Who does not know what D day was?

Churchill once remarked that " The biggest cross I have to bare, is the cross of Loraine"
Lorraine:
Lion of Britain, Cross of Lorraine: Churchill and de Gaulle - The International Churchill Society
It was General Spears, not Churchill, who remarked, “the hardest cross I have to bear is the Cross of Lorraine,” though WSC certainly shared those sentiments. So why did he not abandon de Gaulle after so many provocations? The answer is in Churchill’s own words. In France’s darkest hour Churchill had whispered to him, “L’homme du destin.”32
 
That man was an utter buffoon & liability as well as an outright shit bag.

His lot demanded that the Jeburgh & SAS teams who had been coordinating & helping the Maquis for along time be withdrawn from french soil asap after their group operational areas had been liberated so as to give the impression that the resistance was french born & bred. Was it fcuk. Most of them were pretty happy to play hand in glove with the germans, esp when it came to their own efforts to sort out the Jews - most anti Jewish legislation wasn't imposed by the germans at all.
Also insisted that French 2nd Armoured Div were first into Paris. Yes,they saw hard action but liberate Paris they did not.
And the various resistance groups spent as much time fighting each other as the Germans.
 
Also insisted that French 2nd Armoured Div were first into Paris. Yes,they saw hard action but liberate Paris they did not.
And the various resistance groups spent as much time fighting each other as the Germans.
Titter ye not, but the RAF Regt claim to have been first into Paris...

De Gaulle's piece de resistance, if you'll pardon the pun, was surely his threat to inflict a French railway strike on the Allies unless they allowed Free French forces to liberate Strassbourg (by that time the French railways were being reconstructed and used to move supplies forward from Normandy and southern France).
 
Wellington...........every....sort it out old chap, us old blokes have a hard enough time
reading some of the wibble posted, not made any easier by bad syntax and spelling.

Late edit to add:- No 1 london, Apsley house, Home of Arthur Wellesley, the first Duke of Wellington, his descendants still live there, and is open to the public.
And is the reason he became widely known as the 'Iron Duke'; because of the iron shutters he had installed at Apsley House in 1832 to deter stone-throwing rioters following his term as Tory PM.
 
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And is the reason he became widely known as the 'Iron Duke'; because of the iron shutters he had installed at Apsley House to deter stone-throwing rioters following his term as Tory PM.

I was under the impression it was beacause of his robust approach to warfare, his strict regime of drill dress and discipline within the ranks,, and his total command of the changing state of play on the battlefield.
 
Titter ye not, but the RAF Regt claim to have been first into Paris...

De Gaulle's piece de resistance, if you'll pardon the pun, was surely his threat to inflict a French railway strike on the Allies unless they allowed Free French forces to liberate Strassbourg (by that time the French railways were being reconstructed and used to move supplies forward from Normandy and southern France).
The RAF Reg? I didn't know EFI had a Paris branch...
 
Wasn't de Gaulle also responsible for continued failures in Indo-China and laid the way for the US involvement in Vietnam due to blackmailing Washington to support Frances claims?
 
At the planning HQ for Overlord,saluting was banned. Apparently de Gaulle was the only senior officer who insisted on being saluted.
And he stopped Britain joining the Common Market. Twice.
Currently reading "1100 Miles With Monty: Security and Intelligence at TAC HQ" by Norman Kirby. The author was an Intelligence Corps Sergeant responsible for the external security or Montgomery's HQ. Page 37, de Gaulle tries to enter TAC without ID. Eventually he shows his ID and is allowed in. de Gaulle then complains to Monty, who told him to "Stop belly-aching. Those men have a job to do".

Apparently Churchill and Eisenhower also had to show ID. Eisenhower put his hand on the authors shoulder, handed over his wallet and said "Help yourself son." Its a good job the author wasn't a Scouser.
 
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I was under the impression it was beacause of his robust approach to warfare, his strict regime of drill dress and discipline within the ranks,, and his total command of the changing state of play on the battlefield.
No Just shouting!

 

LepetitCaporal

Old-Salt
The débarquement en Province, ring a bell?
Shortly after Monté Cassino (15 August 44)
Operation Anvil Dragoon
Hardly ever mentioned but just as important as Normandie
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
The débarquement en Province, ring a bell?
Shortly after Monté Cassino (15 August 44)
Operation Anvil Dragoon
Hardly ever mentioned but just as important as Normandie
Ah yes, where the French fought side by side with Ze Germans to try and throw back the other French who had their Allied mates with them, that one?
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Ah yes, where the French fought side by side with Ze Germans to try and throw back the other French who had their Allied mates with them, that one?
Don't forget the contribution of the Italians who weren't sure who to fight so ended up going home!
 

ches

LE
Currently reading "1100 Miles With Monty: Security and Intelligence at TAC HQ" by Norman Kirby. The author was an Intelligence Corps Sergeant responsible for the external security or Montgomery's HQ. Page 37, de Gaulle tries to enter TAC without ID. Eventually he shows his ID and is allowed in. de Gaulle then complains to Monty, who told him to "Stop belly-aching. Those men have a job to do".

Apparently Churchill and Eisenhower also had to show ID. Eisenhower put his hand on the authors shoulder, handed over his wallet and said "Help yourself soon." Its a good job the author wasn't a Scouser.
Still got a very old copy of that in the loft.
 
I was under the impression it was beacause of his robust approach to warfare, his strict regime of drill dress and discipline within the ranks,, and his total command of the changing state of play on the battlefield.
That's what I used to believe, but it was definitely coined by the press in response to the iron shutters on Apsley House.
 
The débarquement en Province, ring a bell?
Shortly after Monté Cassino (15 August 44)
Operation Anvil Dragoon
Hardly ever mentioned but just as important as Normandie
I agree that it's hardly ever mentioned, though while important it was hardly 'as important as Normandy'. The south of France was absolutely drained of reserve formations thanks to Normandy and only one reserve formation was left (the 11th Panzer Division, which was in the process of re-forming and was badly lacking in panzers and motor transport). After the departure of 2nd SS Panzer Corps for Normandy in June, the forces in the south were not capable of taking offensive action, so were no threat to the main operation in Normandy, so Operation Dragoon was largely possible because Normandy had already taken place and had drawn off 2nd SS Panzer Corps and a number of infantry divisions.

The 'landings' were also primarily undertaken by US forces, plus the British 2nd Parachute Brigade. The only Free French element in the initial landing was a single battalion of Commandos. De Lattre's army came ashore once the bridgehead had been established.
 

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