Who is the richest man on Arrse?

Maybe. But you'll also die too, and what then? You'll also be brown bread and no-one will give a flying fück about your alleged "success" in life. The thing is that you can only be a "success" in life, but not in death. Is that really something to crow about? Really? Think about that! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

MsG
I suppose there is a range of philosophical views, each equally valid where there is any degree of uncertainty. One of them is the one you espouse there; that it is all pointless as everyone is equally poor when dead. Another is that death is actually the end of everything, so you may as well have the best ride you can possibly get. What constitutes best is largely an individual thing so who's to say what is and isn't right or good. Once you add in the various religious views of life/after-life and even reincarnation, you have an imponderable range of outcomes with a bewildering array of routes to get there.

Personally, I like a lot of excitement, considerable amounts of novelty, sumptuous comfort or even luxury sometimes and have been fortunate enough to achieve those things. Early retirement is not so far off and, judging by my current health and genetics, it is likely that I will see 90 at least. My appetites have not waned and I am really looking forward to it. I think that death is the end and there are no dress rehearsals, so I may as well have as great a time as I can on the way there. Obviously I am going to pay as little tax as I possibly can in order to fund this lifestyle.

Who cares what people say, do or think once you are dead (Apart from your loved ones obvs)? You will be dead.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
What he said, and brought up 6 kids, and a now disabled wife, no holidays, no cars, eating out, no pubs, no smoking, no cinemas or any visits that cost money, and in 43 years of marriage i haven't owed a penny to anyone, now the kids have gone, mortgage paid and 4 pensions between us, and now, i don't look at prices, if i want it, i buy it,. The kids have all settled down with their family's and 4 own their own homes. all in work, and none in dept.

With A few bob in the bank and owe nothing to nobody. Hopefully another 20+ years on this blue green rock, and when we Kark it, the house sale money will be split 6 ways,..... everyone's a winner! ;):D:grin::boogie::dance::p
Alternative:

I chose to only have two kids. We have had some really memorable holidays, we eat out, go to the pub if we want to, go to the cinema if we feel like it, and take “road trips” to explore places of interest in the UK.

I could have forgone all of that to clear the mortgage quicker, had a smarter car or retired sooner but so what. The kids can always make money later in life, but you can’t go back in time to make memories.
 
Maybe. But you'll also die too, and what then? You'll also be brown bread and no-one will give a flying fück about your alleged "success" in life. The thing is that you can only be a "success" in life, but not in death. Is that really something to crow about? Really? Think about that! :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

MsG
Good job you're not bothered about being a failure, or you might be tempted to post about exactly just how much you're not bothered
You utter failure. When you die, it'll be like someone removing their hand from a bucket of water. It will leave no trace and nobody wiill notice, apart from the person living in the hovel below yours, who will eventually associate the stain on his ceiling and increasing smell over several weeks with your, hopefully comedic death.
 
Alternative:

I chose to only have two kids. We have had some really memorable holidays, we eat out, go to the pub if we want to, go to the cinema if we feel like it, and take “road trips” to explore places of interest in the UK.

I could have forgone all of that to clear the mortgage quicker, had a smarter car or retired sooner but so what. The kids can always make money later in life, but you can’t go back in time to make memories.
Our children were sent on all the school trips, one or two abroad, they never missed out on their normal childhood adventures, Saturday morning pictures, trips to the zoo etc it was my self and the wife that went without. Our first child was brought up in BAOR, with all that went with it, and as a PSI both accompanied me in Bavaria for a total of 8 months. In london they had the attractions and history of a 2000 year old city. Visited their relatives and had a happy rounded childhood.,

As for the two mortgages we held, the first was cleared in 4 years, the second, full term. We started in Army quarters, then a pre war council flat, then Victorian terraced, and now a 4 bed detached up here in semi rural south staffs. we keep in contact with all the children, and grandchildren , and see them all frequently, we get calls every week , and visit them when requested. several times a year all the family congregate back here in the ancestral pile, in total 22 of us, not bad for a semi educated east end boy,........ and girl. ;)
 
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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Alternative:

I chose to only have two kids. We have had some really memorable holidays, we eat out, go to the pub if we want to, go to the cinema if we feel like it, and take “road trips” to explore places of interest in the UK.

I could have forgone all of that to clear the mortgage quicker, had a smarter car or retired sooner but so what. The kids can always make money later in life, but you can’t go back in time to make memories.
It's balance, though.

I was married to someone who counted every penny - every penny.

Example: on one of the very, very rare occasions we ate out, I suggested we save money and buy pudding on the way home. We stopped at Sainsbury and because I chose the better-quality custard rather than the value alternative - a whole 40p more - she kicked off.

I used to wake up every day thinking, "Is this all there is to life?" It made me very ill in the end.

Now, SWMBO and I eat out, go out. We don't live ridiculously extravagantly but everything is paid off each month and if we fancy a treat we have one. But, modest cars, no big TVs or latest gadgets. The quality of life is in the things we do.

I agree with you; you can't get back the time spent on experiences.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Our children were sent on all the school trips, one or two abroad, they never missed out on their normal childhood adventures, Saturday morning pictures, trips to the zoo etc it was my self and the wife that went without. Our first child was brought up in BAOR, with all that went with it, and as a PSI both accompanied me in Bavaria for a total of 8 months. In london they had the attractions and history of a 2000 year old city. Visited their relatives and had a happy rounded childhood.,

As for the two mortgages we held, the first was cleared in 4 years, the second, full term. We started in Army quarters, then pre war council flat, then Victorian terraced, and now a 4 bed detached in its own grounds up here in semi rural south staffs. we keep in contact with all the children, and grandchildren , and see them all frequently, we get calls every week , and visit them when requested. several times a year all the family congregate back here in the ancestral pile, in total 22 of us, not bad for a semi educated east end boy,........ and girl. ;)
I am not saying right or wrong, and I am genuinely glad it worked out well for you.

I just can’t see the value in being hit by the metaphorical bus with money in the bank but nothing much left in the way of memories or experiences. Retirement with good health is far from certain, so why not enjoy it while I can?
 

Truxx

LE
I suppose there is a range of philosophical views, each equally valid where there is any degree of uncertainty. One of them is the one you espouse there; that it is all pointless as everyone is equally poor when dead. Another is that death is actually the end of everything, so you may as well have the best ride you can possibly get. What constitutes best is largely an individual thing so who's to say what is and isn't right or good. Once you add in the various religious views of life/after-life and even reincarnation, you have an imponderable range of outcomes with a bewildering array of routes to get there.

Personally, I like a lot of excitement, considerable amounts of novelty, sumptuous comfort or even luxury sometimes and have been fortunate enough to achieve those things. Early retirement is not so far off and, judging by my current health and genetics, it is likely that I will see 90 at least. My appetites have not waned and I am really looking forward to it. I think that death is the end and there are no dress rehearsals, so I may as well have as great a time as I can on the way there. Obviously I am going to pay as little tax as I possibly can in order to fund this lifestyle.

Who cares what people say, do or think once you are dead (Apart from your loved ones obvs)? You will be dead.
the one who dies with the most toys wins.
 
I am not saying right or wrong, and I am genuinely glad it worked out well for you.

I just can’t see the value in being hit by the metaphorical bus with money in the bank but nothing much left in the way of memories or experiences. Retirement with good health is far from certain, so why not enjoy it while I can?
We both have wonderful memories of 43 years together, bringing up the children, and as you can imagine, with such a large family, it was a stark choice, a council flat in a shitty part of london, and pissing it all up the wall knowing that the state and council will bail us out if it all went tits up, or taking the long term approach, knowing that eventually we would all be self sufficient, and in a good stable dept free environment.

Being one of 4 siblings brought up in post war london, father working all the hours to provide for us, and mother going out to work at the earliest opportunity, we were all taught a good work ethic, we were never denied all the trappings of childhood, even thought i knew both my parents were struggling. This mind-set i inherited, and so as stated up thread, we strived to give our family all the things that are expected of modern childhood. It was my wife and myself that went without, now we can sit back in the knowledge of a job well done. we have fulfilled our biological function, in spades.

The next generation will perpetuate that family trait, and hopefully it will filter down through the coming generations. We both consider ourselfs very fortunate, in that it could have on occasions gone so terribly wrong. Its all down to lifestyle choices, its that simple. :)
 
I am in a strange position these days
mil pension , civ service pension state pension and Doris has her pensions as well
nice detached house in a very nice ,( you can't really call the pace an estate) area with very decent neighbours .
Enough money to live well , but not rolling in it, basically , no wucking furries, got the car and the camper , holiday quite a lot sponsor my kids when they need a help out, drink wine two or three times a week , eat well
I can't take it with me
latest thing is wearing sandals , and shorts , letting my hair grow a bit these days (bucket list, never had longish hair Dad was ex army , then joined at 15 1/2 always had it neat and tidy) , now starting to look like a short porky Brian May, I didn't realise my hair was really curly, pisses off the wife and my son which is an added bonus although I did trim my fine beard a bit before we went to London last week

started picking up my guitars again , finding the left hand arthritis isn't as bad these days , finishing off most of the model planes I have started and semi abanddoned started flying off east lomond hill again

Generally , I am now only really concerned about me and the wife, don't really GAF what anyone else thinks , and am really in a good place (will probably fall of the perch soon , but we are all going to one day so don't worry about it)

Growing old disgracefully, not giving a sh1t, nearest thing to stress is tapping out my thoughts on this fine interweb thingy
 
I am in a strange position these days
mil pension , civ service pension state pension and Doris has her pensions as well
nice detached house in a very nice ,( you can't really call the pace an estate) area with very decent neighbours .
Enough money to live well , but not rolling in it, basically , no wucking furries, got the car and the camper , holiday quite a lot sponsor my kids when they need a help out, drink wine two or three times a week , eat well
I can't take it with me
latest thing is wearing sandals , and shorts , letting my hair grow a bit these days (bucket list, never had longish hair Dad was ex army , then joined at 15 1/2 always had it neat and tidy) , now starting to look like a short porky Brian May, I didn't realise my hair was really curly, pisses off the wife and my son which is an added bonus although I did trim my fine beard a bit before we went to London last week

started picking up my guitars again , finding the left hand arthritis isn't as bad these days , finishing off most of the model planes I have started and semi abanddoned started flying off east lomond hill again

Generally , I am now only really concerned about me and the wife, don't really GAF what anyone else thinks , and am really in a good place (will probably fall of the perch soon , but we are all going to one day so don't worry about it)

Growing old disgracefully, not giving a sh1t, nearest thing to stress is tapping out my thoughts on this fine interweb thingy
Fazackerly that!
 
the one who dies with the most toys wins.
I don't agree. I think the one who dies with least toys, having had plenty, wins. If you die with loads of toys, then you have seriously screwed up. The idea is to acquire asset streams and have exhausted them all by the point of your demise, having paid the minimum possible amount of tax.
 
I don't agree. I think the one who dies with least toys, having had plenty, wins. If you die with loads of toys, then you have seriously screwed up. The idea is to acquire asset streams and have exhausted them all by the point of your demise, having paid the minimum possible amount of tax.

Doesn't that depend on accurately predicting the date of one's demise?

If you die much earlier than the predicted date, you'd have had less fun while alive because you were predicting the assets to have been required longer.

If you die much later, you could find yourself in the poorhouse, having underestimated what was required.

And what about if one's wife/husband survives the other? For how long?

I don't really want to play that game.

Personally I'm wedded to work until my early 60s. On current predictions, I might be 63-65 when I can hang it up. My social security changes by about 100% if I retire at 59 (earliest possible) and 67. It's remarkably good, and the forecasts no longer include the rider "we might not have enough money to pay this", which they used to.
 
Doesn't that depend on accurately predicting the date of one's demise?

If you die much earlier than the predicted date, you'd have had less fun while alive because you were predicting the assets to have been required longer.

If you die much later, you could find yourself in the poorhouse, having underestimated what was required.

And what about if one's wife/husband survives the other? For how long?

I don't really want to play that game.

Personally I'm wedded to work until my early 60s. On current predictions, I might be 63-65 when I can hang it up. My social security changes by about 100% if I retire at 59 (earliest possible) and 67. It's remarkably good, and the forecasts no longer include the rider "we might not have enough money to pay this", which they used to.
It entirely relies on your ability to predict the exact date and nature of your own end. I have two financial forecasts running. One of them runs until I am 100 years old, while the other only runs until I am 90. In both cases I/we still own a house at the end. If I was any good at actuarial calculations, I'd be selling the lot at some point and living it up within the constraints of my physical and mental abilities.

My dad was in his mid-nineties when he passed away from kidney failure, which he developed as a soldier in the 8th Army. My mum is a very spritely 91. (They were old parents for the time). On that basis I still have quite while to go.

I now know, having had a couple of very thorough medicals recently, that all my bits are in good order and there are no indications of the onset of anything other than an Eosinophilic asthma, which is apparently curable.
 
You obviously do, you bullshitting cretin. Tell us again about being 'Down South' on Operation Corporate........ or not.
This bloke will tell you:

@Robme

Or not.
 
It entirely relies on your ability to predict the exact date and nature of your own end. I have two financial forecasts running. One of them runs until I am 100 years old, while the other only runs until I am 90. In both cases I/we still own a house at the end. If I was any good at actuarial calculations, I'd be selling the lot at some point and living it up within the constraints of my physical and mental abilities.

My dad was in his mid-nineties when he passed away from kidney failure, which he developed as a soldier in the 8th Army. My mum is a very spritely 91. (They were old parents for the time). On that basis I still have quite while to go.

I now know, having had a couple of very thorough medicals recently, that all my bits are in good order and there are no indications of the onset of anything other than an Eosinophilic asthma, which is apparently curable.
Both my parents are still alive at 95 and 90, on that basis if DNA is inherited, i still have about 24 or so years to go, apart from the usual older medical problems that are associated with "upper middle age" i still have all my faculty's, still able to use my hand and power tools about the house, and the kids houses when required, still useful and active. Being retired is a different mind-set, its a slower p[ace of life, also the knowledge gained in the previous years sets you up with the younger generation of the family, as the go to bloke., and not having to worry where the next meal is coming from, is a weight off the mind.

That takes forward planning, something that we both done back in 1981 when we returned to the UK. Unfortunately, some of today's generation of young newly weds, want the big house, car, bling and gadgets from day one, and eventually drop themselves in the mire a few years down the line. Then you have the the bank of mum and dad....................... and before you ask, no, none of our children have asked for help......YET! ;)
 
Both my parents are still alive at 95 and 90, on that basis if DNA is inherited, i still have about 24 or so years to go, apart from the usual older medical problems that are associated with "upper middle age" i still have all my faculty's, still able to use my hand and power tools about the house, and the kids houses when required, still useful and active. Being retired is a different mind-set, its a slower p[ace of life, also the knowledge gained in the previous years sets you up with the younger generation of the family, as the go to bloke., and not having to worry where the next meal is coming from, is a weight off the mind.

That takes forward planning, something that we both done back in 1981 when we returned to the UK. Unfortunately, some of today's generation of young newly weds, want the big house, car, bling and gadgets from day one, and eventually drop themselves in the mire a few years down the line. Then you have the the bank of mum and dad....................... and before you ask, no, none of our children have asked for help......YET! ;)


If you adopt me, I'll ask.
 

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