Who do i call Sir?

#1
About to start work as a Civilian within a TA Unit from what rank do i call people Sir?
The head of Quartermasters section is i think a SNCO promoted to a Captain who is likely to be my line manager.
Do i call him Sir or just Captain + surname.
The Major who is the Company OC do i call them Sir or Mam?
Or do all Officers & SNCO's get to be called sir?
 
#3
Call him Q.
He will let you know how he wishes to be addressed. Ask him politely, you won't go to jail.
:D
 
#4
fltpilot said:
About to start work as a Civilian within a TA Unit from what rank do i call people Sir?
The head of Quartermasters section is i think a SNCO promoted to a Captain who is likely to be my line manager.
Do i call him Sir or just Captain + surname.
The Major who is the Company OC do i call them Sir or Mam?
Or do all Officers & SNCO's get to be called sir?
If the OC is a bloke, I doubt if he d appreciate being called Ma'am.

Joking aside, I doubt very much if you ll be expected to use rank at all As previous poster says, try asking how they d like to be addressed??
 
#11
mwl946 said:
fltpilot said:
About to start work as a Civilian within a TA Unit from what rank do i call people Sir?
The head of Quartermasters section is i think a SNCO promoted to a Captain who is likely to be my line manager.
Do i call him Sir or just Captain + surname.
The Major who is the Company OC do i call them Sir or Mam?
Or do all Officers & SNCO's get to be called sir?
If the OC is a bloke, I doubt if he d appreciate being called Ma'am.
Only at weekends :wink: :wink: :wink:
 
#13
If you come down here, just call him mate. You can cheerfully call the Prime Minister by her/his first name. No one gives a toss.
 
#14
On on embed with the British or American military I basically assume the role of 'gentleman corporal' and called everyone by their rank, up to captain and then it's sir. For one particular US Lt it was SAH! with a sarcastic rigid Windsor Davies salute.
 
#15
Whatever you call them, always bear in mind the legendary - probably apocryphal - Day One instruction given by the ASM to would-be ossifers:

"Gentlemen, during your time at Sandhurst, I shall address you as 'Sir' and you will address me as 'Sir.' The difference is that you will mean it."
 
#17
SNLR86 said:
Whatever you call them, always bear in mind the legendary - probably apocryphal - Day One instruction given by the ASM to would-be ossifers:

"Gentlemen, during your time at Sandhurst, I shall address you as 'Sir' and you will address me as 'Sir.' The difference is that you will mean it."
Think those days have long gone now. I was never called sir.
 
#18
I find being called "Boss" deeply cack. In my opinion it is waltishness of the worst kind, inviting respectable green Army officers to collude in their soldiery's fantasies of SF-dom.

The word "Sir" is quite sufficiently neutral to be used as a title (Sarn't Major, march in the guilty bastard and his three lying friends! Sir!), with affection (Alright sirs? Yes thank you Staff - now about those female cadets...) or even with contempt (Howay Sir, man!)...

Many years ago I was invited to take part in a pick-up game of footie. well actually I asked please could i play. The lads asked what was my name. I replied "Sir will do nicely!" Yes it could have come across as a bit of a cheeser but after half an hour some of my lads turned up and called for the ball with "Sir! Over here!" or "Adj! Adj sir!" So it was all about context.

I have never felt the need to be matey-matey on first name terms with my soldiers. Nick-names are one thing I'll grant you. However if you know where you all stand then there is no problem. Which is at attention, two and a half pace steps from my desk. Stand at ease. Stand easy. Take a seat, how's the wife?

:lol: :wink:
 
#19
BeastAppreciationSociety. said:
SNLR86 said:
Whatever you call them, always bear in mind the legendary - probably apocryphal - Day One instruction given by the ASM to would-be ossifers:

"Gentlemen, during your time at Sandhurst, I shall address you as 'Sir' and you will address me as 'Sir.' The difference is that you will mean it."
Think those days have long gone now. I was never called sir.


O tempora, o mores...
 
#20
Cuddles said:
I find being called "Boss" deeply cack. In my opinion it is waltishness of the worst kind, inviting respectable green Army officers to collude in their soldiery's fantasies of SF-dom.
In my battalion the term 'Boss' is universally applied by the lads to their platoon commanders, even in the third term i.e. "The boss wants us there by 0900hrs."

I had no idea that it was viewed as a uniquely Special Forces thing.
 

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