Whats Your Charity?

#1
So many asking for your cash today that it is difficult to choose the charity to support.

Obviously do various military charities but my main one is Marie Curie. The care they provided for my family as my mum passed away with cancer in their hospice in Liverpool put the NHS to shame.

Exactly what it says on the tin. Who do you give to and why?
 
#2
NCF (childrens one)
Cancer Research (my sister had a bf who died of a brain tumour, so...)
Amnesty (just 'cos)
MIND (b/c mental health is an unsexy but worthy cause)
Baby Milk Action (Nestle p*sses me off with what they do!)

Only little amounts each month on DD, and the first four were all sign-ups on the street. But I walked up and offered with Amnesty and MIND, rather than being approached.

I am such a sucker.
 
#3
I've got direct-debits set up with Shelter and Cancer Research.
 
#4
BLESMA because when a squaddie dies it's sad but remembered, when he survives but looses substantial bits of himself in the process, it's forgotten -and THATS a travesty.

MIND because there but for the grace of god go us all...
 
#5
NDCS (National Deaf Children Society)is my prefered charity

if see other worthy causes i would drop my change etc in the tin.

.
 
#6
St Dunstan's - apart from anything else they let some blind ex gunner do over 164mph on a Ninja...... Now that is what i call a charity!!! Well worth a monthly donation.
 
#7
RTFQ said:
BLESMA because when a squaddie dies it's sad but remembered, when he survives but looses substantial bits of himself in the process, it's forgotten -and THATS a travesty.
BLESMA cos I spent 15 minutes talking to a boot neck in the Royal Vic Belfast in 1973 and didn't realise the poor ba*stard had lost both legs.

I'd gone to do the PR picture of one of our own who got shot 10 days into the tour and ended up talking to this bloke, it was only when I went to say goodbye I saw his legs were missing.

I still feel a stupid cnut 31 years on for not realising!
 
#8
Little one always gets silver/copper to give to tin rattlers so give to most.
 
#9
The Not Forgotten Association - they sort out TV sets and licences for ex-servicemen who need them, and organise day trips for those who would otherwise not get out, including a garden party with HMQ. It's not just for the old guys either - they have helped with quite a few who were wounded on TELIC. I have asked for their help with patients a few times and they have always been superb.

RAF Benevolent Fund

Combat Stress
 
#10
Some good tips in here for end of financial year when you are looking for ideas for mess etc charity payments. Make sure you let the presiding members and treasurers know.
 
#11
NSPCC - Fcuking hate the way some people treat their children.

Discipline is one thing but some kids are treated so disgracefully its sickening.
 
#12
Murielson said:
So many asking for your cash today that it is difficult to choose the charity to support.

Obviously do various military charities but my main one is Marie Curie. The care they provided for my family as my mum passed away with cancer in their hospice in Liverpool put the NHS to shame.

Exactly what it says on the tin. Who do you give to and why?
Thanks, I support them too for the same reason. Poppy Appeal, a local terminally ill childrens hospice in Luton : A story; As the building was nearing completion, totally funded by donations, some group on profound cnuts smashed ALL the windows (£200,000 worth) so we had to find the funds yet again.

SSAFA

But never 'Save the children' - there is no gurantee that the money stays in this country, if it were then yes but personally it should be called Stop the children as the only scene you get when a disaster strikes is the desperate children.
 
#16
Devon Air Ambulance, worth their weight in chocolate, every one of them! Attended at my RTA a few years back. First Class.
 
#17
Lippy said:
Devon Air Ambulance, worth their weight in chocolate, every one of them! Attended at my RTA a few years back. First Class.
Were you injured Lippy? :(
 
#18
ACF. Running the London Marathon for them in April.
 
#19
Royal British Legion, MacMillan Nurses, World Vision, RSPCA, pdsa

I'm all for giving cash direct but here are some other ways to donate and some bits and pieces on tax to help charities make the most of what you give them...

The latest British Attitudes Survey reveals that almost a third give less than £5 and often nothing at all, compared our American cousins who give around 2% of their income. And it seems that the more we have, the less we give. A report by the Institute for Public Policy Research shows that the richest 20% of UK households give less than 1% of their outgoings to charities, while the poorest 10% give 3% of their expenditure.

Last year saw the first drop in giving since 1996. Charitable donations come well down the league of spending priorities in the average household, below eating out, package holidays, newspapers and books, alcohol and tobacco. With 153,000 registered charities in the UK it is easy to find a good cause. There are also lots of easy ways to donate on a one-off or regular basis.

Charity credit cards and savings

This time of year is increasingly about running up huge credit card bills so why not make the most of your shopping splurge and pay with a credit affiliated with a charity of your choice. There are now more than 40 affiliated charity cards on the market offered by household names. These cards typically donate a one-off payment to the charity of between £3 and £20 when you use the card for the first time and then continue to donate a percentage or small amount based on how much you spend after that. This is usually somewhere between 0.15% and 1.25% which may seem small but adds up to more than £33 million for charities over the last decade.

Watch out for interest rates though – they can often be higher than traditional cards although they are getting more competitive. It may feel good to give to charity but try to avoid cards which will cost you a fortune in interest if you cannot pay off your bill in full each month. Unfortunately, the tax man does not provide relief on your donations as they are not counted as regular. But as most of us use a flexible friend, it may as well be of some help.

Give As You Earn

Another way to link your charity donations to your personal finances throughout the year is to Give As You Earn. Make sure your company has signed up for the scheme and your donations will be made from your salary each month before tax is deducted. This means that a £10 a month donation to the charity of your choice is costing £7.80 of your take-home pay if you pay basic-rate tax, while higher-rate taxpayers are giving up just £6 of their salary. If your firm does not offer GAYE, ask it to start.

Gift Aid

Making your charitable donations tax efficient is basic common sense. The National Giving Campaign says that if every donor gave their contributions tax-effectively, UK charities could claim an estimated additional £900 million from the Inland Revenue each year.

Donating money through Gift Aid could not be easier. For every pound taxpayers give, the charity receives an extra 28p from the Revenue. This turns a £10 Gift Aid donation, into £12.80 for the charity. If you are a UK taxpayer, all you have to do is give the charity a simple Gift Aid declaration which usually involves completing a short form or providing a few basic details for online or telephone donations.

Sharegift

The Sharegift scheme allows you to donate shares directly to your chosen charity and claim tax relief on the value of the shares, as well as any broker's fees and stamp duty. This is a particularly cost-effective means of getting rid of odd shares that would cost more than their value to sell and gives rise to neither a gain nor a loss for capital gains tax purposes and
For example, when Centrica recently sold roadside giant the AA, its shareholders received part of the share consolidation that resulted. But with tiny sums of between 23p and £2.15 involved, the 600,000 shareholders could raise more than £1million for good causes by donating via Sharegift. Increasingly, companies are working with Sharegift to facilitate this. Centrica included pre-paid envelopes with the cheques and new share certificates so that shareholders could donate.

Your time

If you are not able to give money, charities will always be grateful for your time devoted to anything from shaking a collecting tin to voluntary services overseas. Your company can also get involved, by lending staff to local activities for a few hours a week or getting involved in bigger projects which help develop team effectiveness as well as supporting good causes. For example, Nottingham-based Three Hands devises and runs bespoke challenge events in the UK, Africa, Central America and the Caribbean. Because the programmes are individually designed for small companies through to multi-nationals such as the Royal Bank of Scotland Group, they can help achieve excellent personal development results whilst also benefiting local, national or international community projects.

Your will

Legacies are one of the most important sources of income for charities. Any bequest will reduce your inheritance tax estate, where tax is payable at 40% on any amount over pounds 263,000. You can leave a specific gift which can be either an amount of money or particular possessions. Alternatively, you could offer what is left of the value of your estate after all debts and administration expenses have been settled and any specific bequests have been met.
 
#20
Mines Advisory Group

http://www.mag.org.uk

From their website:

Based in and around the community affected by landmines and unexploded ordnance, our Mine Action seeks to reduce the risk of injury and to help re-develop that community and its economic potential.

msr
 
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