When to say Sir or Maam??

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by sig_nuggit, Jul 8, 2005.

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  1. Quick question that's probably already been answered elsewhere but I couldn't find it.

    At what stage are we to acknowledge officers as officers? I have a friend (an ex) who's an Officer Cadet (after passing RCB with the regs - she joins in Jan) and now has the white flash on her rank slide.

    Does this mean I have to call her ma'am? Coz she's really expecting (and hoping) me to.
     
  2. The system is that as Officer Cadets thay are accorded the rights of an Officer and as such should be addressed as Sir or Ma'am and accomodated in the officers mess., but not saluted.

    In reality they should also know they are at the bottom of the heap and accept that they are lucky anyone even talks to them.
     
  3. Bugger! I'll try and get out of it, I hate being toyed with
     

  4. Miss XXXXX should suffice until commissioned.
     
  5. As the Sergeant Major said, "You call me 'Sir' and I'll call you 'Sir', but we both know which one of us means it........"
     
  6. I was told to treat them as normal but when they started to get command appointments (section comd) - you'd then start using Sir/Ma'am
     
  7. The answer obviously yes if you might get a shag out of it .
     
  8. who cares as long as you don't get shafted? just do whatever they want and keep clear, then when you get a chance.....you can frag them and blame it on charlie!
     
  9. Call her ma'am on duty and keep a straight face. The great thing about this is that it reminds junior Herberts that they are supposed to behave like proper orficers - and that you are entitled to expect them to do so.
     
  10. It is required that one respects the Queen's Commission and uniform of those wearing it.
    It is voluntary to respect the person wearing it unless you know they've earned it!
    (My guidelines from the 1950's-and probably hold true today).
     
  11. Spanish_Dave

    Spanish_Dave LE Good Egg (charities)

    we address the Queens commission not the individual, so call them what you need to and keep your heirarchy happy
     
  12. Definitive answer (from one who knows):

    if they are an Officer Cadet - i.e. wear either a UOTC or a Sandhurst Cap Badge and a rank slide with a single white band (or UOTC equivalent) you call them Mr or Miss. YOU DO NOT call them Sir or Ma'am (unless you wish to be facetious). RMAS CSgts may well call them Sir or Ma'am but those few good enough to be RMAS CSgts are absolute Gods and the wise OCdt will treat them as such. RMAS Staff can therefore do what they damn well please without fear of contradiction. (That is not facetious - I am a long time out of RMAS and I still think they are Gods)

    Anything that is engaged in Officer training but is not a member of a UOTC or else wearing a RMAS cap-badge is merely a potential officer and as such has neither rank nor first name. Treat them with care and consideration but deference is neither necessary nor desirable.
     
  13. Reminds me of the very junior OTC bloke attached for a weekend exercise to an RGJ platoon of the Londons. The youth told me that he was going to "Grip the ( Regular ) RSM, he didn't call me Sir."

    To my lasting regret I talked him out of it.

    His name was, appropriately enough, Pratt.
     
  14. Spanish_Dave

    Spanish_Dave LE Good Egg (charities)

    In Batus 1982 when the UOC reversed the 432 over the Qs leg when he was doing his puttees up, I am almost certain he wasnt called sir when asked to reverse
     
  15. scaryspice

    scaryspice LE Moderator

    Abacus.

    Totally agree with the first bit. Re the second bit - it's not mandatory to be a meber of a UOTC or wearing a Sandhurst cap badge to be an officer cadet. Those who have passed a commissioning board as part of a Unit are entitled to the same courtesy. They are NOT POs once they have passed that board.

    Scary