Whisky - elixir of life

It was to do with “ Home Isolation “ … I live in a village in which probably more than 75% of us are retired … I was able with the help of my son to arrange some ongoing additional support to one of my more senior widowed neighbours of our community who hails from North of the Border .
There was me thinking that you were 'North of the Border'. 'Reiver' indeed. Robbing, murderous pests in that village, no doubt. The Elliot men will be down to see to you, soon, and the Humes (although I'm actually a Forster, so might help protect your kin. If there's money in it.)

Or good whisky.
 
Inspired by this evenings posts on this thread I am sipping some right now. I think it does need water, perhaps because it's 46%?
Totally up to you. Most whiskies over 40ish% have had some water added.
If you aren’t drinking from the cask, then you are doing as above.
Personally, I love a splash of water in my whisky. It brings out the flavours some more.
 
We used to do booze runs to the near continent. Great.
Revised plan includes a baccy and beer run to Belgium, then back to France for the main event ie wine buying.
I am looking out for some recent French Whisky offerings, both domestic and otherwise.
The French consume more whisky in one month than cognac in a year.
 
I am looking out for some recent French Whisky offerings, both domestic and otherwise.
Why? The French seem to have understood that Scotch is good. I'd test the rest, but rely on the majority opinion in this case. Money's involved.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
Is that a good deal by British standards?
Yes, I'd say that was good price for a specialist whisky which you wont see in the big supermarkets
 
My local Tesco has Penderyn Sherrywood down to £30 fro £42. 46% and one of those rare whiskies that I like equally straight (herbal, ripe and rich) or with a dash of water (frees up sweetness and a hint of citrus). It even goes with a lump of ice. As our host at the Penderyn Whisky Experience said “The only way to enjoy whisky is how YOU like it”. I have had just enough tonight to generate a nice buzz Chin Chin
Indeed, As You Like It a good pub name but .......check how they like it before deciding whether to crack the Springbank 18 or not.
 
Can any of you wise drammers tell me anything about this whisky? The bottle is sadly empty, I’ve looked online and can’t find a huge amount of info. Thank you!
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Here's a thing. I can't drink so much good ale as I used to ram down my alimentary tract (diabetes diagnosis - carbs are severely limited) but the good Doctor gave the green light for whisky and dry wine (thank feck). But, and it ...er, may have manifested in recent posts of mine, whisky is horribly alcoholic and can't be drunk as pilsner. (I seem to be able to tolerate small quantities of homebrew, but that ain't the same thing as a good Old Peculier weekend).

So; how to get inside the OODA loop of the attack upon ones' need, desire, and demand for booze; it's a regularly-felt and substantial requirement. A good ale or ten can keep a conversation lively for many hours; a few glasses of Wine of EU Origin may last until the first fist of disapproval impacts, but a sizeable whisky lasts for an hour at most, and not for the length of an evening squatting at a VDU bickering with Times 'comment' enthusiasts. Or ARRSE members. More is dangerous, in many ways.

And so, I've discarded the rules of a lifetime and now slosh great measures of fizzy water into my whisky. It's been a good experience, and one I shall continue with, but only because of the limitiations imposed by my stupid pancreas. So; don't worry about the amount of filthy, unnatural water in your nip; what counts is the essential taste, and the effect. Whisky is whisky is whisky, and the tiny peculiarities of each variety make it uncommon good in most cases.

(Apologies for all the flowery fringes; I've been listening to an interview with Roger Scruton while writing, and have been influenced. Almost as much as by the Chivas Regal).
 
Here's a thing. I can't drink so much good ale as I used to ram down my alimentary tract (diabetes diagnosis - carbs are severely limited) but the good Doctor gave the green light for whisky and dry wine (thank feck). But, and it ...er, may have manifested in recent posts of mine, whisky is horribly alcoholic and can't be drunk as pilsner. (I seem to be able to tolerate small quantities of homebrew, but that ain't the same thing as a good Old Peculier weekend).

So; how to get inside the OODA loop of the attack upon ones' need, desire, and demand for booze; it's a regularly-felt and substantial requirement. A good ale or ten can keep a conversation lively for many hours; a few glasses of Wine of EU Origin may last until the first fist of disapproval impacts, but a sizeable whisky lasts for an hour at most, and not for the length of an evening squatting at a VDU bickering with Times 'comment' enthusiasts. Or ARRSE members. More is dangerous, in many ways.

And so, I've discarded the rules of a lifetime and now slosh great measures of fizzy water into my whisky. It's been a good experience, and one I shall continue with, but only because of the limitiations imposed by my stupid pancreas. So; don't worry about the amount of filthy, unnatural water in your nip; what counts is the essential taste, and the effect. Whisky is whisky is whisky, and the tiny peculiarities of each variety make it uncommon good in most cases.

(Apologies for all the flowery fringes; I've been listening to an interview with Roger Scruton while writing, and have been influenced. Almost as much as by the Chivas Regal).
A drop of sparkling water shouldn't do it much harm. ;) An angels tear mind..
 
A drop of sparkling water shouldn't do it much harm. ;) An angels tear mind..
I've got a syringe I liberated from work which works surprisingly well for getting consistent results and not drowning the hooch. Probably best not taken down the pub though.
 
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A drop of sparkling water shouldn't do it much harm. ;) An angels tear mind..
Twat. That's in the past for me. (But it's true for the unaddicted).
But for the hale, hearty and bastardly, that's the watchword; the experience is to be treasured, not diluted or despoiled (in Jamaica, the JDF diluted their JD Red Label heavily with milk, and some of the WOs and Sgts Mess used coconut milk - it's possibly a nice drink in its' own right, but it's not good Whisky.)
 
I've got a syringe I liberated from work which works surprisingly well for getting consisten results and not drowning the hooch. Probably best not taken down the pub though.
I'd have given you an 'Excellent' for that other than for the fact that I may have influenced you in the commission of a crime in carrying druggy kit; when you get nicked, I'm not here, right?
 
I'd have given you an 'Excellent' for that other than for the fact that I may have influenced you in the commission of a crime in carrying druggy kit; when you get nicked, I'm not here, right?
Just the syringe, I don't have any hypodermic needles.

If the police ever search my place the syringes are going to be easier to explain than the distillation glassware and stash of pyro ingredients :rolleyes:

Back on thread, the Lidl Abrachan is still very drinkable for less than 18 quid a bottle. A little water gives it a less 'sticky' mouthfeel.
 

Mufulira

War Hero
Early Father's Day present, never had the Jim Beam stuff before, I will do the decent thing and not open it until Sunday. :p
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IIRC correctly you might just enjoy Bourbon in it's many forms --- I purchased a bottle of "Old Montana Red Eye" while in Montana for the princely sum of USD10.00 and have not cracked it open yet (12 Years) Meantime I have snogged down gallons of Jim, Jack, Johnny Red and Johnny Black and Jose to assert my love of spirituous liquors and the friends that are made simultaneously
 
Previous visitors to the Cape where this stuff was produced called it "Cape Smoke" -- maybe a fancy name for "Porch Climber Brown"
No knowledge of that, but in my (Eastern African) part of the world where I became well fond of Castle, it was locally - and possibly only on our licence - named 'Cludge'. Slabs were the common order at the village or town bottleshop, and the good thing about it was that it was consistent and reasonable juice.

Local breweries only produced bottled beers (I've never found the reason; canned is good, far more easily transportable, and cheaper) such as 'Kilimanjaro' and 'Safari', both of which were actually excellent pilsners.

Further South, 'Bollingers' beer in Zim was as good as any produced in Europe, as was the Namibian 'Windhoek'.

Why the feck any of these people couldn't market a decent local brandy or wine, or global market in beer, is beyond me; every possible advantage is there. Reeks of a failure of ambition.
 

Bad Smell

Clanker
Can any of you wise drammers tell me anything about this whisky? The bottle is sadly empty, I’ve looked online and can’t find a huge amount of info. Thank you! View attachment 488224View attachment 488225
It would appear to be a private bottling of Vatted/Blended Malt, so assuming the "Baron" ordered at least three casks and had them bottled. 43% so decent enough. I am going to have a guess and say it is a blend of Springbak, Talisker and Ben Nevis. If so, then a peppery, briney and meaty sherried single malt. Just an opinion and probably way off.

Try this chap who is on Twitter and Instagram - Angus MacRaild.
 
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