Where are they now?

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
need to know, old boy. **taps nose**.
 
#5
Created at various points of the 20th century

MI1 Code Breaking
MI2 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI3 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI4 Maps and Aerial Photos
MI5
MI6
MI7 Propaganda
MI8 Signals Intelligence
MI9 Resistance Aid
MI10 Technical Analysis
MI11 Military Security
MI12 Censorship
MI14 Germany Desk
MI15 Aerial Defence
MI16 Scientific Intelligence
MI17 Secretariat
MI19 Interrogation

Only MI5 and MI6 still exist as far as I know....
 
#9
Someone 's been watching QI me thinks??
That's spot on, which I why I said I was reminded. When my sister did our family tree she discovered that our Grandfather was a railway station master in the early 20th century, and during the build up to the great war was somehow drafted in as a code breaker for the War Office. So it seems he was MI1.

Thanks for the answers; a mild curiosity has been sated.

Baggy
 
#10
MI-1 (Hare)
MI-2 (Hoplite)
MI-4 (Hound)
MI-6 (Hook)
MI-10 (Harke)
MI-12 (Homer)

Some of us were brought up on the former.

MI-4 last used by Iraqi Army during their invasion of Kuwait. Based on the Westland Whirlwind/Sikorsky S?? design
 
#11
Sad, very sad!
 
#12
Created at various points of the 20th century

MI1 Code Breaking
MI2 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI3 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI4 Maps and Aerial Photos
MI5
MI6
MI7 Propaganda
MI8 Signals Intelligence
MI9 Resistance Aid
MI10 Technical Analysis
MI11 Military Security
MI12 Censorship
MI14 Germany Desk
MI15 Aerial Defence
MI16 Scientific Intelligence
MI17 Secretariat
MI19 Interrogation

Only MI5 and MI6 still exist as far as I know....
Heh. Yeah.
 
#15
But didn't you think the Mi-2 Hoplite was a much sexier little beast than any of her NATO contemporaries
Not sexy when hovering close to you. Neither is HIND-D when live firing at Retzlow Range and you are underneath; 23mm empties can be harmful to health !

MI 9; can recommend the book by Foote....
Kechil
 
#16
Created at various points of the 20th century

MI1 Code Breaking
MI2 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI3 Geographic (areas changed on occasion)
MI4 Maps and Aerial Photos
MI5
MI6
MI7 Propaganda
MI8 Signals Intelligence
MI9 Resistance Aid
MI10 Technical Analysis
MI11 Military Security
MI12 Censorship
MI14 Germany Desk
MI15 Aerial Defence
MI16 Scientific Intelligence
MI17 Secretariat
MI19 Interrogation

Only MI5 and MI6 still exist as far as I know....
MI9 was also concerned with escape & evasion, and created and provided a lot of useful escape aids that were smuggled into POW camps by various means , including Red Cross parcels.
 
#17
Not sexy when hovering close to you. Neither is HIND-D when live firing at Retzlow Range and you are underneath; 23mm empties can be harmful to health !

MI 9; can recommend the book by Foote....
Kechil
Sorry to hear that Kechil,

Never had a HOPLITE hovering that close to me but remember being followed by a HIP-E from Stendal during one trip on the Berliner. Little Bugger wouldn't go away for a long while.

I believe the late Airey Neave MP was attached to MI 9 following his escape from Colditz (for the young ones amongst you, he made the First of Fourteen British Home Runs from Colditz)
 
#19
This will out me as a total spotter –
The initial allocation of MIs in Jan 1916

Directly under Director of Military Intelligence

MI1 – Secretariat
MI1(a) – Secretariat
MI1(b) – Special Duties – enemy ciphers [i.e. codebreaking]
MI1(c) – Special Duties – not accommodated in War Office [in fact, the ‘front office’ for SIS]
MI1(d) – Admin stuff

MI2 – Analysis, of which MI2(c), covering Germany and Austria-Hungary, was the most important sub-section. 2(b) did Turks and Arabs, 2(a) ‘ROW’.

MI3 – Analysis – allies and Far East

MI4 – Topographical intelligence and General Staff library

Under Sub-Director of Special Military Intelligence

MI5 – what it says on the tin

MI6 – Policy on cables, wireless, martial law, trade and traffic in arms, international law, ciphers (own), interpreters. Of most interest to the Int Corps is MI6(c) was responsible for the provision of interpreters, censors and Intelligence Corps personnel – this included an assessment of language skills and a very unsophisticated form of vetting.

MI7 – Press policy, censorship and propaganda

MI8 – Cable censorship

MI9 – Postal censorship

Responsibilities change over time e.g. by 1918 MI1(d) is responsible for designing our own codes and sections get added e.g. MI1(g) responsible for OPSEC, but that rough outline holds good until the Armistice. There are big changes in the inter-war period and more in WW2.

Sad, isn’t it? But perhaps not so sad as the helo spotters ....

C_C
 
#20
This will out me as a total spotter –
The initial allocation of MIs in Jan 1916

Directly under Director of Military Intelligence

MI1 – Secretariat
MI1(a) – Secretariat
MI1(b) – Special Duties – enemy ciphers [i.e. codebreaking]
MI1(c) – Special Duties – not accommodated in War Office [in fact, the ‘front office’ for SIS]
MI1(d) – Admin stuff

MI2 – Analysis, of which MI2(c), covering Germany and Austria-Hungary, was the most important sub-section. 2(b) did Turks and Arabs, 2(a) ‘ROW’.

MI3 – Analysis – allies and Far East

MI4 – Topographical intelligence and General Staff library

Under Sub-Director of Special Military Intelligence

MI5 – what it says on the tin

MI6 – Policy on cables, wireless, martial law, trade and traffic in arms, international law, ciphers (own), interpreters. Of most interest to the Int Corps is MI6(c) was responsible for the provision of interpreters, censors and Intelligence Corps personnel – this included an assessment of language skills and a very unsophisticated form of vetting.

MI7 – Press policy, censorship and propaganda

MI8 – Cable censorship

MI9 – Postal censorship

Responsibilities change over time e.g. by 1918 MI1(d) is responsible for designing our own codes and sections get added e.g. MI1(g) responsible for OPSEC, but that rough outline holds good until the Armistice. There are big changes in the inter-war period and more in WW2.

Sad, isn’t it? But perhaps not so sad as the helo spotters ....

C_C

I Say Old Chap - Can You Keep a Secret

Yes

Right - You're In !
 
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