Who has had/having Laser Eye Surgery?

#1
What company / clinic / surgeon did you use and did it all go OK?

Considering getting this next year, I believe the LASEK treatment is now allowed as per Queens Regs. :?
 
#2
It's fooking brilliant! Very painful for 24 hours and theres a hell of a lot of eye medication for a couple of months but well worth it. I went with UltraLase in Manchester but they have clinics all over the place. I now have 6/6 vision which is one up from 20/20!
 
#3
I had it done with Ultralase (I think) in Birmingham. And I think it was Lasek.

I always said I would never get it done cos it was a vanity thing, but hated wearing glasses, having them steam up, get wet on ex, use respirators etc etc! A mate had it done and convinced me.

It cost me about £1200 4-5 yrs ago (much cheaper now) and it will scare the shit out of you having a laser pointed in your eye and sounding like a jackhammer; it really is that loud. At the back of your mind will be what if it all goes wrong and the clinic hammered it home that very, very occasionally it does go wrong.

I was told it would take about 5 days for my eyes to settle down afterwards. Try more like a month of blurred vision and panicking it had gone wrong! The first week you have to tape perspex shields to your eyes at night so you don't rub them in your sleep. I woke up several times in a lot of pain as healing cells stuck to the eyelid and were pulled off during REM sleep-it hurts! This still happens occasionally as I'm blue-eyed and fair skinned and am prone to dry eyes. They will warn you not to do it if you have severe dry eye.

Anyway, I'm trying to show you the pitfalls as I see them. I'm lucky during the healing period I had my guinea-pig mate to reassure me. The main thing is its the best £1200 I have ever spent! And yes I would recommend it.

To do it whilst serving you are supposed to get permission! It's quite straightforward now but I think they put a deployment ban on you for 12 months.
 
#5
Dontdreamit said:
Ultralase eh? Thanks for the feedback guys
Yeah mate, can't give them enough praise. As Northern Monkey said be prepared and make sure you understand the pros and cons as the surgery ISN'T guaranteed!

I'm not sure on the price coming down at UltraLase, it cost me £3000 around 18 months ago! Having said that I'd pay it again without question.

LASEK is the way forward as LASIK is still not allowed. It takes longer for the eyes to heal with LASEK but thats the only difference in the surgery (apart from the way they create the flap in the lens).

All in all mate I think you'll find it well worth while.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
a friend of mine has a brother who is a consultant surgeon at a very well known institution (his wife is one also). spoke to him about this a while back - he, his wife, and none of his colleagues will touch it with a bargepole - nor will any of them let their kids have it. make of that what you will.
 
#7
had mine done at Accuvision Solihull. £1000 per eye. I have had no problems with it, but would make this point. Depending on your vision, you may have to compromise. To explain, I had short-sightedness, but was finding reading getting a bit difficult too. So the surgeon explained to me that he could improve my distance vision to almost perfect. However, the downside was that I would probably have to wear glasses for reading. Alternatively, he explained that he could improve my distance vision to very good but not perfect, but the payoff was that I wouldn't need glasses for reading. I chose the latter option, which in retrospect I was glad about. What annoyed me though was that this option was given to me just before the procedure! So what I would say is, make sure you know EXACTLY what the options are before you go ahead.

All in all, it was the best move I have ever made. I would definitely recomend it. Just be sure you know what you want. As I remember there are two procedures. LASEK and LASIK as I recall. I think one involved cutting a flap of skin from the cornea before the laser treatment, the other does not require the cutting, so I would guess it is inherently less risky. That said I went for the cutting option and had no problems (considerably cheaper too) A chap I was at the surgery with was ack for a second try after technical difficulties the first time. He required corrective surgery, as far as I am aware it was corrected with no further problems. lthough the vast majority of procedures are troule free, like any surgery, problems can and do occur.

Hope I haven't frightened you off!!
 
#8
maguire said:
a friend of mine has a brother who is a consultant surgeon at a very well known institution (his wife is one also). spoke to him about this a while back - he, his wife, and none of his colleagues will touch it with a bargepole - nor will any of them let their kids have it. make of that what you will.
Interesting.....however the surgeon who performed my operation had the procedure himself and so had 2 of his assistants, and the fact that the surgery comes with a lifetime guarantee (i.e. your eyes feck up and we'll zapp 'em again) sealed the deal for me.
 

acl

Old-Salt
#9
maguire said:
a friend of mine has a brother who is a consultant surgeon at a very well known institution (his wife is one also). spoke to him about this a while back - he, his wife, and none of his colleagues will touch it with a bargepole - nor will any of them let their kids have it. make of that what you will.
It's no surprise most doctors would ONLY ever have any type of surgery in extreme circumstances. My doctor performed my surgery and after 2 months my vision has settled to almost perfection, yet he still wears glasses and wouldn't have it done himself. Wimp.

Dontdreamit : do your homework about the surgery, prices and which method you think will suit you best. Work out the pros and cons at your end but in my experience and from another fellow arrser who also had it done recently, it's wonderful and it will change your life.

I would have it done again without thinking it twice.
 
#10
Just to add; my eyes were absolutely fine after 2 days. Just goes to show different procedures, different people, different prescriptions etc proves that what's good for one isn't necessarily good for another. Still well worth considering though.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
JimmyNeutron said:
the fact that the surgery comes with a lifetime guarantee (i.e. your eyes feck up and we'll zapp 'em again) sealed the deal for me.
that would be a huge comfort to me if I went blind in twenty years time. the fact is, the long term numbers on this simply dont exist yet - I'd be interested to hear exactly how they can guarantee this.
 
#12
Hi,
My Dad had PRK a while back and says it's brilliant(perfect vision that is not PRK).
Was just wondering, do they advise a minimum age to have laser eye...e.g. 21? or is it each case on it's own merits?
 
#13
maguire said:
JimmyNeutron said:
the fact that the surgery comes with a lifetime guarantee (i.e. your eyes feck up and we'll zapp 'em again) sealed the deal for me.
that would be a huge comfort to me if I went blind in twenty years time. the fact is, the long term numbers on this simply dont exist yet - I'd be interested to hear exactly how they can guarantee this.
Fair one, was actually more of a throw away comment really. I don't think the guarantee is that youre eyes will be perfect forever, more along the lines that your eyes shape and therefore vision can change for a number of factors; head impact for example and if that ever should happen you can have the surgery again FOC. I understand that the long term numbers dont exist yet but thats part of the decision making process, besides its only a bit of scar tissue in the back of your eye!
 
#14
Spanglish said:
Hi,
My Dad had PRK a while back and says it's brilliant(perfect vision that is not PRK).
Was just wondering, do they advise a minimum age to have laser eye...e.g. 21? or is it each case on it's own merits?
It's usually 18+ with a steady level of vision for 12 - 18 months.
 
#16
Trust me, the clinic will scare the hell out of you without any research. Any surgery is dangerous and on that basis none of us would have what is in effect cosmetic surgery! You weigh up the odds and make a choice. It worked for me.
 
#17
Northern Monkey said:
Trust me, the clinic will scare the hell out of you without any research. Any surgery is dangerous and on that basis none of us would have what is in effect cosmetic surgery! You weigh up the odds and make a choice. It worked for me.
What he said.
 
#18
I had LASIK 2 weeks ago, apart from a bit of discomfort for a few hours after I have been fine, sleeping in goggles for a week was a little mad! As for the light show when the proceedure is underway must be like being on drugs!

Last week the consultant said all was good, and I could, if I need, head off to sandy climes by January.

Downside so far has been reading glasses but they do give you that superior air as your peer over the top at the minions!
 
#19
JimmyNeutron said:
Mistakes? Any examples?
Typically the most serious include excessive thinning of the cornea from the laser possibly resulting in Keratoconus (corneal ectasia / protrusion), deterioration to the point where you may require corneal transplants (that your body may also reject).

That's typically worse case scenario. What you probably will experience is dry eyes / "sands of the Sahara", loss of night vision / contrast clarity & night time glares / halos. Might be temporary, might be permanent. You might also experience flap "wrinkling", scarring or partial dislocation that will impact visual acuity that cannot be corrected with artificial lenses.

I had LASIK 22 months ago myself (Wavefront Ultralase, Optical Express). Personally I'd push for LASEK if your prescription allows it.

The army now "allows" LASIK, LASEK, PRK & ICRS / ICSS, but not RK or AK.
 
#20
Hypothetically...

If you where to have this surgery without letting your chain of command or MO know, what would be the consequences if discovered on a medical?
 

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