Whisky

#41
crabby said:
The ONLY thing that should be mixed with whiskey is ginger wine - makes a lovely Whiskey Mac.
CRABBY, get to the back of the class!

Admittedly adding anything to a lower end of the market cooking whiskey (and by that I include anything blended, call me biased but I'm a single malt man) can only serve to improve what is in effect a distilled abortion, however, the only acceptable thing to add to a single malt is water, and not that chemically enhanced shite they pump through our taps.
 
#42
IMHO There is a fantastic whiskey sold in NI which is called old comber I don't know if you can still buy it but it is absolutely outstanding!
 
#43
Pielover said:
I prefer Irish whisky, Black Bush or Paddy preferably. Having said that I would drink meths if I didn't have any booze in so I'm not what you would call a purist..
I'm with you on that one Pielover. I prefer the Irish too. I picked up a gorgeous Bushmills 16 year old Malt when I did the distillery tour in Northern Ireland. Paddy is great too, though slightly rougher edges on it compared to my beloved Bushmills.

How do I drink it? Straight up, mixed with nothing - not even ice!! 8O

Ice :D :D :D
 
#46
Ice_and_a_Slice said:
risingtrout said:
Isle of Jura is probably my favourite followed by Speyburn
Good call Rising Trout - Jura is my 3rd choice.

(I think we've found a subject to my liking here....... Oops! :D )
We've noticed Ice!! Shouldn't that be Hic!? :D
 
#47
stan2484 said:
Get a bottle of Edradour superb, fortunately I am currently doing a gig in Edinburgh so a bit spoilt for choice as every 'real' boozer here stock between 40 - 100!!!

Slange!!
You are indeed a lucky man.

Slange Var!
 
#49
Bullet Sponge said:
crabby said:
The ONLY thing that should be mixed with whiskey is ginger wine - makes a lovely Whiskey Mac.
CRABBY, get to the back of the class!

Admittedly adding anything to a lower end of the market cooking whiskey (and by that I include anything blended, call me biased but I'm a single malt man) can only serve to improve what is in effect a distilled abortion, however, the only acceptable thing to add to a single malt is water, and not that chemically enhanced shite they pump through our taps.
I wouldn't dream of mixing a proper malt. However, whisky mac is not to be sniffed at.

I don't have water or ice with any whisky, can't stand it. What is the idea behind sticking water in perfectly good whisky?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#50
crabby said:
[
What is the idea behind sticking water in perfectly good whisky?
The theory is that is frees the aromas and increases the flavour but alledgedly according to the purists you should only add water from the same stream that the distillery draws from!

Or at least from the same region, so that if the whisky comes from a hard water region, you add hard water, soft water used to make it, add soft water!

I don't bother adding any as I find it just waters it down!
 
#51
crabby said:
Bullet Sponge said:
crabby said:
The ONLY thing that should be mixed with whiskey is ginger wine - makes a lovely Whiskey Mac.
CRABBY, get to the back of the class!

Admittedly adding anything to a lower end of the market cooking whiskey (and by that I include anything blended, call me biased but I'm a single malt man) can only serve to improve what is in effect a distilled abortion, however, the only acceptable thing to add to a single malt is water, and not that chemically enhanced shite they pump through our taps.
I wouldn't dream of mixing a proper malt. However, whisky mac is not to be sniffed at.

I don't have water or ice with any whisky, can't stand it. What is the idea behind sticking water in perfectly good whisky?
It releases the aromas from the whisky and enhances the flavour. Try it, just add a small splash at a time until you get the right mix for you.
 
#52
BA Business Lounge at Heathrow has a 15yo Glenlivet, so as my flight was delayed for 2 hrs and I turned up 2 hours early like a good ex-soldier does, I roundly abused the hospitality (just making sure my current employers were getting there moneys worth you understand!!) and dropped copious amounts of the heavenly liquid down my neck.

What makes it even better is I get paid travel time (contracting is great!!) so was being paid time and a half at the same time as well, winner!! :D
 
#53
If you get quite into the single malts then you can try what myself and my best mate are going to do later in the year, that is to purchase a barrel of some good stuff. The easy steps to a great investment (according to my mate (a whiskey swilling Scot) is apparently:

1) chose the distillery of your favourite tipple
2) purchase the barrel (last estimate about £600) that has been freshly filled with the alcohol.
3) the distillery will keep it for you and allow it to mature in their traditional way (Islay malts can be left outside with the salty air from the sea adding that little extra zing)
4) It can't be bottled until a minimum period of 3 years has elapsed, but the longer you leave it the more mature and mellow it becomes.
5) When it comes to bottling it, you'll have lots a small amount through the barrel called the "Angels share", via evaportation, but out of one barrel you'll get about 120 bottles.
6) Now the painful bit.......you have to then pay the duty on it at the time of bottling. However, I have been reliably informed by someone who works for a very large group of distillers/breweries that you can call the whiskey what you want. It is recommended that somewhere in the title you put "limited edition" and give each bottle a number out the total, i.e. 1/120, 2/120 etc. If you then sell them on e-bay (may not need a liquor licence if you call it "cask strength") to someone in the UAE or such country, even Japan, then you could sell each bottle for about £120 or more!!!!
7) If i am not being bulls***ed by my mate and other contacts then that is quite a return!!!

Alternatively you can drink the lot yourself!!

My preferred tipple is a 15 year old Bowmore or a 16 year old Lagavulin with added same measure of water. Why burn off your throat when you can taste the flavours?
Lovely

(drooling) :roll:
 
#54
Try Poit Dubh - the only Hebridean malt. Gunners on here who have been up to Benbecula will know it. They will also know its blended cousin, the lovely "Tea Bag"!
 
#57
Hescoheed said:
My preferred tipple is a 15 year old Bowmore or a 16 year old Lagavulin with added same measure of water. Why burn off your throat when you can taste the flavours?
Lovely

(drooling) :roll:
I was at a friends place for dinner yesterday and he pulled out a bottle of 25yr old Lagavulin. It was superb. We switched back to the 16yr old stuff (one of my favourite brews) one we had the cigars puffing.

If you can find it, then buy it.
 
#58
Ah Dread thats sounds lush, a 25 year old Lagavulin ummmmmmm. Sounds like a perfect end to a good dinner. Hoped you enjoyed it as much as I most certainly would.

I sat in the Leith vaults in Edinburgh one night at the Scotish Single Malt Society and had an unforgettable night, although the wallet had the s**t kicked out of it.

I'll be certain to look out for it.

Whats the oldest whisky (the length of time spent in the cask) anyone has had, and was it the best ever or a good dram but not much different to younger ones?
 
#60
If it has not been metioned yet:

Milroy's of London

Is an excellent source for the rare & rather expensive bottlings of
amber nectar. To be found on Greek Street in London.

For example:

BOWMORE 38 YEAR OLD 1957
40.1% ABV, Bottle 428 & 429 of 861,
Distillery Bottled
6 Bottles in a case
£999.00

Oh, and they do stock normal stuff as well :)
 

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