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Whooosh, Bang- UK's WWII Rockets

HE117

LE
And you'd entrust this to people like Sluggy?
There was always a bit of cat & mousery with the clerks over this! A good clerk would keep things moving by a subtle mix of threat & bribery..

Sluggy was a good clerk!
 

GrumpyOG

Old-Salt
If you are looking for a completionist's account of ww2 British rocketry, there are also the rocket-launched grappling hooks to consider. I haven't found much about them yet, but other Arrsers may know more.

View attachment 505262
View attachment 505263

I was taught those on my AT course in 1982, known as HARP (Holdfast Apparatus Rocket Projectile, or Projected it was a long time ago) as they were still in service, likewise Baby Viper a number of which were sent to the Falklands during the war, don’t know if they were ever used though.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Sluggy was a good clerk!
Indeed she was but I still can't help thinking that there must be entire files somewhere that comprise shredded strips of paper held together with sellotape.

Everyone loves shredding.
 
Yup. Seems so. Seems to be a Bomb on a string idea. Plane flies into the cable, suspended by a parachute, and the bomb is dragged into contact and BOOM.

Which sort of raises the question about the common story about this type of weapon, that a salvo launcher system earlier in the war was test fired and all the mines were blown onto the ships rigging/superstructure, and the entire idea was abandoned as a silly idea.

And yet, here the UK is expending time and money, fitting these things to war ships for at least D-Day, and possibly earlier than that. If it was such an abject failure... why continue? I found a similar contradiction when I was looking at the Bombard. for such a supposedly shite weapon, the UK sure did produce an awful lot of them. Which indicates something in the common story is either wrong, and one of those Declinist buggers spreading negative waves, or we are missing an important piece of information.

I believe it was political, certain people had the ear of Churchill and then it was off to the races with massive orders and no complaints listened too upstairs unless the right person got to hear of it and then it got scrapped.

Read

Britain's War Machine: Weapons, Resources and Experts in the Second World War
by David Edgerton

For a superb look behind the 'bumbling along' popular image to the processes and people, its a real eyeopener mostly in a good way, stuff like the bombard was the exception rather than the rule.
 

HE117

LE
HARP was a rocket anchor for the Combat Engineer Tractor...

... mainly because of the Effing Gurt Buckit and the non involvement of a Nav Arch in the vehicle design, the beast had great difficulty in getting out of anything more than gentle, concrete lined landing hard...(allegedly)..

Hmm 82 AT eh! I suspect our paths may have crossed...!
 

GrumpyOG

Old-Salt
HARP was a rocket anchor for the Combat Engineer Tractor...

... mainly because of the Effing Gurt Buckit and the non involvement of a Nav Arch in the vehicle design, the beast had great difficulty in getting out of anything more than gentle, concrete lined landing hard...(allegedly)..

Hmm 82 AT eh! I suspect our paths may have crossed...!

You are probably correct, it was nearly 40 years ago and I never saw one in the flesh afterwards, if so what was the rocket powered grappling iron called??
My course was 82A and was followed by a posting back to Kineton (thanks to Jock Willy as I was a rugby player) until late 1985 when it was off to Complete Surprise Bn (Lance platoon), due to a crew cut, wire rimmed glasses and an ability to shoot I had a “Japanese” nickname!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

HE117

LE
You are probably correct, it was nearly 40 years ago and I never saw one in the flesh afterwards, if so what was the rocket powered grappling iron called??
My course was 82A and was followed by a posting back to Kineton (thanks to Jock Willy as I was a rugby player) until late 1985 when it was off to Complete Surprise Bn (Lance platoon), due to a crew cut, wire rimmed glasses and an ability to shoot I had a “Japanese” nickname!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ah yes...! You suffered the same fate as me, although I got posted back into the School..!
 

tiv

LE
I know this is from WWI but thought it might be of interest - Rocket Message Carrying Mk 1:

 
I know this is from WWI but thought it might be of interest - Rocket Message Carrying Mk 1:


I guess they had to find something to replace Speckled Jim...
 
Ok a question or two, as I'm not used to dealing with those deviants in the RAF.

1: Can anyone come up with a reason why Manston was considered the highest priority for fitting the PAC to, and not, say Biggin Hill, or somewhere important? Note this decision was taken before the Battle of France had begun.

2: There's a list of RAF ranks, and they keep talking about ACH's. Anyone know what this translates too? I guessed AC is Aircraftsman.
 
2: There's a list of RAF ranks, and they keep talking about ACH's. Anyone know what this translates too? I guessed AC is Aircraftsman.
ACH or ACM? Air Chief Marshal.
 
Ok a question or two, as I'm not used to dealing with those deviants in the RAF.

1: Can anyone come up with a reason why Manston was considered the highest priority for fitting the PAC to, and not, say Biggin Hill, or somewhere important? Note this decision was taken before the Battle of France had begun.

2: There's a list of RAF ranks, and they keep talking about ACH's. Anyone know what this translates too? I guessed AC is Aircraftsman.

Just a guess, but Manston was used as an emergency landing runway later in the war, because it was long and concrete. It was also close to France so vulnerable.

Other runways (like Hawkinge) were protected from capture by glider-borne forces by TNT-filled pipes buried under the runways: perhaps because of the size (and the concrete) it was more suitable to use PAC?
 

HE117

LE
Just a guess, but Manston was used as an emergency landing runway later in the war, because it was long and concrete. It was also close to France so vulnerable.

Other runways (like Hawkinge) were protected from capture by glider-borne forces by TNT-filled pipes buried under the runways: perhaps because of the size (and the concrete) it was more suitable to use PAC?

Ehrr no!

The effing things were filled with mining explosive, usually some form of gelignite which slowly broke down over the years decanting NG into the junction boxes and the threads of the pipes.

Lovely!
 
Ehrr no!

The effing things were filled with mining explosive, usually some form of gelignite which slowly broke down over the years decanting NG into the junction boxes and the threads of the pipes.

Lovely!

Makes sense. At the time I guess TNT would have been in great demand for more pressing uses.

Thread drift: in Libya in 2010 I saw the local civil defence teams using gelignite to demolish an unexploded aircraft bomb. The donor charge was about the size of an MFO box...apparently the Army wouldn’t let them have TNT.
 

HE117

LE
Makes sense. At the time I guess TNT would have been in great demand for more pressing uses.

Thread drift: in Libya in 2010 I saw the local civil defence teams using gelignite to demolish an unexploded aircraft bomb. The donor charge was about the size of an MFO box...apparently the Army wouldn’t let them have TNT.
Should have hung on to the Semtex H then instead of giving it to to PIRA then...?.
 

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