Why are MOD MMA rates lower than the Government's approved rates?

TexasTom

Crow
Had to put a claim in and this got me wondering. Who justifies this 0.25p rate compared to the Government's 0.45p? Apparently the NHS get an even higher rate than that.
 
Had to put a claim in and this got me wondering. Who justifies this 0.25p rate compared to the Government's 0.45p? Apparently the NHS get an even higher rate than that.
Different firms have different rates.

Also the Army likes to save money.
 
Know someone send by train for course, non stop journey 6 hours cost of food more than he could claim back from MOD, Current rates of pay for some CS staff are at 2006 levels, no wonder they cannot fill some jobs
 

Cane Mala

Swinger
As said by others, each company or organisation is allowed to set the rate wherever they like (and staff will bear) however it is my experience that the lower rate is often applied when additional benefits such as car allowance are within the salary package
 

Truxx

LE
The 45p is a bit misleading.That is how much you could claim back from HMRC per (business) mile if you meet the criteria. It is not the amount that any organization should necessarily be reimbursing.

I think if you are eligible for Official Duty Rate (last paid in roman times) the MOD reimbursement rate is much higher and nearer the tax-allowance rate.
 
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Had to put a claim in and this got me wondering. Who justifies this 0.25p rate compared to the Government's 0.45p? Apparently the NHS get an even higher rate than that.
When you say "the Government's 0.45p" what you actually are referring to is the HMRC tax-free 45 pence per mile which your employer can give you. But only for the first 10,000 miles. It's not a suggested rate that they should give you, just one that won't attract more tax. After 10,000 miles, they tax anything over 25 pence per mile. So in a way, your employer is protecting you from inadvertently not paying tax that you should and falling foul of HMRC. And, on a similar note, if you only got 25p per mile, you can claim back the tax on the extra 20p per mile that you didn't get, which is, if you pay tax at the 20% rate, an extra four whole pennies per mile, or forty quid for a 1000 mile trip.

Other people who get a higher mileage rate tend to be people who, unlike you, have to drive from place to place as part of their daily job, like a District Nurse who has to visit patients in their own homes, so their employers choose to compensate them for having to use their own car rather than the alternative of having to provide a car for them. You aren't in that position, you can choose to drive your own car, get a pool vehicle, or get a rail warrant. If you choose to use your own car, you do so knowing what the mileage rate is.
 
I happily recall being able to claim lodging in the smoke in the 90's where the maximum was £50 a night, not actuals, £50 and IIRC that included breakfast and an evening meal. Then you had to rely on a booking agent.
I stayed in some proper shitholes thanks to Her Majesty. One, the only option other than kipping in the car, involved a 'hotel' that as you walked in, you were greeted with Asians cooking on gas stoves in the communal hall, sheets that were grey and an all pervading stench of filth. We stayed in the car and couldn't claim because we had no receipt. We discussed ways to track down the civil servants responsible and seriously fvcking up their lives.
I'm not talking about the 1800's here, this was in the mid 90's.

ETA: Sorry to go completely OT.
 
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And you can claim the difference back (up to 45p a mile total) from the revenue.
indeed. I halved my tax bill a few years back by claiming the difference on (1* authorised) HDT from MoD as v the HMRC rate (including the completely arbitrary, and frankly bul1shit, "personal contribution" of however many miles it is).

This is a slight aside but JPA is simply a treasury creep from the savings that amount from PAYE. The vast majority of PAYE employees don't put in a tax return despite incurring tax deductable expenses every day as the culture is no that "you don't need to worry, we've done it all for you".

With the forces, it is more insidious as you have the added factor of fear of the CoC. Pte Fucknuts is terrified of being accused of fraud if he puts in an erroneous JPA claim so simply doesn't bother.

The persistent narrative of the last few Chancellors of the Exchequer, that there is a moral obligation to pay the full tax bill (as dictated by HMRC), is in conflict with the combative nature of our income tax system, which originally required the private citizen to avoid their liability on the basis that the revenue man would be trying to screw them.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
You my also be able to claim non receipted misc expenses when away from home , betwen 5-10 pounds ,covers items like phone hoome , cleaning paapers ec.Also if employer pays 2nd class and you go 1st you may also be able to claim the difference...see HMRC web site for the latter
 
You my also be able to claim non receipted misc expenses when away from home , betwen 5-10 pounds ,covers items like phone hoome , cleaning paapers ec.Also if employer pays 2nd class and you go 1st you may also be able to claim the difference...see HMRC web site for the latter
Straying from the original question still further but it is also worth checking if your trade qualifies for a Fixed Rate Expense Allowance (FREA) for job “essentials” which often includes a small travel allowance. It can be claimed in a block annually and doesn’t require receipts. Additional to that, certain Trade Bodies are listed by HMRC and you can claim tax relief on some of the membership fees.

As an example I can claim £1250 FREA and 67% of my membership fees at the Higher Rate. It comes out at several grand p.a. in my pocket for the sake of 30 seconds one finger typing on my Self Assessment return. IIRC if you’ve not claimed you can backdate 5 years.
 
Different firms have different rates.

Also the Army likes to save money.
The Army doesn't like to pay it in the first place. At least in the days when the RAPC were around. You would think it was there own money. I am sure things are much better now with the AGC.
 
The Army doesn't like to pay it in the first place. At least in the days when the RAPC were around. You would think it was there own money. I am sure things are much better now with the AGC.
Wrong, even after decades of alcohol abuse, I can still remember being called into the admin office at my first posting (in Boxheadland) on my first day back off leave (back in UK) to sign the travel claim that the Pay Sgt had filled in for me. Didn't happen after the AGC assimilated the Pay Corps.
 
Wrong, even after decades of alcohol abuse, I can still remember being called into the admin office at my first posting (in Boxheadland) on my first day back off leave (back in UK) to sign the travel claim that the Pay Sgt had filled in for me. Didn't happen after the AGC assimilated the Pay Corps.
Well we all have different experiences.
 

morsk

LE
Because FTB probably
 

Truxx

LE
Wrong, even after decades of alcohol abuse, I can still remember being called into the admin office at my first posting (in Boxheadland) on my first day back off leave (back in UK) to sign the travel claim that the Pay Sgt had filled in for me. Didn't happen after the AGC assimilated the Pay Corps.
As a senior captain I was obliged, once upon a time (late 1980s probably) to overnight in the transit accommodation at RAF Lyneham. In my cabin was a little booklet outlining all the different claims and allowances that were available, and how to claim them.

I am sure that there was an Army equivalent somewhere.

Or perhaps

Not
 
As a senior captain I was obliged, once upon a time (late 1980s probably) to overnight in the transit accommodation at RAF Lyneham. In my cabin was a little booklet outlining all the different claims and allowances that were available, and how to claim them.

I am sure that there was an Army equivalent somewhere.

Or perhaps

Not
I thought the RAF just book into their 5 star star hotel and put everything on the firm's credit card.
 
As a senior captain I was obliged, once upon a time (late 1980s probably) to overnight in the transit accommodation at RAF Lyneham. In my cabin was a little booklet outlining all the different claims and allowances that were available, and how to claim them.

I am sure that there was an Army equivalent somewhere.

Or perhaps

Not
I thought the RAF just book into their 5 star star hotel and put everything on the firm's credit card.
That’s what he said.
He stayed in the Lyneham transit Hilton, and in the room was a leaflet that listed all the room service claim items and the number to call room service, which would bring up a minion with a trolley and a slip to sign
 

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