Who does not know what D day was?

#1
What were the D-Day landings?

Should I be surprised at the need for an explanation of what the D day landings were? I would have assumed that most of the people who read the BBC website would have a good idea what happened 75 years ago.

I find it odd that people apparently do not know. I would imagine that all of us on here have a very good idea of what occurred and why, but is this due to our ages and experiences? I would guess that most of us knew someone who took part or who remembered it happening and as a result we have a personal link to the event and all that surrounded it.

Have events such as this now passed so far into history that they have become irrelevant and uninteresting to most people under the age of 30?
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
#2
Plenty. If think that young soldiers today were born in 2001!
 
#3
Have events such as this now passed so far into history that they have become irrelevant and uninteresting to most people under the age of 30?
Grandkids get taught it at school, first war as well.
 
#4
Much moonhowling from the anti-Trumpists who are more-or-less saying that he is only in UK to take advantage of the political mayhem, and put his oar in re Brexit.
Nothing to do with the 75th, then...
 
#5
Only the 1st couple of paragraphs are "what D-day was" the rest goes into more details that, if you're not a member of the UK's premier military themed chat forum or similiar military geek, you might not know (eg which nations were responsible for which beach.

What would you be saying if the BBC didn't have a "D-day for dummies" page?
 
#6
Much moonhowling from the anti-Trumpists who are more-or-less saying that he is only in UK to take advantage of the political mayhem, and put his oar in re Brexit.
Nothing to do with the 75th, then...
People over here don't realise how much of a big thing it still is in the US. Any American visiting Europe will include a visit to Utah/Omaha beaches (plus St Mere Eglise if granddad was in the airborne); a right of passage if you like.
 
#7
Monday 15th February 1971 - Decimal Day. I was there!
Joking aside. I suspect many, many more people will know about 6th June 1944 than the end of £sd.
 
#9
Only the 1st couple of paragraphs are "what D-day was" the rest goes into more details that, if you're not a member of the UK's premier military themed chat forum or similiar military geek, you might not know (eg which nations were responsible for which beach.

What would you be saying if the BBC didn't have a "D-day for dummies" page?
I do understand that the headline of the article is slightly off with regards to the content and a reminder of the details is good to see.

To be honest, I probably would not have noticed if they had not included a D-day for dummies.
 
#10
I read somewhere recently, that when asked who we fought in WW2, a lot of today's kids hadn't a clue. One of my wife's grandkids has never even heard of DDay.
 
#12
At the risk of being called a "right wing, racist Nazi, Trump loving fascist" Some of the newer members of the UK may not be so aware of the history of D Day or even WWII.
As has been said, there would be a wailing and gnashing of teeth if the BBC had not covered the commemorations.
 
#13
What were the D-Day landings?

Should I be surprised at the need for an explanation of what the D day landings were? I would have assumed that most of the people who read the BBC website would have a good idea what happened 75 years ago.

I find it odd that people apparently do not know. I would imagine that all of us on here have a very good idea of what occurred and why, but is this due to our ages and experiences? I would guess that most of us knew someone who took part or who remembered it happening and as a result we have a personal link to the event and all that surrounded it.

Have events such as this now passed so far into history that they have become irrelevant and uninteresting to most people under the age of 30?
The English Civil War was a major party of our history. Our bloodiest war, formed the army, changed the monarchy. How many today know much about it?
 
#14
The English Civil War was a major party of our history. Our bloodiest war, formed the army, changed the monarchy. How many today know much about it?
Yes but that was centuries ago - even before the Act of Union. By contrast, World War Two was less than a lifetime ago.

I do find it odd that that war as a shared national experience and point of historical reference has been downplayed? Is this something to do with post colonial guilt? This would be odd as it marked the end of European empires.
 
#15
What were the D-Day landings?

Should I be surprised at the need for an explanation of what the D day landings were? I would have assumed that most of the people who read the BBC website would have a good idea what happened 75 years ago.

I find it odd that people apparently do not know. I would imagine that all of us on here have a very good idea of what occurred and why, but is this due to our ages and experiences? I would guess that most of us knew someone who took part or who remembered it happening and as a result we have a personal link to the event and all that surrounded it.

Have events such as this now passed so far into history that they have become irrelevant and uninteresting to most people under the age of 30?
The BBC is a global broadcaster and not every country was involved in Overlord, let alone its remembrance 75 years after the fact.

Inform, educate and entertain.
 
#16
I would imagine many social media obsessed youngsters of 18 and below don't know much about it beyond maybe the Call of Duty games (aside from youngsters of that age who are serving and therefore taught it). Even Saving Private Ryan and Band of Brothers which inspired a lot of interest and education on D.Day and WW2 in general for my generation when we were teenagers are two decades old now.
 
#17
Anti-Trump whingers. Who haven't figured out that the orange one is here in his capacity as the President of the United States of America, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the landings at Normandy.
 
#19
I would imagine many social media obsessed youngsters of 18 and below don't know much about it beyond maybe the Call of Duty games (aside from youngsters of that age who are serving and therefore taught it). Even Saving Private Ryan and Band of Brothers which inspired a lot of interest and education on D.Day and WW2 in general for my generation when we were teenagers are two decades old now.
Bloody hell, that's a sobering thought and I must watch BoB again.

Interestingly, I have the box set in the metal container and it is signed by one 'Wild Bill' Guanere whom I met at Aldbourne in 2007, along with 'Babe' Heffron. They were both awesome individuals.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top