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Whisky - elixir of life

jmb3296

War Hero
I invested in the Distillery over three years ago when they asked for investments and we all got a T shirt and the option of getting a bottle of the first run of whisky. Today I received an email saying that the first run is being bottled and sent out in the next couple of weeks. They are also selling the remaining bottles of the first run at £100 a pop which is in my opinion a wee bitty expensive for a three year old but it could be an investment . The investors bottles all have an unique label so do I buy another one to taste or just open my bottle when it comes

View attachment 515660

it is indeed very expensive for a three year old, but very cheap for a first bottling which will only appreciate.
 
Got a bottle of Glengoyne today for 10 quid. Admittedly it was priced at £35 but I had a voucher to use up at M&S so that seemed a sensible purchase for a 'celebration'.

Very nice, reminds me vaguely of Glenfiddich in that the initial taste is very smooth and there's just a hint of something stronger in the aftertaste. Doesn't need any water to be eminently drinkable and I get the feeling it's what an Islay would taste like without any peat if that makes any sense (the Glengoyne distillery is just outside Glasgow near the West Coast and Loch Lomond).

I foolishly didn't visit the distillery last time I was up there as I was busy walking up steep hills and then moaning about how much my legs hurt. I might need to adjust my priorities in future :rolleyes:
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
My latest aquisition from Aldi for a mere € 20.00. As I had finished off my Laphroaig a re-supply was needed, urgently. Had I waited about 1 month for the Chrissy specials from Aldi, Lidl, Netto etc there would no doubt be some real bargains. Maybe I'll buy one anyway.
A Lagavulin; it's £50 fair enough, but that's reduced and not so bad for a 16yr old
 

jmb3296

War Hero
A Lagavulin; it's £50 fair enough, but that's reduced and not so bad for a 16yr old

Did the distillery tour there one year on whisky tour with the whisky club and the two guides added so much value, let us sample the wort ,“ it’s getting distilled anyway what’s the issue“ and then shut us in the tasting room with a “ let us know when your done”
thank you ladies, I appreciated that tour and your whisky ever since.
 
I am a firm believer that whisky is made by time, place and company and is capable of transporting you back to the time and the memories of when you first tasted it.

my sons best mate Has joined our household And is currently staying with us to let him work in Edinburgh ( he stays in the west highlands normally)

he brought with him a bottle of Jura Journey for me. ( good lad)

jura journey is described as their entry level expression and has no age statement. It hasnt been on the market all that long but tastes very very similar to the version of a Jura bottled 30 years ago when it wasn’t the fashionable malt it is now.

jura back then was cheap. so became popular with me and I have always had a soft spot for it. It was the first malt I was introduced to and Journey tastes very similar, if not identical to the bottlings of 30 years ago.

on tasting it I was transported back to corstorphine cid office 30 years ago where my DI on a Wednesday would pull out a bottle of Jura and launch the cork into a bucket as a statement of intent. He was from the western isles and that is not an unusual practice from islanders. The therapeutic debrief of the team would then follow.

Jura journey has mixed reviews on line which is a bit harsh. The whisky is an unpretentious Easy drinking malt, matured in bourbon casks so a good taste of toffee, and very easy drinking.

good value too, apparently can be got for £22 in some supermarkets.

at that price well worth the purchase.

£23 at Waitrose.

 
It's an interesting issue with price, there seems to be a certain level of diminishing returns the more you pay.

There's a big step up from blend to single malt (To my taste) so that step up from £15 to £25-35 is a big one.

There's a difference in flavours when you get into those higher ages, if you like those flavours, so around £25-£50 is a step up but not as big a gulf as the first.

Beyond that, there seems to be a smaller and smaller difference and you start paying for the label more than big leaps in flavours

Well to me anyway, taste buds are all personal
For sure, there's shit loads of snobbery involved and it comes down to what you like. Just cracked a bottle of Longrow Peated and it's tops.

Finished a bottle of Deanston 18 last week and it was good, much better than the 15 I supped earlier but for my tastes, neither come close to the Longrow. Which is loads cheaper.

I'd say you can get some really good malts at the £100 mark but it's still a bit hit and miss, once you get above that you're into investor territory and I have no intention of popping my clogs with an expensive collection.
 
I am a firm believer that whisky is made by time, place and company and is capable of transporting you back to the time and the memories of when you first tasted it.

my sons best mate Has joined our household And is currently staying with us to let him work in Edinburgh ( he stays in the west highlands normally)

he brought with him a bottle of Jura Journey for me. ( good lad)

jura journey is described as their entry level expression and has no age statement. It hasnt been on the market all that long but tastes very very similar to the version of a Jura bottled 30 years ago when it wasn’t the fashionable malt it is now.

jura back then was cheap. so became popular with me and I have always had a soft spot for it. It was the first malt I was introduced to and Journey tastes very similar, if not identical to the bottlings of 30 years ago.

on tasting it I was transported back to corstorphine cid office 30 years ago where my DI on a Wednesday would pull out a bottle of Jura and launch the cork into a bucket as a statement of intent. He was from the western isles and that is not an unusual practice from islanders. The therapeutic debrief of the team would then follow.

Jura journey has mixed reviews on line which is a bit harsh. The whisky is an unpretentious Easy drinking malt, matured in bourbon casks so a good taste of toffee, and very easy drinking.

good value too, apparently can be got for £22 in some supermarkets.

at that price well worth the purchase.
A big yes to the first bit and Jura's fine for what it is, as you say, easy drinking and you can buy someone a glass without putting them off whisky. Think they lost it a bit when they moved away from age statements and have recovered now.

Lot of cheap whisky about, market must be suffering.
 
A covid 19 Yr Old ?

A load of pish, we're fine, it can't get past a film of malt!
All of that duty free isn't selling and pub sales aint great. I've bought shit loads mind, which for the most part I've not drank.
 
Lot of cheap whisky about, market must be suffering.
Not here; I'm a happy budgie with the cheap offers. I've just explored the Amazon shops (prime, and so no obvious delivery costs) and taken three bottles for about £50. (Black Bottle, Grouse and Chivas R). In my diabetic, crippled state I mustn't drink the sugar-laden beers which were previously my staple, so have to get the kicks from whisky and carbonated water (and Skol lager. And homebrew, but that's between us, ok?).

I have to say that Black Bottle has impressed me; it's got some Islay depth but isn't raw, and with a block of ice - not my normal preference - is very pleasurable indeed. Added to my list now; thanks to those who noted it here. A glass of Bowmore to them. (Damn, damn, given it away again...)
 

Niamac

GCM
I only saw this once. We were on exercise in North Scotland and the party got fairly wild. I watched our host get a new bottle of Glemorangie out. He opened it and threw the cork away as if he had no further use for it.

And, in truth, he hadn't.
 
All of that duty free isn't selling and pub sales aint great. I've bought shit loads mind, which for the most part I've not drank.
Apparently, taxes in the US now affect Irish and Scotch whiskies hugely, but Welsh and English not at all (I wasn't aware, and may have been mentioned upstream) so the traditional sources are particularly expensive there. Five years downwind, this will be a big thing.
 
I only saw this once. We were on exercise in North Scotland and the party got fairly wild. I watched our host get a new bottle of Glemorangie out. He opened it and threw the cork away as if he had no further use for it.

And, in truth, he hadn't.
At one time (Tanganyika, 1950s), that was the practice on Friday evenings at opening time at the Club. But with gin, the bloody heathens.
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Not here; I'm a happy budgie with the cheap offers. I've just explored the Amazon shops (prime, and so no obvious delivery costs) and taken three bottles for about £50. (Black Bottle, Grouse and Chivas R). In my diabetic, crippled state I mustn't drink the sugar-laden beers which were previously my staple, so have to get the kicks from whisky and carbonated water (and Skol lager. And homebrew, but that's between us, ok?).

I have to say that Black Bottle has impressed me; it's got some Islay depth but isn't raw, and with a block of ice - not my normal preference - is very pleasurable indeed. Added to my list now; thanks to those who noted it here. A glass of Bowmore to them. (Damn, damn, given it away again...)
I'm not unhappy with the offers. I've long thought that lots of whisky is overpriced, once the city started investing we were fecked. The really good stuff was always going to be out of our price range but, as I've also said, it's a double edged sword, where we lost on top end, we gain on variety lower down.
 
Apparently, taxes in the US now affect Irish and Scotch whiskies hugely, but Welsh and English not at all (I wasn't aware, and may have been mentioned upstream) so the traditional sources are particularly expensive there. Five years downwind, this will be a big thing.
I think I might have mentioned it upthread, but I’m damned if I can find it. Part of POTUS 45’s trade war was on certain items manufactured in Europe, and imported Scotch Whisky was one (among a huge amount of others).
Distilleries have a current problem exporting to the USA, and that whisky has to go somewhere. Lots will go to the EU before Brexit, and the U.K. consumer can only really benefit from the glut of the remainder.
I suspect blended whiskies will be a good deal for the consumer for a while as that stock is absorbed into the domestic market.
 
I think I might have mentioned it upthread, but I’m damned if I can find it. Part of POTUS 45’s trade war was on certain items manufactured in Europe, and imported Scotch Whisky was one (among a huge amount of others).
Distilleries have a current problem exporting to the USA, and that whisky has to go somewhere. Lots will go to the EU before Brexit, and the U.K. consumer can only really benefit from the glut of the remainder.
I suspect blended whiskies will be a good deal for the consumer for a while as that stock is absorbed into the domestic market.
Cheap whisky + lockdown = ???
 
Cheap whisky + lockdown = ???
Dunno about cheap. One thing about the U.K. is that we have, in general, respected whisky and not had shelves full of “Jock McSporran” aged three years and a day from a ropey barrel. Which has been refilled a million times.
Your average supermarket has a reasonably limited range because the Brits like established brands, which have spent many years getting to that position. That and supermarket buying and dealing with big traders.
I think lockdown mark two will be miserable for many. I took a quick break to deliver my dad a bottle of whisky for his birthday last month. If it hasn’t evaporated already (and there seems to be a high likelihood of this in his part of Staffordshire), then I would like to think him savouring a glass now and then might get him through the winter.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I think I might have mentioned it upthread, but I’m damned if I can find it. Part of POTUS 45’s trade war was on certain items manufactured in Europe, and imported Scotch Whisky was one (among a huge amount of others).
Distilleries have a current problem exporting to the USA, and that whisky has to go somewhere. Lots will go to the EU before Brexit, and the U.K. consumer can only really benefit from the glut of the remainder.
I suspect blended whiskies will be a good deal for the consumer for a while as that stock is absorbed into the domestic market.
Italy takes a lot of whisky - who would imagine?
 
Italy consumes a huge amount of whisky. Most of it quite young. Much to the annoyance of Cognac makers, the French also consume large quantities of Scotch.
German doesn't do bad either.
 

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