Who Donates to Charity?

#1
Tax scandal threatens charity donations - Tax - Money - The Independent

The Charity Commission’s handling of a high-profile tax-avoidance scandal that saw shockingly little donated money reach good causes has put charities at risk of losing the public’s confidence – and consequently their money, one of the leading figures in the sector has warned
The Cup Trust was exposed in January as giving only £55,000 to good causes despite raising £176m over two years as part of a scheme in which donors were suspected of claiming millions in tax relief through an abuse of the Gift Aid scheme. But after a 24-month investigation, the Charity Commission, chaired by William Shawcross, allowed the Cup Trust to remain on the charity register.
Children Charities: Salaries of the Executives

Did you know that some Children Charity CEOs earn nearly $0.5 million per year?
I've looked at the accounts of a few charities in the last year and:

1) a good portion of the money people give seem to go on salaries and pensions with some people taking home BIG salaries
2) A lot of government funded institutions, like colleges for example, seem to be 'charities'
3) I came to the conclusion charities are businesses funded by mugs and the tax payers.


Apart from the RBL poppy appeal I don't give much any more.
 
B

benjaminw1

Guest
#2
I work on the 90% principle; look at the annual accounts and no more than 10% can be spent on non direct charitable work/giving (this includes advertising, HQ costs &c. as well as salaries).
 
#3
I give to the RBL and the local dogs' rescue which includes taking on Silvie, my three-legged, one-eyed Labrador and who is an absolute sweetie. As for all the others, charity begins at home unless in exceptional circumstances.

OZ
 
#4
http://disability-studies.leeds.ac.uk/files/library/Clark-Laurence-leonard-cheshire.pdf

PR Budget of £4 million per year. £1300 per week fees paid from benefits system per inmate. 80% of homes unfit for purpose.

And charities like "inquest" ? Charity registration to operate in England and Wales within Inquest Law. So what were they doing helping out Mickey Mansfield's British Irish Rights Watch Charity in the Farrell Savage McCann case in ECHR ?

UKIP has its eyes on Charity Commission and a potential forty billion a year saving to public funds.
 
R

renamed_user

Guest
#5
I donate £100 per year to the Army Benevolent Fund, but they send me lots of mail shots throughout the year asking for more, fair enough. My issue is these mail shots are costing money so how much of my wedge is actually going to the veterans?
 
#6
DD donations to Age UK, Diabetes UK, RBL and the Salvation Army, plus ad hoc donations to others. I am seriously considering kicking them all into touch - except the Sally Ann ? Why, because I get a steady flow of junk mail and phone calls from the others asking for even more and in the case of the RBL, raffle tickets, the 'something anniversary' of 'something' special appeal, 'dedicate this cross', etc. - probably two or more a month. Some or all of them have obviously sold my details on to other charities (like scam artists do) and there is quite honestly not a post that doesn't have one or more begging letters. The other day I got an A4 enveloped from the Red Cross (postage now by size of course) full of unwanted and un-asked-for 'blackmail' goodies like note cards, address stickers, bookmarks and crap biros. I will not donate to animal charities, to anything to do with India (if they can afford the standing army that Earth thinks so awesome and a nuclear deterrent they can afford to feed their people) or Africa where I am sure most of the cash goes into the dictator's Swiss bank account. I shall just put more into the tins of the truly deserving.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#7
I'd advise anyone to search charities on the commissions websites before donating. McMillan were desperate last week for my money to provide servies but it appeared they'd about £100m in the bank I seem to recall.
 
#8
The OH could sit through a full-on horromentary showing starving fly blown third world kids sitting in a pool of their own piss and her conscience wouldn't even flicker. But show her still pic of donkey with a wonky leg and she's reaching for her purse.

Funny world.
 
#9
RBL, RNLI and a charity called YouthNet by direct debit.
ABF from my pay.
Various ad hoc donations to charities if a friend is doing a sponsored event or something.
 
#10
The OH could sit through a full-on horromentary showing starving fly blown third world kids sitting in a pool of their own piss and her conscience wouldn't even flicker. But show her still pic of donkey with a wonky leg and she's reaching for her purse.

Funny world.
Just £2.00 a Month to save this Donkey... Won't you give £2.00 to allow Dobbin to live the rest of his life in peace....

PR it's manipulation and how to rock the conscience of the public is now a well mastered art.....

collapseddonkey.jpg

There are a few good tubs of glue in that nag......
 
#11
I don't donate as a rule; I prefer to give up my time as a volunteer instead. No room for corruption, I can see the positive impact I am having, and I feel smugly superior as a result. Beers all round.
 
#12
skintboymike said:
I don't donate as a rule; I prefer to give up my time as a volunteer instead. No room for corruption, I can see the positive impact I am having, and I feel smugly superior as a result. Beers all round.
With my charity donations, they're usually quite a low amount and like yourself I place more of a focus on volunteering. Nothing like a bit of smug superiority.
 
#13
I'd advise anyone to search charities on the commissions websites before donating. McMillan were desperate last week for my money to provide servies but it appeared they'd about £100m in the bank I seem to recall.
There is a curious 'x'-factor to such a situation as this. Many of the higher profile charity organisations have been bequeathed property from a collections of wills. Invariably, the property comes with strings attached, such as renting the amenity out with the proceeds goings into the collection box ( in a manner of phrase)
These organisations soon found themselves bound by statutory landlord's regulations of having to finance surveys for asbestos and the like and the general upkeep of the structure with associated staff costs to administrate the portfolio.

On paper they 'look' very rich, however the day to day financial running costs reality is another picture again.
 
#15
I donate £100 per year to the Army Benevolent Fund, but they send me lots of mail shots throughout the year asking for more, fair enough. My issue is these mail shots are costing money so how much of my wedge is actually going to the veterans?
Last year 51%. Which seems to be a lot less than other charities I looked at.

They spent £8.83m to donate £9.22m.

Charity overview



This one interested me. Soldier On!
Over 2 years have accrued £95,842 but have only spent £1,030 in that time. No employess and no one is paid. So why have it if you're not using it?

Charity overview
 
#16
It's a thorny issue for me too. We contacted the national charity for my OH's disability to ask for assistance with getting a new electric wheelchair (which is their main stated aim seeing as how the NHS can't provide suitable chairs). In theory they act as a middle-man dealing with charitable wheelchair grant bodies (who themselves refuse to deal with individuals - only other charities).Three years later and no wheelchair. We asked for advice on house adaptations to be told 'Sorry we can't help with those matters'. Asked what they can help with and 'errm, childrens wheelchairs and support'. Hmm.

So we had a look at their accounts to find 70% of income spent on salaries/admin, most of the rest on HQ costs and ~10% on their actual stated aim (although all of that was income from other charitable grant bodies pass-the-parcel style).

The CEO alone takes over 10% of the entire income as basic salary.

Charity? Bah.
 
#17
The OH could sit through a full-on horromentary showing starving fly blown third world kids sitting in a pool of their own piss and her conscience wouldn't even flicker. But show her still pic of donkey with a wonky leg and she's reaching for her purse.

Funny world.

Been studies into this and back in the 80's that kind of footage shocked the world now it's so common people have de-sensitised to it I personally dont donate anything to oversea's charities due to corruption and mis-spening aid money on Merc instead of tractors.

I do however support the dogs trust by donating stuff to the charity shop and the odd pocket coinage in animal welfare/mountian rescue tins. I'll also put dog food into the collection bins at Morrisons if I remember.
 
#18
Been studies into this and back in the 80's that kind of footage shocked the world now it's so common people have de-sensitised to it I personally dont donate anything to oversea's charities due to corruption and mis-spening aid money on Merc instead of tractors.

I do however support the dogs trust by donating stuff to the charity shop and the odd pocket coinage in animal welfare/mountian rescue tins. I'll also put dog food into the collection bins at Morrisons if I remember.
The Dogs Trust, a nice little earner if you can get it

dogs.JPG

http://www.charity-commission.gov.uk/Accounts/Ends23/0000227523_ac_20111231_e_c.pdf
 
#19
Salvos get a quid, my uncle told about being up to his arms in mud and shit in New Guinea ( on the front line), and up comes some skinny old **** passing him a lit tab and a cuppa. From what I've heard it wasn't an uncommon experience. Legacy tried to get the m in l a war widows pension after the f in l rolled a seven, knocked back and they offered to appeal. Mrs Filthy and I had a confab and told them that everything was all good financially and there were a lot more people a lot worse off that could do with a hand. I've never forgotten them and always kick the tin. Every other charity can get****ed though.
 

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