Who is your favourite Artist/Painter

#62
Vermeer is my all time favourite artist, however David Shepherd for his wildlife paintings, as well as railway scenes!
I too have a weak spot for Shepard's wildlife paintings. There were a couple of aviation based paintings of his hanging at Cranwell, or at least there used to be; liked them a lot. Story goes that Shepherd used to hitch a lift with the RAF quite a bit. He got the elephants and in return the RAF got quite a collection of aviation paintings. Wonder what happed to all of them with squadrons being stood down and bases being closed. Many of them would be worth a few bob these days.

I have a couple from the Scottish artist James McIntosh Patrick, memories of the auld country.

Do like some of the stuff of the Dutch/Flemish Masters with Rembrandt up front. The Rijksmuseum is a joy to visit. The depth of colour he manages to achieve is excellent. I have a copy of a particular painting that my grandparents paid quite a bit of money for. I'll have to look it out. Its a picture of a couple of merchants in Dutch house talking to a women at a table with what looks like the maid in the background. My straight laced grandparents would have passed out if they knew that the maid was a hooker and the women at the table was listing the prices for a spit roast and a bit of of the brown.

Going a little further back it has to be Michelangelo for me. Not just his paintings but the detail in his drawings is amazing.
 

smeg-head

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#63
Pick any one of these:
72683509cf43d42b1ad09ba7cabaa7cd--military-art-military-history.jpg

Terence Cuneo

David Shepherd - Men of the Woods.jpg

David Shepherd

04 1207569254_07_04_2008_0243067001207513522_bob_ross.jpg

Bob Ross

drow0014.jpg

David Rowlands - picture shows Cpl Mel Townsend earning his DCM in Dhofar.
 
#64
A artist i admire is Paul Stangroom a local Northumberland water colour artist.

Paul Stangroom
 
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#65
#66
Glasgow Art Gallery is really well worth a visit. You could spend a whole day.
As A boy I spent many happy days there. It was a place set up and designed for adults in which children were allowed to roam about freely. There was no concession about making it "child-friendly" or any other such nonsense. If you wanted to understand a bit more you had to read the detail and think about it. Gone a bit soft recently but there you are. The exhibits are still worth seeing.

The Dali caused a storm in the press when it was bought for £8,200 by Tom Honeyman. One of the more inspired decisions.

I'm of the same opinion as the Auld Yin; Carravagio seems to me to have been one of the most influential painters. Recently I read a History of European Art where the author denigrated C for his lifestyle; wild brawling, a fiery temper backed quickly with cold steel and alleged pederasty with his live-in model/assistant Cecco. Subsequently in the book the same author frequently cites C as a huge influence on European painting which indeed extends into the use of light and darkness in modern cinema.
 
#67
In Dublin's National Art gallery, every January, they host a display of many Turner works, because of the low light levels required not to damage the works, as some of them are very delicate so they show them with just a dim bulb illuminating each work. It's magic and always worth a visit.
 
#68
Ken Kelly.

Who he?, I hear you say. I chose him because of one painting that had a great influence on me as a teenager:

untitled.png


He's done loads of other stuff (some good, some bad, some indifferent IMHO) Maybe not everyone's cup of tea, but he gets the nod for the album cover alone.

http://www.kenkellyfantasyart.com/page/page/6626981.htm
 
#69
If you can include sculptures, Naples has the finest collections in Europe.......
apart from it's 3 Caravaggios, it has the Capella Sansevero.......

Cappella Sansevero in Naples

an astonishing place where you can almost touch the incredible art- works, all carved from single blocks of marble.

The only works you can compare them to is by Bernini.
 

Joshua Slocum

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#70
Rex Whistler
Sadly lost and lies buried in Fine Normandy soil
his range of art was wide and vivid everything from portraits to still life and drawings and comedy sketches




 

seaweed

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#71
Much brilliant work by Whistler in Mottisfont Abbey, Hants (NT). Another sad example of what we lost.
 

Auld-Yin

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#72
Rex Whistler
Sadly lost and lies buried in Fine Normandy soil
his range of art was wide and vivid everything from portraits to still life and drawings and comedy sketches




The detail in that portrait is superb, every railing in place, every leaf on show, yet it does not detract from the subject. My feeling though is it is so much like a photograph rather than a painting, technically fantastic but no real artistic element.

The bed layout would have had me jailed in Junior Bleeders if I laid out something so slovenly! :D
 
#75
I like Chris Foss's work:
chris foss.jpg
 
#76
I love just about all painters up to, say, the end of the 19th Century, but slightly more modern artists, here are a few of my faves:
Marc Chagall
Friedensreich Hundertwasser
Ernst Fuchs
Rudolf Hausner
Arik Brauer
Erich Heckel
Ernst-Ludwig Kirchner
Karl Schmitt-Rottluff
Max Pechstein
Franz Marc
Otto Mueller
Emil Nolde
Kees van Dongen.
Paul Wunderlich
Otto Beckman
Vassily Kandinski
Bernard Buffet
Lyonel Feininger
Piet Mondrian
August Macke
Hans am Ende
Otto Modersohn
Paula Moderson-Becker
Heinrich Vogeler
Fritz Mackensen
Le Ba Dang
Bruno Bruni
Käthe Kollwitz
Walter Womacka
Heidrun Hegewald
Rudolf Austen
Annemarie Bauer

Some of them are obviously known for their membership of various "artists' clubs", "Blaue Reiter, die Brücke, Wiener Schule, Worpswede Maler, etc, but they produce marvellous art.

MsG
care to give us a rundown of the Oldenburgische Schule.
 
#78
I like artwork around the house. Whenever we go on holiday anywhere we'll bring back either a few pieces by local artists or some prints of the locality. However in terms of favourtite artists/pictures I'll go with these

Tamara de Lempikca - The Sleeper. I've a full size framed print of this in the bedroom.
the-sleeper-tamara-de-lempicka-wikiartorg-1459689986_b.jpg


Edward Hopper - Nighthawks. I've a full sized print of this in the living room
hopper.jpg


the current mrs_mush buys me a signed Romain Hugault print every birthday. This one is in the kitchen
romain.jpg

And the one I want but the current mrs_mush has put her foot down is Gleyre's 'Romans passing under the yoke' to recognise their defeat by the Helvetians
romans.jpg


edit to add; Small piece of trivia. The word Subjugate comes from the latin Sub + Jugum. I.e. Under the yoke
 
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#79
Cuneo, Shepherd, Turner and the chap who painted this rather magnificent piece, William Bell-Scott.
It is a mural and is about 15ft square, and incredibly detailed.


7863239644_5bf0c4e82e_n.jpg
 
#80
Ken Kelly.

Who he?, I hear you say. I chose him because of one painting that had a great influence on me as a teenager:

View attachment 339584
He's done loads of other stuff (some good, some bad, some indifferent IMHO) Maybe not everyone's cup of tea, but he gets the nod for the album cover alone.

http://www.kenkellyfantasyart.com/page/page/6626981.htm
On a similar theme, I purchased loads of albums based on the striking quality of the cover art work. Roger Dean is a particular favourite of mine.
IMG_1831.JPG
 
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