Where have they gone????????

#41
But the breakfasts were excellent,as you would probably know,bean stealer?
Provided only one sausage was enough to keep you going. I’ve seen blokes almost lose fingers as the metal spatula swung over the counter to discourage them from trying to take two sausages.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#43
Squash?

Was that the fluorescent orange coloured chemical tasting stuff beside the tea urn?


Or was that the tea?
If it's orange and beside the tea urn, there's a good chance that it isn't tea! You were infantry, weren't you?
 
#44
If it's orange and beside the tea urn, there's a good chance that it isn't tea! You were infantry, weren't you?
It looked the same when you put milk in. Often the same temperature too.
(Recollections from my Infantry days).
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#45
It looked the same when you put milk in. Often the same temperature too.
(Recollections from my Infantry days).
That explains everything, who else would put milk in squash?
 

Sixty

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#46
My lad is starting phase two next week and asked me .....where have all the army chefs gone ...I asked why ...he said it's sodexo this sodexo that ...the foods cheap limited menu .so there you have it ...where have they gone
I think (to any given value of 'think') that the Catering Support Regiment are still on the go as an Army Reserve entity. They used to be / possibly still are Nationally Recruited RLC (V).

Nice bunch - although they trained at a place where the food was supplied by Aramark.
 
#47
But the breakfasts were excellent,as you would probably know,bean stealer?
Yeah, it was very civilised to stroll down the cookhouse of a Sunday morning, having got a paper from the NAAFI first, and dig into a gargantuan brunch.
I liked the scoff generally, sometimes the simplest things worked really well - like the soup we had on a couple of night shoots with a tin of boiled spuds chucked in. Bloody marvelous!
 
#48
Funnily enough, unless on operations or exercise, when was army food ever free?
When you were in the TA. Of course, the term "free" is used loosely - the cost formed part of the Regulars' food charges.

Probably one of the reasons we never really objected to being called STABs. If you were paying for our food, it's only fair that you could call us what you like. Remind me, what did the S stand for?

Our weekend breakfasts were served at a different time to brunch and were cooked by TA chefs. I suppose that's probably why we got two sausages. Thanks again, lads, they were delicious (in the old days).
 
#49
Fines and Detention for a single offence? I don't recall that. 'Either / or' I think but no matter. Where else but jail could you get tucked into bed by a power crazed lancejack RP whose sole aim in life was to become a council parking warden after his 22?
I may be wrong because it's so long ago now. However I seem to vaguely recall, if you were in detention, you lost your pay for the period of detention. Although I sailed pretty close to the wind on several occasions, as I previously said, I was never banged up. Perhaps someone else with a better memory than me can clarify?
 
#50
Funnily enough, unless on operations or exercise, when was army food ever free?
I managed to eat for free all over the MoD's London estate for a couple of years despite being nothing more than a PAMPAS geek at the time - had some bloody good dental work done FOC too. :mrgreen:
 
#52
I may be wrong because it's so long ago now. However I seem to vaguely recall, if you were in detention, you lost your pay for the period of detention. Although I sailed pretty close to the wind on several occasions, as I previously said, I was never banged up. Perhaps someone else with a better memory than me can clarify?
You lost your pay as you were deemed to be not soldiering as such. Do your detention and then soldier on as it were. You did get issued two cigarettes per day (at your own expense in my time) and you also got to make everything lovely and shiny... endlessly.

Mind you, if you refused to soldier while in detention or even under close arrest, life went rapidly down hill even further and faster than just being in jail.:):):)
 
#54
There was a bulky brown envelope involved IMHO.... Because it was only ever going to go one way...
A bulky brown envelope containing a contract that detailed something about off-shore tax havens and shell companies in either the channel or the Caribbean for years to come. Certainly not a one-off, and possibly not concerning a single member of the armed forces.
 
#56
#57
Sodexho refuel the aircraft at our mine, there is nothing they wont do for cash, however, I am amazed that people will work for a company that must pay its workers less than the army.
 
#58
As a matter of interest when large numbers of troops deploy to some far flung theatre of operations who knocks out the scoff? I'm pretty sure I saw 'Army' Chefs in Basra last November..

The BBC has outsourced to a company called Servix (or some such)..
Gone are the days of the Old Dear in the BBC canteen shovelling on more unrequested chips:
'Go on, Love before that fat git (insert name of presenter) get's their hands on 'em..'
 
#60
Cant see Sodexo doing much in a tent with a number 1 burner and some compo, like the guys did out on exercise. Ok I’m showing my age but some of the cooks did miracles with what they had
Agree, in spades. out in the forests of the fatherland, I had some of the best scoff, cooked up by the lads of the Andy Capps Commandos', on a No1 burner, after a night on stag, or in my case, swanning about from out station to echelon to outstation all bloody night, a hot cooked breakfast, and a mug of Nato bog standard, was most welcome. evening meals were supplemented by the lads, mostly lineys, bringing in "forest food"
my contribution one morning was a few dozen field mushrooms, only these monsters were at least 9 inches across, one bloke " acquired" some trout, and on one occasion a rover totalled a deer. All cooked up to perfection by the lads In the Aldershot Cement Company, hero's all. RIP.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top