What's your favorite childhood sweet and or snack

View attachment 590046

A childhood and still current favourite; Italian fennel taralli (a typically savoury snack with the texture of a breadstick or pretzel, the ones containing fennel are my favourite). A rare treat when family returned from Italy with a package. You can get the miniature versions in shops such as Lidls or Italian delicatessens.


Never seen them, but Lidl's mortadella with fennel is excellent
 
My primary school was still feeding its pupils in a style and substance that would still be recognisable to anyone who had lived through WW2, some 20 years after hostilities had ended.

Overcooked, watery and beige was the order of the day.

My memories of the fare on offer at secondary school is less clear as I think I had graduated to packed lunches by then. It would have been similar. Standards were pretty much universal.

There are a few old British Restaurants still knocking around, albeit repurposed. The purpose built ones are instantly recognisable as they were built to a pattern. Two laterally adjoining pitch-roofed sheds. One section the old cooking and serving area the other section, the dining area.
We got food in insulated containers from another school some miles away. Who can forget lukewarm gravy, lumpy mash, custard skin a cat could run across, Marley tile pastry and that crime against gastronomy, Tapioca (or semolina, or sago). The 'named meat' line in Pratchett's work rang very true.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
My primary school was still feeding its pupils in a style and substance that would still be recognisable to anyone who had lived through WW2, some 20 years after hostilities had ended.

Overcooked, watery and beige was the order of the day.

My memories of the fare on offer at secondary school is less clear as I think I had graduated to packed lunches by then. It would have been similar. Standards were pretty much universal.

There are a few old British Restaurants still knocking around, albeit repurposed. The purpose built ones are instantly recognisable as they were built to a pattern. Two laterally adjoining pitch-roofed sheds. One section the old cooking and serving area the other section, the dining area.

In 1946 the British Restaurants were renamed Civic Restaurants.
 
In 1946 the British Restaurants were renamed Civic Restaurants.

There was probably still a need for them as rationing was still a thing well into the 50s and actually became even more onerous for some items.

I believe that British/Civic Restaurants were allowed to continue individually for as long as they could pay their own way.
 

tgo

LE
Fantastic topic!

I just read through the entire thread and I've eaten most of those, and had forgotten more than I thought.

I too had the 'sliced mars bar' thing, must have been a holdover from parents who went through rationing.

I haven't noticed much love for the savoury side of things though, I'll start the ball rolling with my favourite.

Twiglets.

No not these.
twigs.jpg


These.


images.jpg



In fact I vaguely remember that they came in a box or tin.

Something like this.

vintage-peek-freans-twiglets-tin_360_82e68465b4639fd9ea0780b6e98a6e25.jpg


I can eat these all day long, but oddly I can't stand marmite.
 
Fantastic topic!

I just read through the entire thread and I've eaten most of those, and had forgotten more than I thought.

I too had the 'sliced mars bar' thing, must have been a holdover from parents who went through rationing.

I haven't noticed much love for the savoury side of things though, I'll start the ball rolling with my favourite.

Twiglets.

No not these.
View attachment 590109

These.


View attachment 590110


In fact I vaguely remember that they came in a box or tin.

Something like this.

View attachment 590113

I can eat these all day long, but oddly I can't stand marmite.
I see your excellent Twiglets offering, and commend to The House Bovril Square Crisps.
ETA Brannigans Beer Nuts. Peanuts, in their papery skins, with a metric ton of salt.
 
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Question to the assembled brains trust.
1. Anyone remember the chewing gum that looked like gold nuggets and came in a small cloth pouch
2.Anyone remember something that resembled rolling tobacco, had some sort of pirate theme. Think it was made from strands of coconut

Or has the heat got to me and I'm making shit up?
 

Mbongwe

Old-Salt
Coconut Macaroon Bar: these were lush! Anyone remember them?
Coconut Macaroon.jpg
 

Mbongwe

Old-Salt
Question to the assembled brains trust.
1. Anyone remember the chewing gum that looked like gold nuggets and came in a small cloth pouch
2.Anyone remember something that resembled rolling tobacco, had some sort of pirate theme. Think it was made from strands of coconut

Or has the heat got to me and I'm making shit up?
1: Sort of; during the late 1980's-early '90s as a young kid I used to love "Gold Bullion" pineapple-flavoured teeny-weeny chewing gum nuggets in a tiny cardboard box shaped like a milk-carton.
 
Question to the assembled brains trust.
1. Anyone remember the chewing gum that looked like gold nuggets and came in a small cloth pouch
2.Anyone remember something that resembled rolling tobacco, had some sort of pirate theme. Think it was made from strands of coconut

Or has the heat got to me and I'm making shit up?
Found some on Amazon

Screenshot_20210719_221120.jpg
 
Coconut Macaroon Bar: these were lush! Anyone remember them? View attachment 590117
They were great, a year or two back I went searching for a recipe to make my own as we can't get them here, only to find the major ingredient was potato, followed by sugar. At that point my arteries clubbed together and put an embargo on me going any further.
 
We used to get what we called Liquorice sticks, apparently it is a root which is still available, they weren't rationed & actually not bad, you just chewed on it, got the flavour out and spat the resultant tough fibres out

1626784580780.png
 
Much on offer for school dinners was quite scary, but quite a few of the puddings were pretty good. One I remember was Manchester Tart - a shortcut pastry base with a thin layer of raspberry jam topped with a layer of set custard and the top sprinkled with coconut. M&S did quite a nifty version but it was something else that has disappeared from the shelves.
A favourite pud at our RN primary school lunches and featured in the RN cookbook of the time.
Everything was freshly prepared in the school kitchens run by a Naafi manager with RN-trained cooks.
 
We used to get what we called Liquorice sticks, apparently it is a root which is still available, they weren't rationed & actually not bad, you just chewed on it, got the flavour out and spat the resultant tough fibres out

View attachment 590209
Dentists generally encouraged the chewing of ‘Spanish root’, or just ‘Spanish’, as the fibre was a very effective toothbrush and prevented a lot of plaque.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Question to the assembled brains trust.
1. Anyone remember the chewing gum that looked like gold nuggets and came in a small cloth pouch
2.Anyone remember something that resembled rolling tobacco, had some sort of pirate theme. Think it was made from strands of coconut

Or has the heat got to me and I'm making shit up?
Don't remember the gold nuggets but can still imagine the taste and texture of Sweet Tobacco which had plenty of coconut - and perhaps lots of sugar too!
 
Much on offer for school dinners was quite scary, but quite a few of the puddings were pretty good. One I remember was Manchester Tart - a shortcut pastry base with a thin layer of raspberry jam topped with a layer of set custard and the top sprinkled with coconut. M&S did quite a nifty version but it was something else that has disappeared from the shelves.
still widely available in Manchester, surprisingly enough
 

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