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Whooosh, Bang- UK's WWII Rockets

From an earlier link . . .

 
Later versions of the Fairey Swordfish had their fabric lower wings replaced with metal ones, so they could fire RPs. I wonder if this why the aircraft was produced as late as 1944, and still in service on VE Day?

I have no idea what other naval aircraft carried it.



What sort of rockets were fired from Landing Craft (Rocket)?

 

offog

LE
Later versions of the Fairey Swordfish had their fabric lower wings replaced with metal ones, so they could fire RPs. I wonder if this why the aircraft was produced as late as 1944, and still in service on VE Day?
It was fitted with radar and used extensively at night negating its disadvantages of being slow.
 

HE117

LE
What were the similarities between the air dropped (launched a better term?) rockets for anti ground and shipping and the ground launched ones for anti air? In terms of the actual rocket not the warhead.
Did the UK use rocket artillery or was that largely the Russians and Germans?

I assume there are some differences between what the UK developed and other peoples developments, are there many fundamental differences?

Sorry for the questions, I really don't know enough to contribute to the thread other than to ask bone questions.
There is no such thing as a bone question mate..

The main difference between the A to S rocket and the S to A was the fuzing.. A to S is invariably impact fuzed wheras S to A is usually time. I suspect the rocket motor propellant grain may have different profiles to give different thrust characteristics, but I don't know for sure at this point. Manufacture was the key variable, and almost all UK rockets were either 2",3" or 5" however it would have been relatively trivial to change the dies in the press to produce different shapes of propellant grain. The burning rate of cordite is controlled by the surface area of the grain, the larger the area, the faster the burn and the higher the pressure in the motor casing.

..
 
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Yokel

LE
Did the RAF have any air to air rocket projects in WW2? The RAF did fly jet fighter sorties with the Gkoster Meteor, and encountered the Me262 in combat, so would they have been looking for weapons beyond cannon?

The Luftwaffe was looking into these things. I expect @Archimedes knows more.
 

Tyk

LE
Did the RAF have any air to air rocket projects in WW2? The RAF did fly jet fighter sorties with the Gkoster Meteor, and encountered the Me262 in combat, so would they have been looking for weapons beyond cannon?

The Luftwaffe was looking into these things. I expect @Archimedes knows more.

Didn't the Germans experiment using a rocket weapon from night fighters firing at an upwards forward angle against bomber streams? Fairly sure I read it wasn't that useful.
With the rocketry of the time I suspect in fighter vs fighter combat rockets wouldn't have been that useful compared to the usual machineguns and cannons.
 
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HE117

LE
Did the RAF have any air to air rocket projects in WW2? The RAF did fly jet fighter sorties with the Gkoster Meteor, and encountered the Me262 in combat, so would they have been looking for weapons beyond cannon?

The Luftwaffe was looking into these things. I expect @Archimedes knows more.
Not that I am aware of.. I think all the allied air launched missiles were unguided air to surface rockets.

The RAF did not really consider air to air until after the war, and when some of the guidance systems that the Germans had developed came west..

The Firestreak was the first A to A missile to enter RAF service in 1957, a year after the US fielded the AIM 9 Sidewinder.
 

HE117

LE
Didn't the Germans experiment using a rocket weapon from night fighters firing at an upwards forward angle against bomber streams? Fairly sure I read it wasn't that useful.
With the rocketry of the time I suspect in fighter vs fighter combat rockets wouldn't have been that useful compared to the usual machineguns and canons.
Are you not thinking about the upward firing schrag musak cannons which were extremely effective...
 

Tyk

LE
There is no such thing as a bone question mate..

The main difference between the A to S rocket and the S to A was the fuzing.. A to S is invariably impact fuzed wheras S to A is usually time. I suspect the rocket motor propellant grain may have different profiles to give different thrust characteristics, but I don't know for sure at this point. Manufacture was the key variable, and almost all UK rockets were either 2",3" or 5" however it would have been relatively trivial to change the dies in the press to produce different shapes of propellant grain. The burning rate of cordite is controlled by the surface area of the grain, the larger the area, the faster the burn and the higher the pressure in the motor casing.

..

Interesting, so essentially the same at the rocketry end of things, not what I expected to be honest, but it's rational.
 
There weren't any air-to-air engagements between Meteors and Me262s.

The RAF didn't use rockets for air to air purposes - they were too inaccurate to be trusted. The lack of faith in air-to-air rockets in the UK was perhaps demonstrated later on by the fact that although the Lightning and Sea Vixen could carry them - and in the case of the latter, the two drop-down rocket trays were in the place where the 30mm cannon had been on the DH110 - they weren't used (NB that there were safety concerns over the Sea Vixen's rockets).

The USAF's faith in rocket interceptors was slightly shaken by the 'Battle of Palmdale'. An F6F Hellcat drone decided to go off for a final sojourn on a route of its own choosing and F-89 Scorpions were sent up to shoot it down. They expended over 200 rockets, a few of which glanced off the Hellcat, but most missed. The rockets caused extensive brush fires which took over 2 days to bring under control, and at least one rocket was seen bouncing along the main street of a town. The only 'kill' was a pick up truck sitting outside a roadside diner. The Hellcat crashed from fuel starvation and the USAF started thinking even more seriously about guided missiles.
 

Tyk

LE
Are you not thinking about the upward firing schrag musak cannons which were extremely effective...

Could be, but I recall donkeys years ago reading about rockety things, I may well have got it mixed up with the cannons.
 

offog

LE
Did the RAF have any air to air rocket projects in WW2? The RAF did fly jet fighter sorties with the Gkoster Meteor, and encountered the Me262 in combat, so would they have been looking for weapons beyond cannon?

The Luftwaffe was looking into these things. I expect @Archimedes knows more.
I don't think the Meteor encountered any 262s or German jets as they were not authorise to fly across FLOT. they did not want the Germans to get hold of the superior metallurgy of hte Meteor engines.
 

Yokel

LE
My poor writing - sorry! I meant that RAF types such as the later versions of the Spitfire encountered the Me262. Was this why the machine guns in the earlier ones were replaced with cannon?

If doing a lot of damage to an enemy aircraft quickly was a top priority, were there any any air to air rocket or missile projects?
 
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Then there was the rocket-propelled gap-jumping/debogging Universal Carrier.

And the Panjandrum.

Hedgehog.
 
The lack of faith in air-to-air rockets in the UK was perhaps demonstrated later on by the fact that although the Lightning and Sea Vixen could carry them - and in the case of the latter, the two drop-down rocket trays were in the place where the 30mm cannon had been on the DH110 - they weren't used (NB that there were safety concerns over the Sea Vixen's rockets).

Q seems to have faith in them. They are the only things on "Little Nelly" that operate anywhere near realistically.


60 a minute indeed.
 

offog

LE
My poor writing - sorry! I meant that RAF types such as the later versions of the Spitfire encountered the Me262. Was this why the machine guns in the earlier ones were replaced with cannon?

If doing a lot of damage to an enemy aircraft quickly was a top priority, were there any any air to air rocket projects?
I think that was more to do with the 303 being ineffective against armoured aircraft. You hit with a cannon with a mix of HE/AP/Trac and it definitely goes down. I remember reading that although the Zero was good it had very little armour and so even a 303/30 hit was more often a kill and a .5 definitely made a mess of your day.
 
My poor writing - sorry! I meant that RAF types such as the later versions of the Spitfire encountered the Me262. Was this why the machine guns in the earlier ones were replaced with cannon?

If doing a lot of damage to an enemy aircraft quickly was a top priority, were there any any air to air rocket or missile projects?

Cannon were specified for RAF fighters from before the war. The Air Staff knew that the .303's performance would become inadequate before too long (although it perhaps happened a few months earlier than anticipated). The difficulty was getting the Hispano into mass production and then dealing with the inevitable teething problems which mounting a cannon designed to be fitted to fire through the propeller hub (it was a moteur canon after all) in the wings of a fighter would lead to. Heavy MGs were looked at, but it was thought that they'd be nothing more than an intermediate step and would also be outclassed by the armour on German aircraft (this turned out to be untrue, of course), and thus not really worth proceeding with.

By 1943/44, the value of the 0.5 inch round had become obvious thanks to the RAF's P-40s, Mustang I/II and the Wildcat/Martlet in FAA service (and a few Fulmars). The end result was that the larger machine gun was fitted to Spitfires with the 'E' wing. Typhoons and Tempests, of course used four 20mm cannon.
 

HE117

LE
Then there was the rocket-propelled gap-jumping/debogging Universal Carrier.

And the Panjandrum.

Hedgehog.
Ah no... Hedgehog was a spigot mortar... get thee to the PIAT thread!
 

ABNredleg

War Hero
Not that I am aware of.. I think all the allied air launched missiles were unguided air to surface rockets.

The RAF did not really consider air to air until after the war, and when some of the guidance systems that the Germans had developed came west..

The Firestreak was the first A to A missile to enter RAF service in 1957, a year after the US fielded the AIM 9 Sidewinder.
The 8th AF trialed 4.5” rockets with proximity fuses in the air-to-air role on B24s. They were fired from dual rearward facing launching tubes and were intended to break up formations of German fighters. Trials were successful but the war ended before operational use.
 

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