when will they learn kids and dogs dont mix well

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by semper, Mar 12, 2007.

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  1. :frustrated:

    since Ellie Lawrenson incident in the New Year, lessons don't seem to have been learned , NEVER trust a Dog 100% , I most certainly would never have a dog , if i have kids, I couldn't live with myself if something happened.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tyne/6442505.stm

    re Ellie lawrenson, the fall out is now happening, in teh localpaper it is reported that the father is now insisting that the Grandmother be charged with an offence, I think they all should be charged, Kiel for having the Dog, The Mother and father for not heeding what happened to Ellie's Auntie, they put their drinking night out first rather than seeing the new year in withteh child, the grandmother for not thinking twice about allowing the dog to live in the house.

    when will these pillocks learn ? Pillock hoodies with dogs
     
  2. Because they do not have the intelligence to learn from their mistakes, they prefer to blame someone else for it, i.e. the police, social workers etc, this is the society we are now living in! :thumbdown:
     
  3. its all so easy isn't it. However, dogs attacking kids doesn't happen that often and i know of quite a few families who got puppies the same time the baby was born and they have grown up together like best friends. Not all dogs are savage killers. I think certain breeds should be discouraged but thats probbly my prejudice as I don't like dogs!

    And you comment for the parents going out, you obviously don't have kids. I love my kids to bits, but we also need to have a life and go out, and I have been out, leaving the kids with their grandparents, and i bet any other parent on here takes the oppotunity to go out. Its not like they left the child alone in the house.

    Its terrible tragedy what happened, and they should learn from it, but it was o ones fault per se (no one incited it) but i persoanlly wouldn't have kept that breed of dog! But again, i refer to my prejudice!

    OS
     
  4. I can only talk from direct experience. I've had kids over nearly fifty years and we have ALWAYS had dogs in the family. Mainly boxers but a sprinkling of labradors and now a German shorthair pointer. In some cases, the dog came into the family, others the kids were born and we already had a dog. I have never been conscious that any of my dogs were a threat - that does not mean I was not aware that leaving kids and dog unsupervised was dangerous. I had been a RMP dog handler and some of our dogs had killed and remained active guard dogs so they had a taste. I had seen what a good dog can do with its teeth on flesh. I was badly bitten as a kid when I went into my (builder) father's yard when I knew I should not have. One an other hand, one of my dogs brought me home from a sledding accident when I smashed up my face and was unable to see plus was semi-conscious.
    To me, dogs and kids are a natural. When I use the word 'dog' I mean a trained animal and not a lion on a piece of string. It does not have to be Barbara Woodhouse (SITTT) sort of training. The dog needs to know it's place and the kids have to respect the dog.
    I have drivelled on. This because I would not want anyone - parent or child - to be deprived of having a dog around purely because of what happened at the very bottom of the gene pool. If you want a dog and are not sure - ask around. There are lots and lots of us who enjoy dogs and want to spread the message. One word of caution - watch kids and strange dogs. Do not let them approach just any old dog they might encounter. Check with the owner that it is OK with strangers. Mine have always been strong on what they see as guarding me and the kids (useful in some of the countries we served in) and kept a watchful eye on those who came close. Even here, they displayed this concern by body posture and it was never an excuse to eat anyone.
     
  5. The worse thing is that the dog gets put down. Killed for just being a dog how is that fair?
     
  6. I have trained my 3 year old never to approach a strange dog (the fact he called them cats didn't help as I think they thought he was taking the mick): even if it's a dog I know, I will introduce them. I also wouldn't leave them alone as kids grab and poke at dogs, and they aren't all long-suffering floppy labs who just sigh and go back to kip. As long as both children and the dogs are trained, then no real problem - a mate has a pair of huge Boxers and both his kid and the dogs know the rules.

    However, a poorly trained landshark combined with a a lack of supervision = sprog getting eaten. The lad who had his lip removed was eating in close proximity to a staffie 'on a bench'. Who hasn't had a dog have a snap at a biccie? If the dog had been on the floor, the situation should not have arisen.

    And as for the muppets who wander the streets with dogs who are half a chromosome away from a crocodile so they look well 'ard to their mates....

    that comes under 'don't get me started'
     
  7. A childhood without a pet dog is half a childhood.
     
  8. i grew up with dogs and once work and home were suitable have got one of my own, it felt really odd not having a dog in the house. Not all of our family dogs were the long suffering lab types. i apparantly learnt to walk leaning partially on the rottie ( i had mastered standing leaning against the furniture and apparantly saw leaning on this moving object and following it as the next logical step). i remember there being groudn rules from a very young age such as not going near the dogs food, no poking or pulling the odg etc. I think a certain amount of repect comes from having a family pet as you grow up, ie you learn that if you are nasty to something it will not be impressed. having said that our rottie was 6 when i was born and my dad has said since i was not left alone with it until an age that i would not antagonise it. in fact the dog that bit me repeatedly as a small child was my grandmothers log haired yorkie, nobody ever took this serioulsy as it was too small to do any real damage. the problem arises when people get a dog and do not train it. grans yorky was not trained, but as a short arse it wasnt really a problem, had the rotty or labs not been traiined this would have been a problem, bigger stronger dogs need bigger stronger ( in will powre at least) owners
     
  9. Tytus_Barnowl

    Tytus_Barnowl On ROPs

    Dogs are dogs and pack devoted animals. It is people who have to learn to live with the same mentality and respect for each other.
    TB
     
  10. As far as I can see its the owners not the dogs fault. I have a Bulldog, soft as sh1te and loves EVERYONE, but when there are kids about I wouldn't leave him for a second unsupervised.... Sorry but as much as we feel we trust/know our dogs bottom line is we should NEVER trust them to be left alone with kids...
     
  11. Dogs I trust, kids?...never take your eyes off them for a minute :meditate: