Who decides what's news? Lord Lieutenant resigns after criticising Pakistani Community

#1
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-34228047

A Lord Lieutenant expresses (in a calm manner imo) a view that some members of our Pakistani Community do not integrate and are sometimes not civil to others. The e-mail in which the comments are made is leaked to the Guardian and the Lord Lieutenant resigns, probably to seek to avoid bringing HM into (edit: what the Guardian would build into) a controversial discussion.
This story reminded me of the Simon Weston/Guardian journalist story. Why is this story more news-worthy than that? Who decides to focus on certain stories and to disregard others?
(I'm fresh from listening to a BBC journalist offering personal criticism of the Hungarian govt re. refugees rather than reporting facts).
Any views?
 
Last edited:
#2
I don't even really understand why he felt he had to resign; he didn't say anything particularly contentious, particularly as he hails from an ethnic community himself.
 
#3
Indian-born Paul Sabapathy CBE said Pakistanis needed to be taught "basic common courtesy and civility".

He has apologised "unreservedly and wholeheartedly" for the comments.

The Guardian reported Mr Sabapathy's email said: "Pakistanis are lovely people individually but there is a lot of work to do to teach them basic common courtesy and civility.

"They talk to themselves and do not engage with the wider community. They are living in the UK not Pakistan.

"Whilst being rightly proud of their Pakistani culture and heritage they need to explain better and engage more with their non-Pakistani brothers and sisters if they want their children to succeed as British Pakistani citizens."
Yup, pretty accurate IMO.
At least he didn't include rude, arrogant and humourless in there too.
 
#4
Problem? Seems fair and balanced.

The Guardian reported Mr Sabapathy's email said: "Pakistanis are lovely people individually but there is a lot of work to do to teach them basic common courtesy and civility.

"They talk to themselves and do not engage with the wider community. They are living in the UK not Pakistan.
 
#5
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-34228047

A Lord Lieutenant expresses (in a calm manner imo) a view that some members of our Pakistani Community do not integrate and are sometimes not civil to others. The e-mail in which the comments are made is leaked to the Guardian and the Lord Lieutenant resigns (probably to seek to avoid bringing HM into a controversial discussion).
This story reminded me of the Simon Weston/Guardian journalist story. Why is this story more news-worthy than that? Who decides to focus on certain stories and to disregard others?
(I'm fresh from listening to a BBC journalist offering personal criticism of the Hungarian govt re. refugees rather than reporting facts).
Any views?
Some of this insidious Let Me Report My Views, Not The News strain of journalism can be laid at the foot of BBC TV and the use of the phrase '...............so, John/Mary/Whoever, can you give us a sense of what it's like there at the moment?'. In other words, a direct invitation for the on-site reporter to give rein to his/her personal (and mostly unfettered and biased) opinions. That these opinions are rarely challenged-if they are, then the comments are mostly weak and worth little-can prove powerful in shaping public opinion.
 
#6
Yup, pretty accurate IMO.
At least he didn't include rude, arrogant and humourless in there too.
Well he wasn't talking about certain ARRSE mods was he?
 
#7
A parable of our times.
 
#8
If there is one thing guaranteed to give the Guardian a hard one its a story that somehow can be linked to the Queen and tar her some how. The gentleman was the Queens representative in the county, ergo the Queen thinks along the same lines. She may well do so, most rational people would to.
 
#9
He's bang on the money with his assessment.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
#11
In response to the threat title, the Editors and whoever owns the paper/news channel. In response to the article, it is well known that there is no love lost between Pakistan and Indian in the geo-political and cultural stages. This kind of comment could be seen as being inappropriate in the political/diplomatic post of Lord Lieutenant.
 
#12
. In response to the article, it is well known that there is no love lost between Pakistan and Indian in the geo-political and cultural stages. This kind of comment could be seen as being inappropriate in the political/diplomatic post of Lord Lieutenant.

But we are talking about different sections of the British population in a British city.... or aren't we?
 
#13
But we are talking about different sections of the British population in a British city.... or aren't we?
Agreed.
When I saw the headline, my assumption was that the Lord Lieutenant had used a racist/sectarian term or said something that was very provocative. The Lord Lieutenant's role is sensitive (in this context) but his comments were measured. I hope to God that we are not at the stage where even measured comments are condemned if they are critical (eg not offensive, just critical).
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
Well even Cameron's put his foot in it, an aside about Yorkhire-Outrage bus anyone?
Yes, but Cameron is known for insulting a lot of people, including Her Majesty, with his asides while trying to impress other people.
 
#19
A parable of our times.
Very much so. Dare to express an opinion that upsets the PC status quo and out you go.

One article on the immigrant crisis had a rider on the comments section that promised to publish pro opinions but stated that contrary views were 'racist' and wouldn't be published.

People are already looking over their shoulder before expressing views in public. Hence the opening sentence.

'I'm no, 'whatever', but...'
 
#20
I'm barred from Costa coffee for expressing my views of the tea they tried to serve me up.

" piss off and don't come back " being the actual words they used I believe.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top