Who is your favourite Artist/Painter

Auld-Yin

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#1
There are loads of who is your favourite threads so I thought I would start one on artists. This is brought about by a programme I was watching the other day about lost masterpieces, paintings that have disappeared, many during or abour WW2.

There are a huge number of artists and people will have their favourites which is the aim of this thread. Say who your fav is and why.

I have a lot of time for Monet and Toulouse-Lautrec and ceertainly like the works of Constable and of course that great English painter Turner.

However, my favouirite is a man who would probably fit right in here as an Arrsers. He lived quite a short life and produced some outstanding paintings in that period. He was a drunk, womaniser, murderer (well he killed a guy in a duel or while being attacked, stories vary), he blagged mopney where he could and spent a lot of it on prostitutes who he also used as models for the likes of the Virgin Mary.

The Man was Caravaggio, a man who knew how to use light to bring out the story of his pictures. Look him uop and see some of his great works.

Caravaggio 1.jpg
Caravaggio and Rubens - The Entombment of Christ.jpg

Caravaggio_-_David_con_la_testa_di_Golia.jpg


This one of David with Goliath's head is supposed to be a self portrait of Caravaggio where he was pleading to the Pope for a pardon, showing himself as repentant. On his way to see the Pope, where he believed he would get that pardon, he disapprared, completely. No sightings, no body, noone claiming to have killed him so his death remains a mystery. Killed by his enemies, died of natural causes and just buried - nobody knows. he went out as he lived, probably very violently. He had no qualms about bringing violence to his canvases.

This is my guy, who do you like most of all?
 
#2
I don’t think I have any one. Caravaggio has had a lot of publicity lately. I’m not a great fan of people like Picasso who I think is vastly overrated, but I think I get Impressionism. Quite like JMW Turners experiments with light and Brueghel is quite good in a brutalist sort of way.
 
#3
Mmm Caravaggio. Excellent choice.

I find it difficult to name a single artist, but Vermeer for his life images:


Dali, for surrealism:


Turner for impressionism:


Cuneo or Shepherd for railway paintings (Cueo for war too)

 
#5
William Hogarth. I love his series of paintings, The Rakes Progress, about the rise and fall of a well to do man in 18th century London.
The imagery is wonderful and so detailed.

59CE86F8-C53D-49D4-B8B3-8DBB7C93153B.jpeg
 

Sixty

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#7
Rogier van der Weyden or Robert Campin for me. I'm a sucker for early Flemish/Netherlandish art. Here are a couple of pics of their stuff taken by me at the Musées royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique.





When you consider that we're talking 15th century and predating the Dutch Golden Age by some margin, they're wonderful. Honourable mentions to Albrecht Durer, Jan van Eyck and the Bruegels. .
 
#8
Excellent subject... i know nothing so look forward to the education .
Ditto. It was always one of my regrets that I didn’t learn to draw or paint, I can happily spend hours wondering around galleries full of admiration for the talent on show.

MB
 
#11
I have two favourites, the loony Richard Dadd (1817-1886) murdered his dad with a razor and painted this (The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke, took him 9 years) whilst incarcerated in Bethlem loony bin:
the fairy fellers master stroke.jpg


and Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), his painting of Hell:
hell hieronymus bosch.jpg
 
#12
Agree with David shepherd, and Terrance Cuneo, not forgetting Don Brecton, all three capture the mystic and nostalgia of the days of steam. Military artists would have to be Ken Howard & Stuart Brown, they encapsulate the very essence of the British soldier, Ken Howard more so, in his Ex Crusader 80 sketch book, each page is a cameo of the real life of the tommy, the fine detail is exquisite.
 
#14
William Hogarth. I love his series of paintings, The Rakes Progress, about the rise and fall of a well to do man in 18th century London.
The imagery is wonderful and so detailed.

View attachment 339480
Have you seen the originals? In Sir John Soane’s house in London, fascinating detail and the story of the subject’s demise gives a scary insight into aspects of 18th century England. Excellent place for a visit, rich with a collection of artefacts
 

DaManBugs

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#16
I love just about all painters up to, say, the end of the 19th Century, but slightly more modern artists, here are a few of my faves:
Marc Chagall
Friedensreich Hundertwasser
Ernst Fuchs
Rudolf Hausner
Arik Brauer
Erich Heckel
Ernst-Ludwig Kirchner
Karl Schmitt-Rottluff
Max Pechstein
Franz Marc
Otto Mueller
Emil Nolde
Kees van Dongen.
Paul Wunderlich
Otto Beckman
Vassily Kandinski
Bernard Buffet
Lyonel Feininger
Piet Mondrian
August Macke
Hans am Ende
Otto Modersohn
Paula Moderson-Becker
Heinrich Vogeler
Fritz Mackensen
Le Ba Dang
Bruno Bruni
Käthe Kollwitz
Walter Womacka
Heidrun Hegewald
Rudolf Austen
Annemarie Bauer

Some of them are obviously known for their membership of various "artists' clubs", "Blaue Reiter, die Brücke, Wiener Schule, Worpswede Maler, etc, but they produce marvellous art.

MsG
 
#17
Have you seen the originals? In Sir John Soane’s house in London, fascinating detail and the story of the subject’s demise gives a scary insight into aspects of 18th century England. Excellent place for a visit, rich with a collection of artefacts
Yes, been there. It was part of a day of culture, which concluded with a tour of Fullers Brewery! :grin:
 
#18
Ansel Adams, as I'm a bit of an Ansel Adams walt in my spare time, and he provides a lot of inspiration

I just love the way he brought landscapes to life, a lot of artists look down on it but to me it's most definitely art

 
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#19
Rolf-

 
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