Whisky - elixir of life

Bad Smell

Clanker
And so, I've discarded the rules of a lifetime and now slosh great measures of fizzy water into my whisky. It's been a good experience, and one I shall continue with, but only because of the limitiations imposed by my stupid pancreas. So; don't worry about the amount of filthy, unnatural water in your nip; what counts is the essential taste, and the effect. Whisky is whisky is whisky, and the tiny peculiarities of each variety make it uncommon good in most cases.
Just buy Cask Strength Whisky and water it down to 40%.

You know I'm right.
 

Bad Smell

Clanker
Local breweries only produced bottled beers (I've never found the reason; canned is good, far more easily transportable, and cheaper) such as 'Kilimanjaro' and 'Safari', both of which were actually excellent pilsners.

Further South, 'Bollingers' beer in Zim was as good as any produced in Europe, as was the Namibian 'Windhoek'.
Ah, yes. Windhoek by SWB. The choice was the red, blue or white can. I liked the red canned "Special" so much I even have an empty can on my desk as a pencil holder.

Windhoek
SPECIAL
The stronger man's beer
A FULL FLAVOURED LAGER - EXTRA MATURED
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
No knowledge of that, but in my (Eastern African) part of the world where I became well fond of Castle, it was locally - and possibly only on our licence - named 'Cludge'. Slabs were the common order at the village or town bottleshop, and the good thing about it was that it was consistent and reasonable juice.

Local breweries only produced bottled beers (I've never found the reason; canned is good, far more easily transportable, and cheaper) such as 'Kilimanjaro' and 'Safari', both of which were actually excellent pilsners.

Further South, 'Bollingers' beer in Zim was as good as any produced in Europe, as was the Namibian 'Windhoek'.

Why the feck any of these people couldn't market a decent local brandy or wine, or global market in beer, is beyond me; every possible advantage is there. Reeks of a failure of ambition.
IIRC the use of bottles meant a big saving for brewers as they could and did recycle them many times. Cans didn't have the same possibilities ,then. Castle were so pleased with our consumption of their beer that they donated 3 pool tables for our continuous pleasure. During a strong bout of weather they would and did deliver 3 truckloads a week. Night shift coming off would do brekkie and then attend the pub for 2 hours and close up at 0900 so they'd be fit for night shift after some sleep. As you state pretty good beer in E Africa and SA as well.
 
Just buy Cask Strength Whisky and water it down to 40%.

You know I'm right.
More discipline is necessary, now that whisky has been forcibly propelled into being my first choice for alcoholic fluids of joy over good ale; they were tied in priority previously, but no carbs for me now, and hard liquor has none of those unhealthy things, whatever they are.

Trouble is, when I log onto this site of an afternoon, and find more than 25 'alerts' I know that I've been spreading gobshitery around in the night before, and this is an indication either that the News that day displeased me, or that inhibitions had been lost, and the attraction of much gobshitery was too compelling.

As I say, 'discipline'. Cask strength is out. On weekdays.

(The higher the number of 'alerts', the more a chap's brain does this: )
 
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Just bought a bottle of Six Isles blended malt from M&S down from £25 to £20 so I thought I would give it a try. I will report back after I have opened it
 
@Whiskybreath and others, I always put some water in my whisky. I did get a bit pretentious and buy bottled water for a while. Nonsense.
My dad likes ginger ale in his, as does my MiL’s partner. Grand.
A splash of water from the tap is nice.
I have recently been to the continent to buy beer and wine. A supermarket in France had a “promo” on Whisky, but funds were depleted. I could only get a Dufftown Singleton and a Black Bush on my meagre funds, both of which I look forward to sampling.
Cheers!
 
a bit pretentious and buy bottled water for a while. Nonsense.
Ah, but. That tap water has chlorine, fluorine and sheepshit in it, all members of the 9th group of Elements, which includes Bromine. You know what bromine does to your testicles? Do you?
Fizzy, spring-sourced sainsbury's, stuffed with Carbon Dioxide is the Right Answer. Best of all, you're being kind to the environment by acting as a Carbon Sink; it all goes to your legs a bit, so be careful out there.
 
Ah, but. That tap water has chlorine, fluorine and sheepshit in it, all members of the 9th group of Elements, which includes Bromine. You know what bromine does to your testicles? Do you?
Fizzy, spring-sourced sainsbury's, stuffed with Carbon Dioxide is the Right Answer. Best of all, you're being kind to the environment by acting as a Carbon Sink; it all goes to your legs a bit, so be careful out there.
Group 7 (or 17 in new money). Also includes iodine so can't be all bad if you like Islay malts ;)
 
Ah, but. That tap water has chlorine, fluorine and sheepshit in it, all members of the 9th group of Elements, which includes Bromine. You know what bromine does to your testicles? Do you?
Fizzy, spring-sourced sainsbury's, stuffed with Carbon Dioxide is the Right Answer. Best of all, you're being kind to the environment by acting as a Carbon Sink; it all goes to your legs a bit, so be careful out there.
There is a lot of snobbery with malt whisky (almost as much as with wine) I am a firm believer in drink it how you like it and bugger the rest. Having said that wouldn't sparkling water alter the flavour? Why sparkling and not still?
Genuine question and not a criticism.
 
There is a lot of snobbery with malt whisky (almost as much as with wine) I am a firm believer in drink it how you like it and bugger the rest. Having said that wouldn't sparkling water alter the flavour? Why sparkling and not still?
Genuine question and not a criticism.
Could be. Try both and decide (not for nothing was 'Scotch and Soda' a favoured choice of beverage for many, many centuries.).
Group 7 (or 17 in new money). Also includes iodine so can't be all bad if you like Islay malts ;)
My table, when published, will demonstrate the futility and failure to properly research their subject of earlier workers. 9 it is; stand on me. The ultra-dense element 'bullshittium' is at the lower edge, near 'Ts', whatever that is.
 
Just bought a bottle of Six Isles blended malt from M&S down from £25 to £20 so I thought I would give it a try. I will report back after I have opened it
First thoughts, it works well with the peaty smokeyness of the western Isles as an aftertaste taste and the lighter notes of the Orkney on the first taste. Very pale in colour and well worth a punt at that price if you want to go up a wee notch from the normal malts on offer. The six islands are Arran Jura Islay Orkney Mull and Skye
 
So,,,,, since "getting" into whisky quite some months ago and posting a few times on here and listening to sage advice etc from those more learned than I.
I have tried numerous different "brews", all have been very different, ssomeone said it's a matter of taste as to what you prefer.
I have to say I keep going back to the very cheap £12.00 a bottle Scots Club from Tesco, it suits my taste(and wallet ;)) if I happen to come across something as palatable I will of course let you know.
 
I keep going back to the very cheap £12.00 a bottle Scots Club from Tesco
Good man. Don't waste cash on in trying to become, or pretend to be an 'expert'; it's like cheese; if you love Cheddar, stick with it and try a bit of Manchego or whatever occasionally, but don't go buying a luxury Roquefort just yet. You'll get there.

Actually, that's a bad metaphor. Roquefort's bloody lovely.
 
With the minimum price per unit of alcohol at 50p in Scotland that would be £14 here for your Scots club
 
Good man. Don't waste cash on in trying to become, or pretend to be an 'expert'; it's like cheese; if you love Cheddar, stick with it and try a bit of Manchego or whatever occasionally, but don't go buying a luxury Roquefort just yet. You'll get there.

Actually, that's a bad metaphor. Roquefort's bloody lovely.
Roquefort is very nice with Laphroaig.
To extend the food and drink snobbery further, one could say it “pairs well”.
 
Roquefort is very nice with Laphroaig.
To extend the food and drink snobbery further, one could say it “pairs well”.
One could, if one were a twat. Otherwise, one could say; "Mmmmm, glurgle". One would still be a twat, but a satisfied one.
 
Tel Aviv's finest has won a double gold in a blind tasting competition of world whiskies. I must confess to having become fond of it since I bought a bottle at the end of the tour of the distillery on 1st July.

 
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