Which witch tonight?

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#3
Some music for the occasion.

 
#4
 
#5
Now that brings back some memories to an old git.

On my own in a small wooden hut in a massive field in Bavaria on the late shift in 1971, with a flimsy bolt on the door & the trusty issued baseball bat for self defence, I went outside for a leak only to see massive bonfires on all the surrounding hilltops.

I only crapped myself a little bit - honest!
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#7
Gurls dancing around the woods without their vests on ? Mistress Weatherwax would have a word I reckon....

No good will come of it.....I told 'em, I did ...didn't I TELL 'em? ...... stap me-a Hurdy-gurdy ! ....puts me in mind of Circa Paleo......Bugrit, millennium Hand and Shrimp!......great name for a pub.....pass the port...
 
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maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
#18
or is it just bollokcs??
For a start there are at least three or four "Spears of Destiny," or "Holy Lances," around the world. The one in Vienna dates as being no older than the 7th or 8th Century, long after the events in which it is supposed to have played a part. The artifact in question was thoroughly tested in 2003 by the English metallurgist Robert Feather and subsequently by the museum which owns it, and the results were nearly the same. From Piercing An Ancient Tale

Hitler took this Holy Lance from Vienna to Berlin after the Anschluss, but more as a symbolic act of union between the two countries rather than by reason of any superstitious belief of his. Hitler wasn't superstitious, although he certainly did have a tendency to believe what he wanted to believe. That, however, is a fault not confined to Hitler; Winston Churchill was said to have had it too.

If you're looking for strange tales, you might look into the relationship between Hitler and a known con artist by the name of Erik Jan Hanussen. It was Hanussen who was supposed to have taught Hitler the techniques of oratory and of staging dramatic effects. One wild tale (which was even dramatized as part of a National Geographic documentary) even alleges Hanussen gave Hitler a Mandrake root for occult reasons, and that there was an understanding between the two that if any fatal misfortune befell Hanussen, Hitler would come to a bad end.

Hanussen is even said to have predicted the notorious Reichstag Fire of 27 February 1933, but if he did, this was likely down to his having inside knowledge of it, or even having had something to do with it. There's a good possibility his blabbing about it led to his assassination on March 25, 1933, although this could also very likely have had something to do with his habit of lending money at usurious interest.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#19
Hitler took this Holy Lance from Vienna to Berlin after the Anschluss, but more as a symbolic act of union between the two countries rather than by reason of any superstitious belief of his. Hitler wasn't superstitious, although he certainly did have a tendency to believe what he wanted to believe. That, however, is a fault not confined to Hitler; Winston Churchill was said to have had it too.

.
Hitler may not have been, but Himmler sure was. Ever been to Wewelsburg?
 
#20
Hitler may not have been, but Himmler sure was. Ever been to Wewelsburg?
I've heard of and read about Wewelsburg, although I've never been there. It certainly is a curiosity in its own right, and it is something of a wonder that the Allies never destroyed it during their immediate post-war occupation of Germany, as they did with many other things and places considered to be Nazi symbols. I believe it was a man called Karl Maria Willigut who inspired Himmler to rent the castle ruin during the Nazi era. Willigut claimed to be able to "Channel spirits," as is said in modern times, but in reality, he was a drunkard and a man on the edge of insanity; he had in fact at one time been committed to a lunatic asylum.

When this was made known to Himmler, Willigut was quietly "Put out to pasture." He survived the war in retirement but not long afterwards died of the consequences of his alcoholism. For what it's worth, perhaps in part because of things like this happening, Hitler denounced occultism, saying at one point that while he was struggling to free Germany from primitive beliefs, Himmler was at the same time encouraging them. After the defection of Rudolf Hess, all occult practitioners in Germany were arrested, save those under Himmler's protection. The occult in Germany, as it is elsewhere, is certainly a curious thing.
 

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