not taken military action to replace the government in Afghanistan.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/2017044.stm

The project was abandoned in 1998 when a consortium led by US energy company Unocal withdrew from the project over fears of being seen to support Afghanistan's then Taliban government.
 
#11
The conquest of Afghan began way before 11/9 ***9/11****

The war on Afghanistan was sold to the public as a reaction to the attacks on 11 September 2001. However, the war was planned before the infamous 9/11 disaster, and the military action began long before the World Trade Center fell. The conquest of Afghanistan had been planned since at least 12 February 1998, and 9/11 happened just in time to secure public support for the attacks.

3rd November 1998 - attacks stop US oil pipeline:

Up to 80 cruise missiles were fired at Afghanistan and Sudan in August An American-funded training project in Afghanistan has closed down as a result of the US cruise missile attack on the country in August. The programme was funded by the American oil company, Unocal, which was once hoping to be involved in building a gas pipeline across the country from Turkmenistan to Pakistan.
(BBC News, "US attack closes US project", 3 November 1998. )
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/207183.stm

2nd January 1999 - US strikes targets in Afghanistan:
No sooner had the Taleban won a series of victories in the north, than the US launched an attack on camps in Afghanistan run by Saudi dissident Osama bin Laden, who had allegedly masterminded the bombing of US embassies in East Africa.
(BBC News, "Afghanistan: Campaign of conflict", 2 January 1999.)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/241477.stm

15th March 2001 - allies invade Afghanistan:
India is believed to have joined Russia, the USA and Iran in a concerted front against Afghanistan's Taliban regime. Military sources in Delhi, claim that the opposition Northern Alliance's capture of the strategic town of Bamiyan, was precipitated by the four countries' collaborative effort.
(Janes International Security News, "India joins anti-Taliban coalition", 15 March 2001.)
http://www.janes.com/security/international_security/news/jir/jir01......



3rd September 2001 - allies deploy huge task-force for “fictional” conflict:

The aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious has sailed from Portsmouth to lead the biggest Royal Navy and Royal Marine deployment since the Falklands. HMS Illustrious is the flagship of three groups of warships travelling to the Middle East to take part in exercise "Saif Sareea 2". More than 24 surface ships from Britain, plus two nuclear submarines, will be completing the 13,000 mile round trip. The operation, costing nearly £100m, will end with a major excercise before Christmas that will also involve the Army, Royal Air Force and Armed Forces of Oman. The strike force has been put together to take part in a conflict between the fictional forces of the so-called state of 'Alawham' and those of Oman.
(BBC News, Carrier heads for the Middle East, 3 September 2001. )
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/1522987.stm

11th September 2001 - the war comes home to America:

*** 9/11 ***

16th September 2001 - Bush prepares America to wage war overseas:

“I want to remind the American people that the prime suspect's [Osama Bin Laden] organisation is in a lot of countries,” Mr Bush told reporters on the White House lawn.
(BBC News, "America widens 'crusade' on terror", 16 September 2001. )
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/1547561.stm

18th September 2001 - diplomat reveals 9/11 “response” began before 9/11:

A former Pakistani diplomat has told the BBC that the US was planning military action against Osama Bin Laden and the Taleban even before last week's attacks. Niaz Naik, a former Pakistani Foreign Secretary, was told by senior American officials in mid-July that military action against Afghanistan would go ahead by the middle of October. Mr Naik said US officials told him of the plan at a UN-sponsored international contact group on Afghanistan which took place in Berlin. The wider objective, according to Mr Naik, would be to topple the Taleban regime and install a transitional government of moderate Afghans in its place - possibly under the leadership of the former Afghan King Zahir Shah. Mr Naik was told that Washington would launch its operation from bases in Tajikistan, where American advisers were already in place. He was told that Uzbekistan would also participate in the operation and that 17,000 Russian troops were on standby.Mr Naik was told that if the military action went ahead it would take place before the snows started falling in Afghanistan, by the middle of October at the latest.
(BBC News, "US 'planned attack on Taleban'", 18 September 2001. )
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/1550366.stm

In 1998 US Vice-President Dick Cheney said in a speech to oil industrialists:
"I cannot think of a time when we have had a region emerge as
suddenly to become as strategically significant as the Caspian"
Within four years the US military had overthrown the government of Afghanistan, and the construction of the Caspian Sea oil pipeline by US oil corporations had begun.

At the end of the day the world is teaming with natural resources, the world population has trippled in 40 years, the climate is f'ucked and the Chinese and the russians love us to pieces and the East have almost 8 thousand years of invasions led as far back as Alexander the great of the "west" worth of adoratioin to build on. There's lies, twisted truths and honest truths in this last paragraph. The easy part is telling what's what.
 
#12
Olympius said:
ALVIN said:
I think that there is no hope for some of these middle eastern countrys, not for the want of trying!! --- These type of countrys have had it's culture for thousands of years. And all of a sudden, western powers are invading by force, to conquer, depose leadership, and change the way of thinking of it's people. ---- To suit who i ask? ---- How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? ----- I belive that if we did not bother them, then they would not bother us. Has the west now become the policeman of the world? --- Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? ---- Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? ----- Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization?
I feel your exasperation but....

To suit who? Us. It's no coincidence that Affers is one of the richest countries when it comes to natural resources: natural gas, uranium, iron ore and copper. Iraq is the 2nd richest place in oil and the oil is the cheapest to get hold of in the world. Russia invaded Affers in the 80s under the pretext of ridding the Mujhadeen. What it really wanted was the above and better trade links to India. We invaded Afghanistan after we crossed a few other countries off the list that we knew we couldn't invade.. Don't forget Bin Laden is a saudi. The 11/9 bombers....were Saudis. Could we have invaded Saudi Arabia? A country to this day that is funding the Taliban? Not without starting WW3 and not without plunging America into an oil crisis.

How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? It's a case of we have the bigger stick I'm 'fraid and as I recall the romans ripped us out of constant feuding tribes, brought democracy and roads to Britain and built up Europe. They did it by slaughtering every european country into submission.....but hey Europe is now the most developed place in the world.

Has the west now become the policeman of the world? The americans are the police and corrupt as they are, give me a Western policeman anytime when compared to the Chinese or Russians. The chinese have executed more of their own people than the combined deaths of world war 1 and 2. If you want a peak into the Chinese justice system please visit this link Chinas main source of organ donors come from executed prisoners

Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? Of course.

Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? It's going to supply America and Europe with enough oil until we have developed a more viable option. The natural resources will help fill the coffers of this bankrut country. If invading Iraq and Affers is the best way to ensure we don't become incredibly dependant on the Russians or the Saudi's it has to be done.

Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization? When compared to what else there is to offer the West is the highest and best bench mark. For a start we believe in Society and the citizen. The east believe in Tribes and the tribesman. Is the west always right and fair and just? No....but please look at what China considers acceptable to do to it's "citizens". 8 years old, 14 hour shifts, 7 days a week - human life worth 20 cents an hour....

But yes...it's in our interests to stabilize Afghanistan and Iraq. For security. The same reason why we stabilized Germany, Italy and Japan.
Very well put!
 
A

ALVIN

Guest
#14
With todays news of the second round of the Elections being called off due to "too much corruption", I think it is safe to say that Government in Afghanistan stinks to high heaven, and what sort of signal is this "joke" sending out to the world??
 
#15
For general stability in the region and to give us an operating base and area of operations to conduct war against Radical Islam to prevent its spread in Pakistan
 

Andy_S

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
CCF CI

SNIP
Erm, Civilisation started in Greece, carried across westwards, so Yes!
SNIP

I think you will find that civilization actually started in Mesopotamia - or, as it is currently named, Iraq.

Olympius:

If you want to slag off Chinese standards of society and justice, fine. But China is increasingly an export focused economy: Those kids slaving for 20 cents an hour are making products you and I buy in our supermarkets.

The Chinese have exexuted more than were killed in WWI and II? Would be interested to see your source for that.

As for the Romans civilizing Europe: Big maybe. Between the Roman Era and ours, were the Dark Ages and Medieval Christendom. The Romans gave us a good model in terms of law, order and infrastructure, but to call the subsequent eras, or even Victorian Britain fair, just and equitable - or "civilized" if you prefer - societies would be highly debatable.

And while I am sure the full story has not yet been told as regards how important natural resources were in precipitating the War on Terror, I am unconvinced that this war (if we can call it that) was a resource grab: Right now, it looks as if the Chinese are going after the resources exploitation deals in Afghan, while we/"The West" do the fighting.

The fact that the US desired a user-friendly government in Afghan in '98 - governments are constantly doing risk analyses, debating policy, commissioning briefs, etc - is hardly uncontrovertial evidence of a causus belli for the invasion in '01.
 
#17
Olympius said:
I feel your exasperation but....
...you just thought you’d indulge in some ethnocentric circular arguing?

Olympius said:
To suit who? Us. It's no coincidence that Affers is one of the richest countries when it comes to natural resources: natural gas, uranium, iron ore and copper.
That would imply that the people who run Western strategic planning are sophisticated enough to come up with this grand guignol drama for the purpose of grabbing AFGs natural resources but not sophisticated enough to stop themselves being gazumped or to pull their arm out of the mincing machine once they realise they have been.

Olympius said:
How would we feel if the same were being done to us in the western world? It's a case of we have the bigger stick I'm 'fraid and as I recall the romans ripped us out of constant feuding tribes, brought democracy and roads to Britain and built up Europe. They did it by slaughtering every European country into submission.....but hey Europe is now the most developed place in the world.
Largely because the European definition of ‘developed’ has supplanted all others - for the moment. A self-licking lollypop will generally find itself extremely tasty.

The most hotly-contested debate in development studies right now is whether it’s capable of delivering anything other than ‘more stuff for the lucky few’. Remember that none of these ‘most developed’ countries were self-sufficient in either raw materials or industrial capacity and only got their developed status by ripping off some other poor sod. He who lives by the free-market dies by the free-market.

Olympius said:
Has the west now become the policeman of the world? The americans are the police and corrupt as they are, give me a Western policeman anytime when compared to the Chinese or Russians. The chinese have executed more of their own people than the combined deaths of world war 1 and 2. If you want a peak into the Chinese justice system please visit this link Chinas main source of organ donors come from executed prisoners

Let me take this one as two separate items. The Americans aren’t acting as world police because like it or not and despite the best efforts of international organisations, there is no meaningful equivalent of criminal law in the international arena simply because there is no way to sanction nations who don’t obey the rules unless they’re weak ones. At best, America is a world vigilante and not accountable as a policeman would be.

Comparing policemen between countries just winds up ultimately in your saying ‘I like this best because it’s what I’m used to’. I know some good Chinese cops and some makeweights I wouldn’t trust an inch: the same can be said about Strathclyde’s finest. Where the main difference lies IMO is in the ingrained assumption that ‘the Law’ is something concrete instead of just the will of the bloke in charge. Unfortunately, this is exceedingly fragile and I see increasing incidences where I believe our police are forgetting this assumption.

I’d like to know where you get your information on China executing more of it’s people than the casualties of both World Wars. Even if you’re only referring to China’s casualties alone, that has a strong whiff of bullshit about it. The trail of devastation that the Japs left in northern and eastern China took decades to even begin to recover and there is simply no way a similar feat could go unobserved or undocumented. The execution rate is a closely guarded secret, but one thing that can be said for cold, hard fact is that a death rate of the kind of magnitude you’re implying simply could not be hidden. There would be evidence of demographic collapse; folk history of massacre; anecdotal evidence of missing parents/siblings/children; and physical evidence of massive casualties and the disposal thereof. Look at the Great Leap Forward to see what I mean.



Olympius said:
Are we provoking terrorism by our actions? Of course.
Just ‘of course’? No dissection of whether it constitutes a rational course of action or even whether the pros outweigh the cons? I’m not trying to pick a fight, just to see where you were going.

Olympius said:
Where is all this death and distruction going to lead us? It's going to supply America and Europe with enough oil until we have developed a more viable option. The natural resources will help fill the coffers of this bankrut country. If invading Iraq and Affers is the best way to ensure we don't become incredibly dependant on the Russians or the Saudi's it has to be done.
Again, if the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan were genuinely about securing resources then that’s been bloody badly handled. ‘Blood and treasure’ seems to be more of both flowing outward every day. Far from securing our supply they seem to be diminishing our ability to exert power every day.

Of course we could always cut our cloth to suit our purse. Live within our national means sort of thing, instead of setting a precedent of piracy that other nations will be quick to follow when this old lion can no longer roar convincingly. Just a thought.

Olympius said:
Is the west really a "benchmark" for world civilization? When compared to what else there is to offer the West is the highest and best bench mark. For a start we believe in Society and the citizen. The east believe in Tribes and the tribesman. Is the west always right and fair and just? No....but please look at what China considers acceptable to do to it's "citizens". 8 years old, 14 hour shifts, 7 days a week - human life worth 20 cents an hour....
I refer the Honourable Gentleman to my earlier ‘self-licking lollypop’ comment. If the criterion for civilisation is ‘most like us’ then obviously ‘us’ gets high marks. The earliest examples of civilisation weren’t found in the west, nor arguably are the greatest. It depends on what you want out of civilisation.

Those kids in the Far East you’re alluding to work long hours because it’s that or starvation. What do you want their governments to do, ban them from earning a crust? Our civilised countries also have a track record of exploiting children. It’s not that long ago in the grand scheme that the Factories Act had to be forced through by quite desperate measures and in the teeth of opposition determined that the sky would fall in if they weren’t allowed to work kids into an early grave in order to ensure a few extra guineas a year profit. If you think it doesn’t still go on and wouldn’t on a much wider scale given half a chance then you’ve been ignoring a decades worth of investigative journalism and wage negotiation.

Olympius said:
But yes...it's in our interests to stabilize Afghanistan and Iraq. For security. The same reason why we stabilized Germany, Italy and Japan.
We stabilised the Axis powers because we found them useful in the new game that was being played. Which new game is being played now?
 
#18
And admit the earliest signs of defeat?

We can't win an overall military victory because this campaign will just go on and on. As such the government will be hoping for a puppet government and all the things needed to say "Look we imposed democracy on the savages and it worked, hurrah for us."

The fact is like in Iraq before it, Northern Ireland before that and and Vietnam before that we will get neither of these wins and our objectives will not be met. Their own influencial leaders will decide what the end result will be and how it will come about. We'll talk around a table and pretend it was our idea.

That is why soldiers should not think too hard about the politics. Concentrate on the small military and tactical victories that our team achieves everyday until the government get bored and bring you home.
 
A

ALVIN

Guest
#19
I still think that Gordon Brown is wrong to support a bent foreign Government at the expence of lives of British service people.
Does he not understand the fact that he is provoking terror in Britain
by following American policy of military intervention???
I belive that we would be left alone by the terror groups If government
were not so up America's bum!!
 
#20
For those people who think that by pulling out now, after so much hard work has been accomplished, that the Taliban and AQ will simply drop their arms and become friends with the west is a bit delusional. Success should not be measured simply by a military victory.

There should not be any delusions about quick success in Afghanistan. Afghanistan does not have the capacity to become what we would like it to be. Despite the best of intentions, we must guard against viewing the problem through western eyes only. The process of establishing peace in Afghanistan is certainly arduous, but not impossible. 60 different countries involved in Afghanistan are striving to make a better life for Afghans, however it takes decades and centuries for societies to develop.

The Afghans themselves, in Kandahar, have rebuilt the farm co-op system to buy a regenerated cash crop system of nuts, dried fruit, apricots, grapes, pomegranates and the things Kandahar has been noted for as an exporter traditionally.

Troops have been instrumental in the reconstruction of roads, culverts and canals that are helping to improve the Afghan economy.

Success should be measured in the number of Afghans employed in a legitimate and functional farm economy. The more people who are employed in this legitimate farm economy, the fewer people going to be growing opium for the drug rings or being directly employed by the Taliban.

Success should also be measured by the number of new schools being built, by the number of children that attend these schools compared to just a few years ago.

Success is also about the number of women that are now allowed to work.

Success can be measured by the new hospitals, and also by the number of Doctors and Nurses that are being trained by the coalition forces.

Success can be measured by the number of Afghan Troops and Police that are being trained, a number that will eventually be large enough to defend their own lifestyle.

The Afghan Public Protection Force is an Afghan-led program that provides enhanced security to designated districts in key provinces, bringing greater stability and strengthened- community development. Programs include building Mosques, Schools and Clinics and repairing Irrigation Systems.

The paragraphs below are taken from http://kabul.usembassy.gov/success_stories.html


The Czech PRT, consisting of nine civilian experts and 275 soldiers, has been assisting the people of Logar since March 2008. Support of the health system, infrastructure, security, agriculture, irrigation and independent journalism are also among its priorities. Its annual budget is 4.5 million USD.

The Czech PRT in Logar started construction of two new girl schools in Khoshi at the end of April. Cooperation among the provincial government, local community, and the PRT played a key role in the preparation of this project.

Afghan National Security Force members, assisted by Special Operations Forces, provided medical treatment and passed out humanitarian goods to local villagers May 17.
Afghan Commandos with the 201st Corps, and Afghan National Police cared for those with physical ailments, and distributed shoes, first aid kits, school supplies, coats, hygiene kits, blankets, sweaters, rubber boots, clothes, food and soccer balls.

The ANP also provided medical treatment and humanitarian aid in Sarobi District, Shabadeen Village. This area has traditionally been outside the reach of the government, and the police commander felt the government should provide assistance to all its citizens. More than 200 men, women and children received rice, sugar, cooking oil, school supplies, soccer balls and hygiene kits.

After the goods were distributed, the ANP conducted a meeting with the village leaders. The local leaders said they weren’t afraid of the Taliban increasing strength in the area, because they had confidence in the government’s ability to provide security for them.

On April 16, the State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs presented the Nangarhar Chief Prosecutor and a representative of the Nangarhar Police Department with $52,000 worth of equipment to help the criminal investigation police and prosecutors be more responsive to alleged criminal conduct. The ceremony followed the conclusion of in-depth training conducted by INL’s Justice Security Sector Support Program (JSSP), an effort to strengthen the capacity of the Afghanistan criminal justice sector institutions and the justice professionals working in these institutions. The equipment, which included motorcycles, bicycles, helmets, copy machines, digital video cameras, microcassette voice recorders, lockers and filing cabinets, will also help them reinforce the investigative techniques they learned at the JSSP training by improving their capacity to keep and maintain evidence and records.

Afghanistan’s energy needs vastly outweigh its domestic production. Today, only 10-12% of Afghan citizens have access to electricity on a regular basis, and the country needs an influx of energy resources and infrastructure to provide reliable power throughout the country.
To fuel development efforts, USAID has launched a number of initiatives to increase energy output, such as rebuilding dams and power plants and importing electricity from neighboring countries.
 

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