Where are the Bustards?

#1
Right. Where on the Plain are the Bustards? Because:

1. Last year was Goose, the year before, Turkey. Now the Victorian family fancies something a bit more exotic.

2. It's the ultimate free-range bird (geddit?)

3. It is highly unlikely that there is a feckin' Nigella/Hugh/Delia/Mary Berry recipe for one. So Mrs V_M can be pointed discreetly at the sherry and told to go forth and entertain.

4. I'll make Bill Oddie cry which is no bad thing.

5. They are practically illegal immigrants.

So - six figure grid please and I'm also taking orders.
 
#4
Victorian_Major said:
3. It is highly unlikely that there is a feckin' Nigella/Hugh/Delia/Mary Berry recipe for one. So Mrs V_M can be pointed discreetly at the sherry and told to go forth and entertain.

Apparently not VM, Mr Hugh Fernley Whittingtw@t has one...



In the UK the Turducken is commonly known as a three-bird roast. English chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall expanded this into a ten-bird roast (a turkey, goose, duck, mallard, guineafowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, woodcock)

The largest recorded nested bird roast is 17 birds, attributed to a royal feast in France in the 19th century (originally called a Rôti Sans Pareil, or "Roast without equal") - a bustard stuffed with a turkey, a goose, a pheasant, a chicken, a duck, a guinea fowl, a teal, a woodcock, a partridge, a plover, a lapwing, a quail, a thrush, a lark, an Ortolan Bunting and a Garden Warbler. The final bird is small enough that it can be stuffed with a single olive; it also suggests that, unlike modern multi-bird roasts, there was no stuffing or other packing placed in between the birds. This dish probably could not be recreated in the modern era as many of the listed birds are now protected species.


Just need to get yourself down to the nearest Aviary for the Ortlan Bunting


good eatings VM..


JR
 
#5
V_M, what you are proposing is absolutely disgraceful to a wonderful bird.

Will it be roasted or creamy mash potatoes with it?
 
#6
western said:
Just so you know what they look like! It's a sad day when even our 'native' Turkey is replaced by an East European immigrant.
Ah, yes...would that be meleagris gallopavo, first domesticated for food by the Aztecs and brought here by the Espaneesh?

You're better off running down a badger if you want a British main course. :D




ETA: Sarcasm apparently harder for Yanks to detect online! :oops:
 
#7
Thats why I put the word native in single quotes
 
#10
54. Bustards [and cranes].
Roast them like stork; eat them with fine salt. Cranes likewise.
 
#11
western said:
Roast them like stork; eat them with fine salt. Cranes likewise.
I'm just trying to imagine who the guy was that looked at the stork and thought, "Screw the cow, I bet I can get a lot of meat off that baby."
 
#12
[quote="TankiesYank]
I'm just trying to imagine who the guy was that looked at the stork and thought, "Screw the cow, I bet I can get a lot of meat off that baby."[/quote]

Yeah but look at the size of the drumsticks you'd get :D
 
#13
I'm just trying to imagine who the guy was that looked at the stork and thought, "Screw the cow, I bet I can get a lot of meat off that baby."[/quote]

Must have been the same guy who saw something drop out of a hen`s arse and thought, `Hey, I`ll boil that for three minutes and have that with some toast!`
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#14
Traditionally one stuffs a bustard into a swan. Be sure to send a picture to Bill Oddie and Her Majesty?
 
#15
JRHartley said:
Victorian_Major said:
3. It is highly unlikely that there is a feckin' Nigella/Hugh/Delia/Mary Berry recipe for one. So Mrs V_M can be pointed discreetly at the sherry and told to go forth and entertain.

Apparently not VM, Mr Hugh Fernley Whittingtw@t has one...



In the UK the Turducken is commonly known as a three-bird roast. English chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall expanded this into a ten-bird roast (a turkey, goose, duck, mallard, guineafowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, woodcock)

The largest recorded nested bird roast is 17 birds, attributed to a royal feast in France in the 19th century (originally called a Rôti Sans Pareil, or "Roast without equal") - a bustard stuffed with a turkey, a goose, a pheasant, a chicken, a duck, a guinea fowl, a teal, a woodcock, a partridge, a plover, a lapwing, a quail, a thrush, a lark, an Ortolan Bunting and a Garden Warbler. The final bird is small enough that it can be stuffed with a single olive; it also suggests that, unlike modern multi-bird roasts, there was no stuffing or other packing placed in between the birds. This dish probably could not be recreated in the modern era as many of the listed birds are now protected species.


Just need to get yourself down to the nearest Aviary for the Ortlan Bunting


good eatings VM..


JR
Are they wearing CBA? No matter a 0.44 Black Talon will still take the feckers out :twisted:
 
#16
Eating a Bustard? Not for me ...

... this Christmas I will be mostly eating otter and stoat pie ... with mash ... and carrots.
 
#18
k13eod said:
Eating a Bustard? Not for me ...

... this Christmas I will be mostly eating otter and stoat pie ... with mash ... and carrots.
Ah my favourite Indian.

Chcken Tarka

Like Chicken Tika but otter
 
#19
Victorian_Major said:
spins said:
Ha Ha Ha.

No not the Biker Pub/Trailer Park complex.

The pub smells of wee and I once got a black eye from a little old lady in the trailer park!
When I was first married,as a very junior squaddie, I lived there with the then doris. I should have known that marriage was doomed!
 
#20
I've got a plausible grid. Worth a look.

Now I'm reading Danny Champion of The World and wondering if it's chestnut and bread stuffing or perhaps something fruity like cranberries?
 
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